NASA: NASA to Air Live Coverage of SpaceX Crew-1 Astronauts’ Return to Earth

NASA: NASA to Air Live Coverage of SpaceX Crew-1 Astronauts’ Return to Earth. “The Crew Dragon spacecraft, named Resilience, is scheduled to undock from the space station to begin the journey home at 7:05 a.m. EDT Wednesday, April 28. NASA and SpaceX are targeting 12:40 p.m. for the splashdown and conclusion of the Crew-1 mission. The return to Earth – and activities leading up to the return – will air live on NASA Television, the NASA App, and the agency’s website.”

Arizona State University: ‘Why We Go’ space exploration series launches

Arizona State University: ‘Why We Go’ space exploration series launches. “The Interplanetary Initiative at Arizona State University and the Translational Research Institute for Space Health (TRISH) are launching a monthly discussion series examining interplanetary exploration through conversations with diverse experts optimistically answering the question, ‘Why do humans go to space?’ The four-part virtual series dives into the philosophy and passions behind the desire to travel into deep space.”

NASA: Watch Next Space Station Crew Launch Live on NASA TV, NASA App

NASA: Watch Next Space Station Crew Launch Live on NASA TV, NASA App. “Three space travelers, including NASA astronaut Mark Vande Hei, are poised to launch Friday, April 9, from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan to the International Space Station. NASA Television, the agency’s website, and the NASA app will provide comprehensive prelaunch and launch-to-docking coverage.”

New York Times: I Spent a Year in Space, and I Have Tips on Isolation to Share

New York Times: I Spent a Year in Space, and I Have Tips on Isolation to Share. “When I lived on the International Space Station for nearly a year, it wasn’t easy. When I went to sleep, I was at work. When I woke up, I was still at work. Flying in space is probably the only job you absolutely cannot quit. But I learned some things during my time up there that I’d like to share — because they are about to come in handy again, as we all confine ourselves at home to help stop the spread of the coronavirus. Here are a few tips on living in isolation, from someone who has been there.”

Smithsonian: Neil Armstrong’s Spacesuit On Display at National Air and Space Museum for 50th Anniversary of Apollo 11

Smithsonian: Neil Armstrong’s Spacesuit On Display at National Air and Space Museum for 50th Anniversary of Apollo 11. “The effort to protect and display Armstrong’s suit also included sharing it with a wider audience. The museum and the Smithsonian’s Digitization Program Office 3-D scanned the suit, helmet and gloves. Through laser-arm scanning, structured light, photogrammetry and medical CT scanning, anyone in the world with an internet connection can now peek inside the suit and take a guided tour of its many complex components. The team has also made the data available so the public can download the high-resolution 3-D model for use in AR/VR platforms, animation software and 3-D printing. The scan data and a tour of the 3-D model are now available.”

The ChronicleHerald: Dal student to launch interactive archive of Chris Hadfield’s photos

The ChronicleHerald: Dal student to launch interactive archive of Chris Hadfield’s photos. “Over the past year, Caitlin Cunningham has looked at every one of the 13,199 photos taken by Chris Hadfield during his stint on the International Space Station in 2012-13. Out of that massive collection, she’s culled about 250 photos for a public interactive digital archive.”

First all-female spacewalk: How to watch NASA make history (CNET)

CNET: First all-female spacewalk: How to watch NASA make history. “It’s been 35 years since cosmonaut Svetlana Savitskaya became the first woman to walk in space when she stepped outside the Salyut 7 space station. On Friday, NASA astronauts Anne McClain and Christina Koch are scheduled to take a spacewalk outside the International Space Station. If all goes as planned, they will become the first all-female spacewalk team in history.”

Discover Magazine: A Peek at the Real Neil Armstrong

Discover Magazine: A Peek at the Real Neil Armstrong. “‘First Man’ gave us a look at a side of Neil Armstrong we don’t see too often, focusing on the family side of his life over the science element, but even that only gave us a glimpse of the behind-the-scenes home and family life of the notoriously stoic first man on the Moon. Now, the brand new Armstrong-Engel Family Gallery has published personal, never-before-seen images of Neil and his family beginning in 1955 during his Edwards days gong all the way to 1969 and the Moon landing.”

NASA: NASA, University of Texas at Dallas Reveal Apollo 11 Behind-the-Scenes Audio

NASA: NASA, University of Texas at Dallas Reveal Apollo 11 Behind-the-Scenes Audio. “NASA’s Johnson Space Center has the only functional remaining tape recorder capable of playing those approximately 170 remaining tapes. But the time and effort of converting them to current digital formats was daunting, and required the tape deck to be modified from being able to handle two-channels at a time to handle the 30 channels on the historic tapes. But through a collaborative effort with The University of Texas at Dallas (UT Dallas), the conversion finally has been completed, and the unique perspective of those at the core of supporting humankind’s ‘giant leap’ is available to download and listen to all 19,000 hours of audio recordings.” This is an incredible achievement. I posted in December about what it took behind the scenes to get this digitizing done.

The University of Texas at Dallas: Researchers Launch Moon Mission Audio Site

The University of Texas at Dallas: Researchers Launch Moon Mission Audio Site. “NASA recorded thousands of hours of audio from the Apollo lunar missions, yet most of us have only been able to hear the highlights. The agency recorded all communications between the astronauts, mission control specialists and back-room support staff during the historic moon missions in addition to Neil Armstrong’s famous quotes from Apollo 11 in July 1969. Most of the audio remained in storage on outdated analog tapes for decades until researchers at The University of Texas at Dallas launched a project to analyze the audio and make it accessible to the public.” Visit the site, yes, but also read the article. The team innovated a lot to get this done.

Help the ESA Refine Its Astronaut-Selecting Tests

The European Space Agency (ESA) needs your help in refining selection tests for astronauts. “Trainers at ESA’s European Astronaut Centre in Cologne, Germany, have developed a test that runs users through increasingly complicated spatial awareness puzzles, measuring an important factor in a candidate’s aptitude for space travel. And the group is expanding its methodology to include the general public.”