New York Times: How Crowdsourcing Aided a Push to Preserve the Histories of Nazi Victims

New York Times: How Crowdsourcing Aided a Push to Preserve the Histories of Nazi Victims. “While the coronavirus pandemic has painfully upended lives and businesses around the world, the lockdowns it caused are providing a unique boost for one group’s effort to help heal a generations-old wound: Nazi atrocities. As the virus prompted lockdowns across Europe, the director of the Arolsen Archives — the world’s largest devoted to the victims of Nazi persecution — joined millions of others working remotely from home and spending lots more time in front of her computer.”

Carnegie Mellon University: Machine Learning Tool Helps Human Rights Workers Seek Justice

Carnegie Mellon University: Machine Learning Tool Helps Human Rights Workers Seek Justice. “Interdisciplinary researchers at CMU created a tool that can scan thousands of hours of multimedia in a matter of minutes. It can help human rights practitioners build cases against war criminals.”

North Korea: how public execution sites are being mapped with Google Earth satellite images (The Conversation)

The Conversation: North Korea: how public execution sites are being mapped with Google Earth satellite images. “The researchers show North Korean escapees Google Earth satellite images of areas of the country where the escapees either lived or spent considerable periods of time. Focusing on images dating from around the time the reported events took place, where available, researchers then ask interviewees to point out the locations of any killing or body disposal sites of which they have knowledge.”

NPR: Is Genocide Predictable? Researchers Say Absolutely

NPR: Is Genocide Predictable? Researchers Say Absolutely. “Since 2014, the Holocaust Museum and scholars from Dartmouth have mapped the conditions that precede a genocide. They built a database of every mass killing since World War II. Then they went back and looked at the conditions in the countries where the killings occurred just prior to the attacks. And now they use that computer model to analyze which nations currently are at greatest risk.”

Ahval: Turkish historian launches digital archive documenting Armenian genocide

Ahval: Turkish historian launches digital archive documenting Armenian genocide. “Turkish historian Taner Akçam, a professor of Armenian genocide studies at Clark University in Massachusetts, has launched a digital archive of evidence collected by an Armenian genocide survivor which documents the atrocities of 1915…. [The archive] contains thousands of original Ottoman documents and Guerguerian’s unpublished writings, including the handwritten memoirs of Naim Bey, an Ottoman bureaucrat stationed in Aleppo who actively participated in the deportation and massacres of Armenians and documents from the Jerusalem Armenian Patriarchate containing first-hand information about the Armenian genocide.”

Science Blog: Digital Map Helps Historians Get Granular With Holocaust Research

Science Blog: Digital Map Helps Historians Get Granular With Holocaust Research. “Looking at the list of names on Waitman Beorn’s computer screen is staggering. The eye blurs almost automatically as it searches through the 18,000 people – recorded by name, approximate birthdate and address – on the list compiled by the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. Yet, these 18,000 are only a small fraction of the nearly 160,000 Jews who were placed into forced labor or systematically murdered under the brutal Nazi rule in Lviv, Ukraine.”

Wired: When YouTube Removes Violent Videos, It Impedes Justice

Wired: When YouTube Removes Violent Videos, It Impedes Justice. “When the International Criminal Court issued an arrest warrant for Mahmoud al-Werfelli in August for the war crime of murder in Libya, it marked a watershed moment for open-source investigations. For those of us who embrace the promise of the digital landscape for justice and accountability, it came as welcome validation that content found on Facebook and YouTube form a good deal of the evidence before the Court. But this relatively new path to justice is at risk of becoming a dead-end.”

Khmer Times: New website aims to educate youth on Khmer Rouge regime

Khmer Times: New website aims to educate youth on Khmer Rouge regime. “The Documentation Center of Cambodia (DC-Cam) launched its new multimedia website on Friday, specifically aimed at educating and informing Cambodia’s youth about the Khmer Rouge regime. The website is aimed at shedding light on Cambodia’s darkest period of history, drawing from DC-Cam’s extensive photographic, audiovisual and witness testimony archive to paint a vivid picture young Cambodians can explore on their smartphones.”

Rwanda: Digitilisation of Gacaca Archives to Be Completed By June 2018 (AllAfrica)

All Africa: Rwanda: Digitilisation of Gacaca Archives to Be Completed By June 2018. “Work is being fast-tracked to ensure that the ongoing scanning and digitalisation of 63 million copies of Gacaca courts’s archives are completed in June next year. Dr Jean Damascène Bizimana, the Executive Secretary of the National Commission for the Fight against Genocide (CNLG) said this Tuesday as officials from CNLG and Aegis Trust, the British NGO which campaigns to prevent genocide worldwide, gave journalists a guided tour of the stores where they are kept at the Rwanda National Police headquarters in Kacyiru.”

Vanguard (Nigeria): Obaseki proposes Global Database for Victims of Enforced Disappearances

Vanguard (Nigeria): Obaseki proposes Global Database for Victims of Enforced Disappearances. “The Governor of Edo State, Mr. Godwin Obaseki has made a case for a global digital database that will have the information of victims of enforced disappearances across the world. Obaseki made the recommendation on the occasion of the United Nations International Day of the Victims of Enforced Disappearances, observed on August 30, each year.” If you’re not familiar with the term “enforced disappearance,” Amnesty International can break it down for you..