Toledo Blade: All fish stories turn out to be keepers

Toledo Blade: All fish stories turn out to be keepers. “South Dakota angler Buddy Seiner has created FishStories…. as an international storehouse to preserve the voices of fishermen talking about the sport they love and the people that share the experience with them. His is the first online audio archive dedicated specifically to anglers.” I took a quick look and this is a wow. I do have concerns that there don’t appear to be transcripts available for the oral histories.

Cornell: Scientists, wildlife DJ, hip-hop archivists create ‘BeastBox’

Cornell: Scientists, wildlife DJ, hip-hop archivists create ‘BeastBox’. “Musicians have long drawn inspiration from nature, but a new online game is taking that connection one step further. ‘Beastbox’ takes sound clips from real wild animals, transforms them into loops, and allows users to mix and match them into an endless variety of beats, breaks and drops. Along the way, players learn about the animals and the ecosystems they belong to.”

The Next Web: Turning big data into sound

The Next Web: Turning big data into sound. “A collaboration between two professors – one of music and one of engineering – at Virginia Tech resulted in the creation of a new platform for data analysis that makes it possible to understand data better by turning it into sound. This is a pioneering approach to studying spatially distributed data which instead of placing information into a visual context to show patterns or correlations – meaning, data visualization – uses an aural environment to leverage the natural affordances of the space and the user’s location within the sound field.”

Twitter tool turns your tweets into an ever-evolving playlist: What’s your Twitter soundtrack? (Alphr)

Alphr: Twitter tool turns your tweets into an ever-evolving playlist: What’s your Twitter soundtrack?. “Called Social Song, the tool lets you type any Twitter username into it before analysing tweets based on the use of emoji, use of words that convey a certain sentiment (such as happiness or anger), and images that contain certain facial expressions.” This is a nice idea, but every time I tried a different Twitter handle I got music that sounded like the soundtrack of an establishing shot for a Lifetime movie set in New England.

Google Blog: Introducing the new Google Play Music

Google Blog: Introducing the new Google Play Music. “Whether reminding you to leave to catch your flight, helping you find pictures of your daughter’s recital, or suggesting the right Smart Reply, Google builds tools that help you make the world of information more accessible and useful. And at Google Play Music, we strive for the same. Building on our commitment to help you find the right music for any moment, today we’re introducing the new Google Play Music — a fresh take on our music streaming service that is smarter, easier to use, and much more assistive.”

Hannah Hethmon: Every Museum Podcast in One Big List

Hannah Hethmon: Every Museum Podcast in One Big List. “My own podcast about Icelandic museums, Museums in Strange Places, has given me the chance to see ‘behind-the-curtain’ in so many amazing museums, and if I’ve learned one thing, it’s that museums are leaving so many of their most human and compelling stories untold. Since it’s through podcasting that I’ve discovered these stories, I started to wonder how museums around the world were using podcasting to have a more intimate platform for telling stories and engaging their audience. To that end, I scoured all the podcasting platforms and reached out to the Twitterverse and Facebook groups to compile the most complete list of podcasts by museums on the internet.” Oh, WOW.

Kansas State Collegian: K-State Libraries donate thousands of records to digital archive

Kansas State Collegian: K-State Libraries donate thousands of records to digital archive. “Faculty in K-State special collections department knew of The Great 78 Project before getting involved, [Keli] Rylance said. During the 2016-2017 academic year, faculty combed through their collections and decided two would be good candidates for the project. Rylance then contacted the project’s developer at the Archive of Contemporary Music in New York to arrange a partnership. Since then, students have joined faculty in preparing the nearly 8,000 sides of audio for shipment to George Blood, an audio and visual digitisation company in Philadelphia.”