9 News Australia: Inside the lives of Australia’s ‘Yowie Hunters’

New-to-me, from 9 News Australia: Inside the lives of Australia’s ‘Yowie Hunters’. “Dean Harrison packs his camping gear, binoculars and thermal imagery camera, about to lead a multi-day expedition through south-east Queensland’s rainforests in search of the Australian Yowie. He’s known as the country’s leading Yowie expert among cryptozoology circles, and has been tracking the elusive and controversial creature for over 24 years. Now 52, Mr Harrison describes the encounter he believes changed his life, inspiring him to create the world’s first and most comprehensive online database, dedicated to finding the Yowie, known as Australia’s ‘Big Foot.’”

University of Virginia: Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection Launches Book And Virtual Exhibition

University of Virginia: Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection Launches Book And Virtual Exhibition. “A new book and website tell the story of a small group of Aboriginal artists from Australia who changed the face of global art history – and the resources were produced by the only museum dedicated to Aboriginal Australian art in the United States, the University of Virginia’s Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection.”

ABC News (Australia): Wikipedia ‘edit-a-thons’ set to amplify Australian music scene’s Wikipedia presence

ABC News (Australia): Wikipedia ‘edit-a-thons’ set to amplify Australian music scene’s Wikipedia presence . “The Record — Australian Music on Wikipedia is holding the first of four events as part of Melbourne Music week this Saturday at the Collingwood Yards. The idea is to train volunteers to edit or create new Wikipedia articles about the domestic music scene to increase its visibility worldwide.”

ABC News (Australia): National Film and Sound Archive announces 2021 Sounds of Australia inductees

ABC News (Australia): National Film and Sound Archive announces 2021 Sounds of Australia inductees. “‘For the pain, suffering and hurt of these Stolen Generations, their descendants and for their families left behind, we say sorry.’ These words from Kevin Rudd’s Apology to Australia’s Indigenous Peoples were heard across the country when they were first uttered in 2008, as part of a formal apology on behalf of the Australian Parliament to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. Now, they have been added to the National Film and Sound Archive’s (NFSA) Sounds of Australia for 2021.”

Government of Australia: Preserving Australia’s at-risk collections with $47 million

Government of Australia: Preserving Australia’s at-risk collections with $47 million. “The Morrison Government is investing more than $47 million to digitise and preserve collection material held by the National Film and Sound Archive (NFSA), and seven other National Collecting Institutions, and to maintain the National Library of Australia’s (NLA) Trove website. The NFSA will receive $41.9 million over four years to fund a major program to digitise and store at-risk audio-visual collection material held across the eight National Collecting Institutions.”

Sydney Morning Herald: Kilometres of official secrets, collecting dust and costing taxpayers

Sydney Morning Herald: Kilometres of official secrets, collecting dust and costing taxpayers. “Australia’s intelligence community has conceded it is breaching laws governing how some of the nation’s most important historical documents are stored, revealing more than 10 kilometres of classified documents are gathering dust and may never be made public. Documents released to The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age under freedom of information laws show the Foreign Affairs Department, Defence, ASIO and other intelligence agencies all believe more money has to be sunk into preserving historical records and changes made to the nation’s archives laws.”

RiotAct: National Film and Sound Archive preserving lockdown’s creative collection

RiotAct: National Film and Sound Archive preserving lockdown’s creative collection. “Among some of the quirky bits and pieces preserved for posterity in the NFSA’s ‘Creativity in the Time of COVID’ project – which has been running throughout Australia’s arduous lockdowns – you’ll find the YouTube hit, Nat’s What I Reckon, which takes cooking shows in a bizarre direction thanks to rocker host Nat. You can also find internet hit Love in Lockdown, an unlikely romantic comedy created by TV comedians Robyn Butler and Wayne Hope.” Nat’s What I Reckon sounded fun so I took a look. It’s like YOU SUCK AT COOKING goes to Hell via Australia. I subscribed immediately.

EurekAlert: New archaeological discoveries highlight lack of protections for submerged Indigenous sites

EurekAlert: New archaeological discoveries highlight lack of protections for submerged Indigenous sites. “New archaeological research highlights major blind spots in Australia’s environmental management policies, placing submerged Indigenous heritage at risk. The Deep History of Sea Country (DHSC) project team have uncovered a new intertidal stone quarry and stone tool manufacturing site, as well as coastal rock art and engravings, during a land-and-sea archaeological survey off the Pilbara coastline in Western Australia.”

Noise 11: The Production Company Documents Its Australian Theatre History Online

Noise 11: The Production Company Documents Its Australian Theatre History Online. “Now The Production Company website documents it all from the very first show ‘Mame’ in 1999 through to the final season in 2019 with included David Bowie’s final project with the Australian premiere of ‘Lazarus’ (and to date the only Australian production of ‘Lazarus’). It was an incredible output.”

Treasure quest: Researchers embark on a pre-modern manuscript mission (Monash University Lens)

Monash University Lens: Treasure quest: Researchers embark on a pre-modern manuscript mission. “Thousands of stories have been written about the impact of COVID-19. One overlooked group is historians in Australia whose research efforts have been stymied by travel restrictions. Medieval scholar Guy Geltner’s solution is to search for any ‘pre-modern’ manuscripts that may be lurking in private collections in Victoria.”

Monash University: New ARC-funded research project set to put death in its place

Monash University: New ARC-funded research project set to put death in its place. “The project, Putting Death In Its Place, in collaboration with Libraries Tasmania, will link individuals and their families to the locations where they were born, lived and died, using over 890,000 Tasmania population records from 1838 to 1930. Using innovative matching techniques and Tasmania’s wealth of digital archives, the project is the first of its kind in Australia to link a data set of this size to a reconstructed historic landscape. It aims to assess the influence that the quality and location of housing and public infrastructure had on life expectancy and other health and social outcomes.”

Phys .org: Importance of saving Indigenous languages

Phys .org: Importance of saving Indigenous languages. “Connection to country, culture and community is intrinsically linked to teaching and retaining Indigenous languages, a Flinders University communications expert says. Flinders University Emeritus Professor Andrew Butcher, who has been researching Aboriginal languages of Australia for more than 30 years, highlights the importance of preserving First Nations language, including pronunciation and other details in a recent paper in three Central Australian languages.”