Strategies for Identifying Songs

Useful from Ubergizmo: strategies for quickly finding a song. “There are online web based service and applications as well that will help you identify a song with the simplest clue. Most of these apps/services are free to use, but some may offer a premium paid version with extra features. In this tutorial, we are going to list down apps/services that will let you identify a song using different factors.”

Archive of Australian Music

Now available: a new digital archive of Australian musical artists. “A new online music archive has been created at the State Library of Western Australia (SLWA) for emerging Perth composers, with a select few also being chosen to break the library’s silence.”

LGBTQ Oral History Archive Underway

In development: a digital archive of LGBTQ oral histories. “[Elspeth] Brown, an associate professor at UTM, is director of The LGBTQ Oral History Digital Collaboratory, a multi-year research project that will create the largest collection of LGBTQ+ oral histories in North America. Known as the Collaboratory, the project explores ‘the histories of trans people, queer women, gay men and lesbians in the U.S. and Canada through the creation of a virtual research meeting place.’ Based at U of T, the project is partnered with Toronto’s Canadian Lesbian and Gay Archives, University of Toronto Libraries and a several community-based archives across North America. Over five years, the Collaboratory will digitize and transcribe existing oral history collections, and create new collections of trans-related materials. It will also develop a digital ‘oral history hub’ of resources, along with a library guide to aid research in the CLGA’s large collection of trans history materials.”

Cornell University Has Completely Digitized its Natural Sounds Archive

Cornell University has fully-digitized its natural sounds archive. “It took archivists a dozen years to complete the monumental task. The collection contains nearly 150,000 digital audio recordings equaling more than 10 terabytes of data with a total run time of 7,513 hours. About 9,000 species are represented. There’s an emphasis on birds, but the collection also includes sounds of whales, elephants, frogs, primates and more.”

Duke U Libraries on Its Radio Haiti Project

Duke University Libraries has a wonderful behind-the-scenes article on its efforts to database and digitize a huge collection of Radio Haiti tapes. “We’re creating rather sweeping controlled vocabulary — describing subjects, names, and places that appear in the archive. Once we’ve put in all this metadata, we can send the more than 3500 tapes off to be cleaned and digitized. These tasks (organizing, typing in data, cross-referencing, labeling, bar-coding, describing, mold-noting), while arguably unglamorous, are necessary groundwork for eventually making the recordings publicly accessible, ensuring that these tapes can speak again, and that Radyo Ayiti pap peri (Radio Haiti will never perish).”

Tinder Used to Debut a Music Track

Tinder? Being used as a platform for an exclusive music release? (PRESS RELEASE). mmmkaaaayyy…. “Starting today through Monday, August 3, Tinder users nationwide will discover a video message from Luke inviting them to be the first to experience his new track. Simply tap the banners on either the top or bottom of the card to receive an exclusive link. Fans will also have the opportunity to pre-order Luke’s latest album, KILL THE LIGHTS, out August 7. Tinder users should have the latest version of the app installed to catch the video.”

Google Voice Has Improved Transcription (Darn)

Google has launched new transcription for Google Voice, thereby removing one of my main sources of workday entertainment. Nobody could be as weird on purpose as my Google Voice transcriptions. “…we asked users if they would kindly share some of their voicemails for research and system improvements. Thanks to those who participated, we are happy to announce an improved voicemail system in Google Voice and Project Fi that delivers more accurate transcriptions. Using a (deep breath) long short-term memory deep recurrent neural network (whew!), we cut our transcription errors by 49%.”

Georgia Digital Archive Adds Georgia Folklore Collection

The Georgia Digital Library has added the Georgia Folklore Collection. “The Georgia Folklore Collection consists primarily of field recordings made by Art Rosenbaum donated to the University of Georgia Libraries Media Archives in 1987. The collection also contains associated collections of sound and video recordings from around Georgia, including those made between 1955 and 1983 by volunteers from the Georgia Folklore Society. Some of the artists represented in the collection include the Tanner family, Reverend Howard Finster, the McIntosh County Shouters, Doodle Thrower and the Golden River Grass, Neal Pattman, Joe Rakestraw, Jake Staggers, the Eller brothers, Doc and Lucy Barnes, Nathaniel and Fleeta Mitchell, R. A. Miller, W. Guy Bruce, Precious Bryant, and many more.”

Crowdfunding Campaign Underway to Save the Reels of Owsley Stanley

A campaign is underway to preserve the reel-to-reel recordings of Owsley “Bear” Stanley. This is going to be a huge endeavor as there are over 1300 reels and they’re kind of racing against time at this point before the reels degrade. “Although our campaign opens with a goal of $10,000, that’s just the start. The cost of digitally preserving these recordings is estimated to be US $300,000 to US $400,000 to fund two to four years of professional sound engineers’ studio time. Much of the work is a labor of love, but there is simply too much to do and not enough time for just unpaid volunteers.”

The Edublogger: How to Embed Just About Anything

Nice roundup from The Edublogger: how to embed just about anything. “Embedding videos, photos, or other types of content in your blog posts is a relatively simple way to enhance your posts with informative, attention-grabbing content. In this round up post, we’ll share posts from the Edublogs community (and beyond) explaining how to embed just about anything into your blog!”

Bing’s Homepage Now Has Sound

Bing’s homepage now has sound. This is cool as long as it’s not autoplay. “…when you visit us for your daily dose of surprise and delight, look for the audio icon on the bottom-right of screen to know if you can hear the homepage that day—sound is off by default so you can choose when and where to listen. If you want to learn more about today’s video and the geese calls captured by the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, click on the camera icon, also on the bottom-right. This will take you to Bing’s Backstage, where we give you more information about the daily image.”