Ars Technica: Thousands of AT&T customers in the US infected by new data-stealing malware

Ars Technica: Thousands of AT&T customers in the US infected by new data-stealing malware. “Thousands of networking devices belonging to AT&T Internet subscribers in the US have been infected with newly discovered malware that allows the devices to be used in denial-of-service attacks and attacks on internal networks, researchers said on Tuesday. The device model under attack is the EdgeMarc Enterprise Session Border Controller, an appliance used by small- to medium-sized enterprises to secure and manage phone calls, video conferencing, and similar real-time communications.”

Bleeping Computer: AT&T denies data breach after hacker auctions 70 million user database

Bleeping Computer: AT&T denies data breach after hacker auctions 70 million user database. “From the samples shared by the threat actor, the database contains customers’ names, addresses, phone numbers, Social Security numbers, and date of birth. A security researcher who wishes to remain anonymous told BleepingComputer that two of the four people in the samples were confirmed to have accounts on att.com. Other than these few details, not much is known about the database, how it was acquired, and whether it is authentic.”

PC World: Data caps on AT&T, Comcast, T-Mobile will return after June 30

PC World: Data caps on AT&T, Comcast, T-Mobile will return after June 30. “Major Internet service providers are scheduled to end their quarantine benefits soon, once again subjecting Americans to data caps and removing protections if they are unable to pay their bills. They’re scheduled to expire at the end of June, meaning that July 1 will see the return of data caps to some major ISPs.”

Courthouse News: Class Claims AT&T Sold Their Real-Time Locations to Bounty Hunters

Courthouse News: Class Claims AT&T Sold Their Real-Time Locations to Bounty Hunters. “Despite assurances to the contrary, AT&T has been selling its customers’ location data to creditors, bounty hunters, landlords, prison officials, and all sorts of third parties, according to data privacy watchdog Electronic Frontier Foundation in a federal class action filed Tuesday.”

Engadget: US carriers say they’ve stopped selling location data

Engadget: US carriers say they’ve stopped selling location data. “You might not have to worry quite so much about carriers selling your phone location data to less-than-diligent third parties. AT&T, Sprint, T-Mobile and Verizon (Engadget’s parent company) have provided responses to FCC Commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel’s request for an update on the practice, with all four saying they’d halted sales to aggregators sometime after promising to do so back in June 2018. “

Ars Technica: Refunds for 300 million phone users sought in lawsuits over location-data sales

Ars Technica: Refunds for 300 million phone users sought in lawsuits over location-data sales. “The four major US wireless carriers are facing proposed class-action lawsuits accusing them of violating federal law by selling their customers’ real-time location data to third parties. The complaints seeking class action status and financial damages were filed last week against AT&T, Verizon, T-Mobile, and Sprint in US District Court for the District of Maryland.”

Motherboard: Hundreds of Bounty Hunters Had Access to AT&T, T-Mobile, and Sprint Customer Location Data for Years

Motherboard: Hundreds of Bounty Hunters Had Access to AT&T, T-Mobile, and Sprint Customer Location Data for Years. “Around 250 bounty hunters and related businesses had access to AT&T, T-Mobile, and Sprint customer location data, with one bail bond firm using the phone location service more than 18,000 times, and others using it thousands or tens of thousands of times, according to internal documents obtained by Motherboard from a company called CerCareOne, a now-defunct location data seller that operated until 2017. The documents list not only the companies that had access to the data, but specific phone numbers that were pinged by those companies.”

New York Times: AT&T to Advertise on YouTube Again After a Nearly 2-Year Holdout

New York Times: AT&T to Advertise on YouTube Again After a Nearly 2-Year Holdout. “AT&T thinks YouTube is safe for advertisers again. The company, one of the nation’s biggest marketers, yanked its dollars from YouTube in 2017 because its ads were appearing alongside offensive videos. But on Friday, AT&T said it had been persuaded to resume advertising on the video platform.”

The Register: AT&T, Sprint, Verizon, T-Mobile US pledge, again, to not sell your location to shady geezers. Sorry, we don’t believe them

The Register: AT&T, Sprint, Verizon, T-Mobile US pledge, again, to not sell your location to shady geezers. Sorry, we don’t believe them. “US cellphone networks have promised – again – that they will stop selling records of their subscribers’ whereabouts to anyone willing to cough up cash.” I don’t believe them either.

CNET: Trump admin reportedly meeting with Facebook, Google to craft web privacy rights

CNET: Trump admin reportedly meeting with Facebook, Google to craft web privacy rights. “An online privacy protection proposal may see the light of day this fall. The Trump administration is working on a proposal to protect internet users’ privacy, The Washington Post reported. The Commerce Department has been meeting with representatives from Facebook , Google , AT&T , Comcast and other tech companies, as well as consumer advocates over the past month, according to the report.”

Consumer Watchdog: Google’s First-Quarter Lobbying Expenditures top $5 million; AT&T, Comcast Each Surpass $4 Million (PR Newswire PRESS RELEASE)

PR Newswire: Consumer Watchdog: Google’s First-Quarter Lobbying Expenditures top $5 million; AT&T, Comcast Each Surpass $4 Million (PRESS RELEASE). “Google’s lobbying expenditures in the first quarter of this year topped $5 million, as the Internet giant sought to influence federal policymakers on issues including online privacy, competition, online advertising and online sex-trafficking, Consumer Watchdog said today. Google increased its 2018 first-quarter federal lobbying a whopping 42.6 percent, spending $5.02 million compared to $3.52 million spent in the comparable 2017 period. Among 18 major technology and communications companies tracked by Consumer Watchdog, Google spent the most on lobbying, according to mandatory disclosure reports filed Friday with the Clerk of the U.S. House of Representatives.”