NME: New research finds music can be used to hack smartphones, computers and cars

NME: New research finds music can be used to hack smartphones, computers and cars. “The research found that accelerometers – the motion-sensing chip that can be found in many electronic devices – could be hacked using sound waves, with one example being the uploading of a “malicious” music file onto a device. The scientists also found that, once hacked, devices such as the FitBit and a toy car could be manipulated to add steps to the former’s counter and even take over the controls of the latter.”

Complete Music Update: Facebook advertising for Legal Director of Music Licensing

Complete Music Update: Facebook advertising for Legal Director of Music Licensing. “Facebook is continuing to build a new team to sort out music licensing on the social network. Having headhunted Tamara Hrivnak from YouTube in January to work on the social network’s ‘global music strategy’, it’s now advertising for a Legal Director of Music Licensing.”

CNET: All Google Home’s compatible music, podcast and radio services

CNET: All Google Home’s compatible music, podcast and radio services. “Like the Alexa speakers, Google Home’s primary function is streaming audio. After all, it is a speaker — it just has a lot of extra features. You can get your news, listen to your favorite radio station or podcast and listen to music videos. Here are all the music, podcast and radio services that work with Google Home.”

NewAtlas: Posters and t-shirts turned into (very) local FM radio stations

From NewAtlas, wow! Posters and t-shirts turned into (very) local FM radio stations. “What if a band’s poster could actually transmit a sample of their music to your phone, or your t-shirt could monitor your vital signs while you exercise? Researchers at the University of Washington (UW) have pioneered a technique where everyday objects can be embedded with transmitters that piggyback ambient FM signals to send data to nearby smartphones and radios using almost no power.” Can you imagine using this technology in a museum exhibit?

SoundCloud Launches A New Subscription Plan (PRESS RELEASE)

SoundCloud has launched a new subscription plan (PRESS RELEASE). “The new SoundCloud Go plan marks a music industry first by offering a fully on-demand, mid-priced music streaming subscription. SoundCloud Go lets listeners discover, stream and share a constantly expanding mix of more than 120 million tracks from established and emerging artists, offline and ad-free for $4.99 per month. SoundCloud Go+, formerly known as SoundCloud Go, is SoundCloud’s premium subscription offering which gives subscribers full access to more than 150 million tracks, ad-free, offline with no previews for $9.99 per month. Additional exclusive product features for SoundCloud Go+ will be announced later this year.”

MakeUseOf: 7 Easy Ways to Manage Your Podcast Collection

MakeUseOf: 7 Easy Ways to Manage Your Podcast Collection. “One of the frustrating things about podcasts, however, is that not all of them are available on the same platform. For example, you may like listening to podcasts on SoundCloud, but all of the shows you like may not be available on that platform. The key to fixing this problem is collecting your favorite podcasts in one place. “

A Database of Crowdsourced Urban Sounds

I think I remember hearing about this, I can’t find it in the firehose, so here it is, new-to-me (or at least newly remembered): a database of urban sounds. “Since the late 1990s, the London artist Stanza has been mapping sounds from cities across the globe—from New York to Berlin to Tokyo—and asking the public to contribute. ‘I realized that the whole value of putting it online is sharing it with everybody, so I made the database open sourced,’ he says. His online database, Soundcities, launched in the early 2000s; now, it includes thousands of sounds from dozens of cities.”