Black Enterprise: Database Makes Black Women With Ph.D.s In Physics More Discoverable

New-to-me, from Black Enterprise: Database Makes Black Women With Ph.D.s In Physics More Discoverable. “Out of the 2,000 physics Ph.D.s that are awarded in the U.S. each year, less than 0.5% of those are reportedly given to women of African descent. Doctor of Cosmology and University of New Hampshire professor, Chanda Prescod-Weinstein, is tackling the lack of representation in scientific research through Cite Black Women+ in Physics and Astronomy Bibliography, a database that lists professional publications by Black women who hold Ph.D.s in physics-related disciplines.”

CNET: World’s Oldest Known Map of Stars Found Hiding in Medieval Manuscript

CNET: World’s Oldest Known Map of Stars Found Hiding in Medieval Manuscript. “More than 2,100 years ago, Greek astronomer Hipparchus mapped out the stars — and for a long time, this had been considered humanity’s earliest attempt to assign numerical coordinates to stellar bodies. But despite its fame, the treatise was only known to exist through writings of another well-known astronomer named Claudius Ptolemy, who compiled his own celestial inventory some 400 years later. Until now, that is.”

Wired: For Modern Astronomers, It’s Learn to Code or Get Left Behind

Wired: For Modern Astronomers, It’s Learn to Code or Get Left Behind. “Fledgling astronomers take maybe one course in coding and then informally learn whatever language their leaders happen to use, because those are the ones the leaders know how to teach. They usually don’t take meaningful courses in modern coding, data science, or their best practices. But today’s astronomers don’t just need to know how stars form and black holes burst. They also need knowledge of how to pry that information from the many terabytes of data that will stream from next-generation telescopes like the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope and the Square Kilometer Array.”