Digital Trends: Browse hundreds of images of Mars captured by ESA’s Mars Express webcam

Digital Trends: Browse hundreds of images of Mars captured by ESA’s Mars Express webcam. “If you’ve ever wanted to get a close-up look at Mars, the European Space Agency (ESA) has just released a treasure trove of images. Captured by the Visual Monitoring Camera (VMC) instrument onboard the Mars Express orbiter, these images come from data captured between 2007 and this year, in addition to observations of the release of the Beagle 2 lander in 2003.”

NASA: NASA’s Chandra Opens Treasure Trove of Cosmic Delights

NASA: NASA’s Chandra Opens Treasure Trove of Cosmic Delights. “Humanity has “eyes” that can detect all different types of light through telescopes around the globe and a fleet of observatories in space. From radio waves to gamma rays, this ‘multiwavelength’ approach to astronomy is crucial to getting a complete understanding of objects in space. This compilation gives examples of images from different missions and telescopes being combined to better understand the science of the universe. Each of these images contains data from NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory as well as other telescopes. Various types of objects are shown (galaxies, supernova remnants, stars, planetary nebulas), but together they demonstrate the possibilities when data from across the electromagnetic spectrum are assembled.”

Hubble Space Telescope: Announcing the Hubble Space Telescope Hidden Gems

Hubble Space Telescope: Announcing the Hubble Space Telescope Hidden Gems. “In April 2020, the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope will celebrate 30 years since its launch. ESA/Hubble has produced a commemorative calendar of the telescope’s Hidden Gems that is now available for everyone to use and enjoy.”

Ars Technica: Finding stars that vanished—by scouring old photos

Ars Technica: Finding stars that vanished—by scouring old photos. “Before the advent of digital imaging, astronomy was done using photographic plates. The results look a bit like biology experiments gone bad (of which I’ve perpetrated more than a few), with a sea of dark speckles of different intensities scattered randomly about. To separate the real stars from any noise, astronomers would take multiple images, often at different colors, and analyze the results by eye before labeling anything an actual star. Sounds tough, but by 50 years ago, astronomers had already managed to catalog hundreds of millions of stars in all areas of the sky.”