Thrillist: The Best Atlanta Art Experiences You Can Enjoy From Home

Thrillist: The Best Atlanta Art Experiences You Can Enjoy From Home. “Quarantine life has given us the chance to run through shows that we never would have time for and try food from local restaurants that we’ve never visited, but it’s also presented an opportunity to stimulate our creativity and escape the monotony of staying indoors. As 20th-century writer Thomas Merton once wrote, ‘Art enables us to find ourselves and lose ourselves at the same time.’ At times like this, we need inspiration, and these museums, galleries, and arts establishments in Atlanta are virtually supplying it.”

A Powerful New Community Resource to Explore Atlanta’s 1960s History: Introducing the Mayor Ivan Allen Jr. Digital Archive (Atlanta Studies)

Atlanta Studies: A Powerful New Community Resource to Explore Atlanta’s 1960s History: Introducing the Mayor Ivan Allen Jr. Digital Archive. “‘With unflinching courage, he guided this city through some of its most turbulent waters,’ Coretta Scott King once said of Ivan Allen Jr., Atlanta’s 52nd mayor who oversaw her husband’s funeral before the eyes of the world.1 In office from 1962-1970, Allen governed during a transformative period in the city’s history, a crucial phase of development marked by economic dynamism.”

Atlanta police: Cyberattack erased dashcam archive (Miami Herald)

Miami Herald: Atlanta police: Cyberattack erased dashcam archive. “The Atlanta Police Department’s archive of dashboard camera video was wiped out in a March cyberattack, the police chief said. The loss might compromise a drunken driving case, Chief Erika Shields told the Atlanta Journal-Constitution and WSB-TV , but she’s not greatly worried.”

Emory Center for Digital Scholarship: New online portal honors African American WWI soldiers at historic Atlanta cemetery

Emory Center for Digital Scholarship: New online portal honors African American WWI soldiers at historic Atlanta cemetery. “Oakland Cemetery is a microcosm of Atlanta history. Examining the lives of individuals buried at the downtown site provides a window onto the families, institutions, and social forces that have shaped Georgia’s capital since the cemetery opened in 1850. There are some well-known individuals buried at Oakland — author Margaret Mitchell, Mayor Maynard Jackson, golfer Bobby Jones — but most present-day Atlantans probably wouldn’t recognize the vast majority of names of the more than 70,000 people buried there. Seeking new ways to extend its educational outreach, the nonprofit Historic Oakland Foundation has partnered with the Emory Center for Digital Scholarship (ECDS) to create a prototype for an interactive online exhibition.”

AJC: New website provides street art map to murals all over Atlanta

AJC: New website provides street art map to murals all over Atlanta . “Atlanta wears its street art like a brilliant, colorful badge of honor. In some neighborhoods, one would be hard-pressed to find a wall that hasn’t already been commandeered by one of many notable artists. Atlanta Street Art Map, created by a man aptly-named Art Rudick, is a website that documents as much of the city’s street art as possible. The retired engineer became interested in the medium during a walking tour of Bushwick in New York and now maintains the site as a hobby, the website says.”

CJR: ‘It does not feel like transparency’: Atlanta dumps 1.47 million pages of public records

From Columbia Journalism Review, with a thanks to Wallace S. for the heads-up: ‘It does not feel like transparency’: Atlanta dumps 1.47 million pages of public records. “The scene [in Black Orpheus] draws an eerie portrait of the impossibility of finding information or human value in a bureaucracy bloated with paper. It came to mind recently after a singular decision by the City of Atlanta to release 1.47 million pages of documents to the press and public—on paper. Mayor Kasim Reed announced the release in a February 9 press conference, after weeks of dithering over open records requests by local media regarding a federal investigation into more than $1 million in bribes for city contracts.” Obstructive, mean-spirited, or ignorant of digital redacting techniques?