Catholic Courier: Vatican Observatory launches podcast, new website

Catholic Courier: Vatican Observatory launches podcast, new website. “The podcasts are available on several platforms and they feature one of the pope’s own Jesuit astronomers speaking with a notable figure in the world of space exploration or science. For example, one episode features Jesuit Brother Guy Consolmagno — a planetary scientist, director of the Vatican Observatory and president of the foundation — speaking with U.S. astronaut Nicole Stott and her husband Christopher Stott of the International Institute of Space Commerce.”

NASA: Data Turned Into Sounds of Stars, Galaxies, Black Holes

NASA: Data Turned Into Sounds of Stars, Galaxies, Black Holes. “This latest installment from our data sonification series features three diverse cosmic scenes. In each, astronomical data collected by NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory and other telescopes are converted into sounds. Data sonification maps the data from these space-based telescopes into a form that users can hear instead of only see, embodying the data in a new form without changing the original content.”

Vanderbilt: Vanderbilt scientists sketch rare star system using more than a century of astronomical observations

Vanderbilt: Vanderbilt scientists sketch rare star system using more than a century of astronomical observations. “Vanderbilt astronomers have painted their best picture yet of an RV Tauri variable—a rare type of stellar binary, in which two stars orbit each other within a sprawling disk of dust. To sketch its characteristics, the scientists mined a 130-year dataset that spans the widest range of light yet collected for one of these systems, from radio waves to X-rays.”

Syfy Wire: Hold Your Breath And Enter This Hypnotic Map Of 25,000 Supermassive Black Holes

Syfy Wire: Hold Your Breath And Enter This Hypnotic Map Of 25,000 Supermassive Black Holes. “To aid in identifying the locations of these sinister sites, an international team of scientists led by The Netherland’s Leiden University has recently submitted for publication a comprehensive map pinpointing the locations of 25,000 supermassive black holes to the journal Astronomy & Astrophysics.”

Space Music: Data Sonification Turns Images From Space Telescopes Into Tunes (ScienceBlog)

ScienceBlog: Space Music: Data Sonification Turns Images From Space Telescopes Into Tunes. “In a new project to make images of space more accessible, Kimberly Kowal Arcand, a visualization researcher from the Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian, and a team of scientists and sound engineers worked with NASA to turn images of the cosmos into music. The team uses a new technique called data sonification that takes the information captured from space telescopes and translates it into sound.”

University Today: Here’s the Extremely New Website for the Extremely Large Telescope

Universe Today: Here’s the Extremely New Website for the Extremely Large Telescope. “In the vein of ‘go big or go home,’ the European Southern Observatory (ESO) has launched a stunning new website to showcase information about — and match the scale of — its Extremely Large Telescope (ELT), the highly anticipated observatory scheduled to have first light in 2025. The new website is well-designed and contains a plethora of details and images about the new telescope, its instruments, and how it will further our knowledge of the cosmos.”

Puerto Rico: Iconic Arecibo Observatory telescope collapses (BBC)

BBC: Puerto Rico: Iconic Arecibo Observatory telescope collapses. “A huge radio telescope in Puerto Rico has collapsed after decades of astronomical discoveries. The US National Science Foundation (NSF) said the telescope’s 900-ton instrument platform fell onto a reflector dish some 450ft (137m) below. It came just weeks after officials announced that the telescope would be dismantled amid safety fears, following damage to its support system.”

Phys .org: ‘Strange rays’ crowdsourced on social media shed light on black hole illumination

Phys .org: ‘Strange rays’ crowdsourced on social media shed light on black hole illumination. “Unlike most scientific research, the team observing IC 5063’s strange rays assembled in a peculiar fashion: via crowd sourcing on social media. In December 2019, space image processing expert and citizen scientist Judy Schmidt noticed strange cones while processing an image of IC 5063, at first wondering if they were real, and if they were, whether they were galaxy-sized shadows, star streams, or something else.”

The Canberra Times: The world’s largest camera and most exciting telescope are nearly here

The Canberra Times: The world’s largest camera and most exciting telescope are nearly here. “Making telescopes larger allows you to see fainter and therefore more distant objects but it doesn’t help you catch a supernova explosion if you are not pointing the telescope in the right direction. The Rubin Observatory solves this problem with a telescope design that allows for a very large field-of-view of 10 square degrees, 40 times the size of the full moon. This is also why it needs such a large camera – to be able to capture the details of such a huge part of the sky.”

The Hutchinson News: Cosmosphere creating digitally interactive 3D model of Liberty Bell 7

The Hutchinson News: Cosmosphere creating digitally interactive 3D model of Liberty Bell 7. “Space students from ages 1 to 101 will be able to get close enough to see rivets on spacecrafts, all from their home computers, thanks to a new 3D imaging project at the Cosmosphere. Last week, the Cosmosphere began creating high-resolution, full-color, digitally interactive 3D models of the space museum’s collection starting with one of its most iconic crafts — the Mercury spacecraft Liberty Bell 7.”