Puerto Rico: Iconic Arecibo Observatory telescope collapses (BBC)

BBC: Puerto Rico: Iconic Arecibo Observatory telescope collapses. “A huge radio telescope in Puerto Rico has collapsed after decades of astronomical discoveries. The US National Science Foundation (NSF) said the telescope’s 900-ton instrument platform fell onto a reflector dish some 450ft (137m) below. It came just weeks after officials announced that the telescope would be dismantled amid safety fears, following damage to its support system.”

Phys .org: ‘Strange rays’ crowdsourced on social media shed light on black hole illumination

Phys .org: ‘Strange rays’ crowdsourced on social media shed light on black hole illumination. “Unlike most scientific research, the team observing IC 5063’s strange rays assembled in a peculiar fashion: via crowd sourcing on social media. In December 2019, space image processing expert and citizen scientist Judy Schmidt noticed strange cones while processing an image of IC 5063, at first wondering if they were real, and if they were, whether they were galaxy-sized shadows, star streams, or something else.”

AP: Cable failures endanger renowned Puerto Rico radio telescope

AP: Cable failures endanger renowned Puerto Rico radio telescope. “The giant, aging cables that support one of the world’s largest single-dish radio telescopes are slowly unraveling in this U.S. territory, pushing an observatory renowned for its key role in astronomical discoveries to the brink of collapse.”

The Canberra Times: The world’s largest camera and most exciting telescope are nearly here

The Canberra Times: The world’s largest camera and most exciting telescope are nearly here. “Making telescopes larger allows you to see fainter and therefore more distant objects but it doesn’t help you catch a supernova explosion if you are not pointing the telescope in the right direction. The Rubin Observatory solves this problem with a telescope design that allows for a very large field-of-view of 10 square degrees, 40 times the size of the full moon. This is also why it needs such a large camera – to be able to capture the details of such a huge part of the sky.”

The Hutchinson News: Cosmosphere creating digitally interactive 3D model of Liberty Bell 7

The Hutchinson News: Cosmosphere creating digitally interactive 3D model of Liberty Bell 7. “Space students from ages 1 to 101 will be able to get close enough to see rivets on spacecrafts, all from their home computers, thanks to a new 3D imaging project at the Cosmosphere. Last week, the Cosmosphere began creating high-resolution, full-color, digitally interactive 3D models of the space museum’s collection starting with one of its most iconic crafts — the Mercury spacecraft Liberty Bell 7.”

The Next Web: AI helps produce world’s largest 3D map of the universe

The Next Web: AI helps produce world’s largest 3D map of the universe. “Scientists at the University of Hawaii’s Mānoa Institute for Astronomy (IfA) have used AI to produce the world’s largest 3D catalog of stars, galaxies, and quasars. The team developed the map using an optical survey of three-quarters of the sky produced by the Pan-STARRS observatory on Haleakalā, Maui.”

Volunteers wanted: NASA’s Planet Patrol wants your help to find alien worlds (Space)

Space: Volunteers wanted: NASA’s Planet Patrol wants your help to find alien worlds. “You can help NASA’s newest planet-hunting mission do its otherworldly work. The space agency just launched a citizen-science project called Planet Patrol, which asks volunteers around the world to sort through images collected by the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS).”

CNET: Astronomy Photographer of the Year winners revel in the beauty of space

CNET: Astronomy Photographer of the Year winners revel in the beauty of space. “If you want a reminder of just how gorgeous our universe is, then take some time to browse the winners of the 2020 Insight Investment Astronomy Photographer of the Year competition. From an artful aurora to the surface of the sun, these images capture the enduring beauty of the cosmos.”

NASA: NASA’s Chandra Opens Treasure Trove of Cosmic Delights

NASA: NASA’s Chandra Opens Treasure Trove of Cosmic Delights. “Humanity has “eyes” that can detect all different types of light through telescopes around the globe and a fleet of observatories in space. From radio waves to gamma rays, this ‘multiwavelength’ approach to astronomy is crucial to getting a complete understanding of objects in space. This compilation gives examples of images from different missions and telescopes being combined to better understand the science of the universe. Each of these images contains data from NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory as well as other telescopes. Various types of objects are shown (galaxies, supernova remnants, stars, planetary nebulas), but together they demonstrate the possibilities when data from across the electromagnetic spectrum are assembled.”

The Dish: Australia’s Most Famous Radio Telescope Added to Heritage List (Gizmodo)

Gizmodo: The Dish: Australia’s Most Famous Radio Telescope Added to Heritage List. “The CSIRO’s Parkes Observatory, known colloquially as The Dish, will be the 118th entry to the National Heritage List, joining the ranks of Australia’s most iconic attractions, including the Great Barrier Reef and the Sydney Opera House.”

Nature: Migrating big astronomy data to the cloud

Nature: Migrating big astronomy data to the cloud. “Astronomers typically work by asking observatories for time on a telescope and downloading the resulting data. But as the amount of data that telescopes produce grows, well, astronomically, old methods can’t keep pace. The Vera C. Rubin Observatory in Chile is geared up to collect 20 terabytes per night as part of its 10-year Legacy Survey of Space and Time (LSST), once it becomes operational in 2022. That’s as much as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey — which created the most detailed 3D maps of the Universe so far — collected in total between 2000 and 2010.”

NASA: ‘Disk Detective’ Needs Your Help Finding Disks Where Planets Form

NASA: ‘Disk Detective’ Needs Your Help Finding Disks Where Planets Form. “Planets form from gas and dust particles swirling around baby stars in enormous spinning disks. But because this process takes millions of years, scientists can only learn about these disks by finding and studying a lot of different examples. Through a project called Disk Detective, you can help. Anyone, regardless of background or prior knowledge, can assist scientists in figuring out the mysteries of planet formation. Disk Detective is an example of citizen science, a collaboration between professional scientists and members of the public.”

Phys .org: University students develop AI to detect fast radio bursts

Phys .org: University students develop AI to detect fast radio bursts. “West Virginia University’s Duncan Lorimer might be the godfather of the fast radio burst, but a pair of international students has taken exploring these mysterious cosmic flashes to a new level. In 2007, Lorimer was credited for helping discover fast radio bursts—intense, unexplained pulses of energy, light years away, that pop for mere milliseconds. Ever since, only around 100 have been spotted.”

CNET: 7 best stargazing apps for spotting constellations in the night sky

CNET: 7 best stargazing apps for spotting constellations in the night sky. “My husband and I are far enough out in the country to see stars, but we haven’t completely escaped the city’s light pollution. Every so often before we turn in for the night, we’ll step out onto the back porch if the sky is clear, and look up. We’ve seen a shockingly bright Venus, the ISS streak by and a few shooting stars — thanks in part to the help of some apps.”

Michigan Live: How to ‘look up together’ while social distancing during International Dark Sky Week

Michigan Live: How to ‘look up together’ while social distancing during International Dark Sky Week. “During International Dark Sky Week, recognized this year from April 19-26, the International Dark-Sky Association is encouraging everyone who’s homebound to ‘look up together’ and learn more about astronomy, cultural connections to the stars, and the importance of limiting light pollution — an increasing threat which has impacted everything from firefly populations and bird migration to human circadian rhythms.”