Newswise: Food allergy is associated with lower risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection

Newswise: Food allergy is associated with lower risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection. “A National Institutes of Health-funded study has found that people with food allergies are less likely to become infected with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, than people without them. In addition, while previous research identified obesity as a risk factor for severe COVID-19, the new study has identified obesity and high body mass index (BMI) as associated with increased risk for SARS-CoV-2 infection. In contrast, the study determined that asthma does not increase risk for SARS-CoV-2 infection.”

KUT: A New Database Could Help Prevent Asthma Attacks Among Austin Children

KUT: A New Database Could Help Prevent Asthma Attacks Among Austin Children. “Researchers and data experts at the Dell Medical School at the University of Texas at Austin say a new database will help doctors treat children with asthma, while helping parents better understand how to reduce the frequency of attacks. With funding from the Michael & Susan Dell Foundation, a team at the Dell Medical School at UT Austin is trying to help patients and doctors track and mitigate environmental conditions that trigger asthma attacks.”

University of Arizona: Twitter And Big Data Could Predict Emergency Room Rush Hours

University of Arizona: Twitter And Big Data Could Predict Emergency Room Rush Hours. “Research that will be published in the IEEE Journal of Biomedical and Health Informatics combines Twitter posts and air quality and hospital data to form a model that researchers believe can predict emergency room trends more effectively and immediately than existing disease surveillance models, such as that published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. While health and data tools such as Google Flu Tracker have used social media and search engines to monitor the spread of contagions, this new model is the first to look at chronic illnesses such as asthma, the researchers say.”

Asthma: Predicting Increased Hospital Visits By Monitoring Twitter Activity

Predicting increased hospital visits by monitoring Twitter. “For the study, ‘The Twitter Asthma Pulse: Using Real-Time Twitter Data to Prospectively Predict Asthma Emergency Department Visits or Hospital Admissions in a Population,’ researchers collected tweets posted between October 2013 and June 2014 and narrowed them down to the 3,810 that mentioned asthma attacks and that originated in the Dallas-Fort Worth area. During the same time period, incidences of asthma-related emergency department visits and hospitalizations across the region area were recorded.”