TechCrunch: Facebook officially launches Live Audio Rooms and podcasts in the U.S.

TechCrunch: Facebook officially launches Live Audio Rooms and podcasts in the U.S.. “In April, Facebook announced a series of planned investments in new audio products, including a Clubhouse live audio competitor as well as new support for podcasts. Today, Facebook is officially rolling these products with the launch of Live Audio Rooms in the U.S. on iOS, starting with public figures and select Facebook Groups, and the debut of an initial set of U.S. podcast partners.”

Your Guide to Social Audio: Clubhouse and Other Voice-Based Social Media (Voices)

Voices: Your Guide to Social Audio: Clubhouse and Other Voice-Based Social Media. “From a trending invite-only audio app to existing social platforms that have set out to capitalize on the growing consumer interest in voice-based social experiences, audio has stepped up to the new frontier of social media—and it’s making a lot of ears perk up. But is social audio simply a flash in the pan? Or will it resonate for years to come? Let’s take a look at the biggest media platforms that are making pioneering strides in the social audio space.”

Your Guide to Social Audio: Clubhouse and Other Voice-Based Social Media (Voices)

Voices: Your Guide to Social Audio: Clubhouse and Other Voice-Based Social Media. “From a trending invite-only audio app to existing social platforms that have set out to capitalize on the growing consumer interest in voice-based social experiences, audio has stepped up to the new frontier of social media—and it’s making a lot of ears perk up. But is social audio simply a flash in the pan? Or will it resonate for years to come? Let’s take a look at the biggest media platforms that are making pioneering strides in the social audio space.”

ABC News (Australia): National Film and Sound Archive offering up some of its international collection of records, cylinders

From ABC News in Australia, and I swear I did not plan for these two stories to go side by side: National Film and Sound Archive offering up some of its international collection of records, cylinders. “The National Film and Sound Archive (NFSA) in Canberra is offering up 77 pallets of international sound material which curators say do not fit within the scope of their collection. The archive’s head of collection, Jacqui Uhlmann, says there are thousands of old records, wax cylinders and a MasterTouch Collection of international pianola rolls up for grabs.”

Wired: Everything You Need to Know Before You Join Clubhouse

Wired: Everything You Need to Know Before You Join Clubhouse. “As with any social media service, there will always be a variety of personalities. Some rooms draw inspiration and creativity. Others may have not-so-forthcoming folks who would love to talk to you about a business opportunity. In those terms, it’s similar to Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram. It depends on who and when. But for many, Clubhouse is simply a new opportunity to connect with others. It’s a place to just listen, or if given the chance, to speak directly with another human being in real time. It’s an instant discussion, a conversation without the keyboard. Voice is the only thing that matters—literally.”

World Economic Forum: This innovative project fuses journalism and music to highlight lawlessness at sea

World Economic Forum: This innovative project fuses journalism and music to highlight lawlessness at sea. ” All of that time spent at sea allowed me to build an audio library of field recordings. It featured a variety of textured and rhythmic sounds like machine-gun fire off the coast of Somalia and chanting captive deckhands on the South China Sea. Using the sound archive and inspired by the reporting, over 400 artists from more than 60 countries are producing EPs in their own interpretive musical styles, be it electronic, ambient, classical or hip-hop. Many artists also used the reported footage to make their own videos tied to their song, including Louis Futon, Roger Molls, and De Osos.” This is really good. Major timesink.

TechCrunch: AI-driven audio cloning startup gives voice to Einstein chatbot

TechCrunch: AI-driven audio cloning startup gives voice to Einstein chatbot. “You’ll need to prick up your ears for this slice of deepfakery emerging from the wacky world of synthesized media: A digital version of Albert Einstein — with a synthesized voice that’s been (re)created using AI voice cloning technology drawing on audio recordings of the famous scientist’s actual voice.”

Vox: Facebook plans to go after Clubhouse — and podcasts — with a suite of new audio products

Vox: Facebook plans to go after Clubhouse — and podcasts — with a suite of new audio products. “Facebook wants you to start talking, and listening, on Facebook. Sources say the social network is planning to announce a series of products — some of which won’t appear for some time — under the umbrella of ‘social audio’ on Monday. They include Facebook’s take on Clubhouse, the audio-only social network that grew rapidly last year, as well a push into podcast discovery and distribution, aided by Spotify.”

New York Times: 5 Ways to Tap Into Your Smartphone’s Audio Powers

New York Times: 5 Ways to Tap Into Your Smartphone’s Audio Powers. “It has been a decade since Apple integrated Siri right into its iPhone software and mainstreamed the voice-activated assistant. But the assistant is just one of the voice-powered tools in your smartphone’s ever-growing audio toolbox. Your device can also be a digital recorder, a dictation machine, a podcast production studio and more. Here’s how to get things done with more talking and less typing.”

Tubefilter: YouTube Testing Language Dubbing Tool, Enabling Viewers To Toggle Between Multiple ‘Audio Tracks’

Tubefilter: YouTube Testing Language Dubbing Tool, Enabling Viewers To Toggle Between Multiple ‘Audio Tracks’. “A YouTube spokesperson confirms to Tubefilter that the platform is piloting a new feature among a small group of creators that allows them to upload multiple ‘Audio Tracks‘ to a single video — which viewers can then toggle between.”

Bad broadband, no problem: Google’s open-source speech codec works on even low-quality networks (ZDNet)

ZDNet: Bad broadband, no problem: Google’s open-source speech codec works on even low-quality networks. “In a bid to put an end to the all-too-familiar choppy, robotic voice calls that come with low bandwidth, Google is open-sourcing Lyra, a new audio codec that taps machine learning to produce high-quality calls even when faced with a dodgy internet connection.”