Poynter: A new game puts the public into public radio archives

Poynter: A new game puts the public into public radio archives. “The game, called Fix It, was launched by the American Archive of Public Broadcasting, a collaboration between the Library of Congress and the WGBH Educational Foundation. It asks the public for help in identifying and correcting errors in public media transcripts — which improves both the searchability and accessibility of archival material from the collection.”

TechCrunch: Ambient noise could be your next multi-factor authentication token

TechCrunch: Ambient noise could be your next multi-factor authentication token. “We’re all pretty used to two-factor authentication now, and it isn’t much of an inconvenience to have to type in a four-digit code when you log in from a new location. But some Swiss security researchers came up with a smart way to authenticate without even that tiny amount of work: ambient noise.”

New Web Site Archives Oral History of Holocaust Survivors in Rochester, New York Area

A new Web site has archived oral histories of Holocaust survivors in the Rochester, New York area. “The website is now live, though is undergoing some changes before a public ceremony with its official unveiling on Sunday at the annual Holocaust remembrance program, known in Hebrew as Yom HaShoah…. The online archive includes the stories of more than 200 Holocaust survivors, some who are now deceased but whose accounts were earlier preserved.”

British Library: Unlocking Our Sound Heritage

From the British Library: Unlocking our Sound Heritage. “The British Library is today launching Unlocking Our Sound Heritage, a major preservation and access project which has received a £9.5m National Lottery grant. This builds on the generous support of other donors and funders, meaning that the total project funding of £18.8 million is now in place. The funding will enable the formation of the first ever national network of ten sound preservation centres. This network will now come together with the British Library to save almost half a million rare and unique recordings that are threatened by physical degradation or stored on formats that can no longer be played.”

The Saturday Paper: Restoring the National Film and Sound Archive

The Saturday Paper: Restoring the National Film and Sound Archive. “Today, federal budget cuts mean film preservation – as well as digitisation of rapidly deteriorating television shows on defunct 20th-century magnetic tape formats – is in competition for funding with provision of public access to existing screen works. Ninety years on from Norman Dawn’s cavalier indulgence on Sydney Harbour, Milliken and others argue, Australia’s modern film preservation bureaucracy lacks vision.”

CNET: How to set the volume for alarms and timers on Google Home

CNET: How to set the volume for alarms and timers on Google Home. “Earlier this month, Google added a much-needed feature to its Google Home speaker: volume controls specifically for alarms and timers. Previously, all playback — including music, responses and alarm tones — from Google Home were the same volume. Now you can control alarms and timers independently. Here’s how.”

Network World: Google AudioSet aims to make sounds, from roars to boings, searchable

Network World: Google AudioSet aims to make sounds, from roars to boings, searchable . “Google researchers have released a collection of 2 million-plus labeled audio snippets designed to spark innovation in the area of sound search. The company earlier this month published a paper titled “AudioSet: An ontology and human-labeled dataset for audio events” that it hopes will combine with image recognition to strengthen overall search and identification capabilities that could be used in a wide variety of machine learning applications, including the automation of video captions that include sound effects. Google began work on the project last year.”