Noise 11: The Production Company Documents Its Australian Theatre History Online

Noise 11: The Production Company Documents Its Australian Theatre History Online. “Now The Production Company website documents it all from the very first show ‘Mame’ in 1999 through to the final season in 2019 with included David Bowie’s final project with the Australian premiere of ‘Lazarus’ (and to date the only Australian production of ‘Lazarus’). It was an incredible output.”

Treasure quest: Researchers embark on a pre-modern manuscript mission (Monash University Lens)

Monash University Lens: Treasure quest: Researchers embark on a pre-modern manuscript mission. “Thousands of stories have been written about the impact of COVID-19. One overlooked group is historians in Australia whose research efforts have been stymied by travel restrictions. Medieval scholar Guy Geltner’s solution is to search for any ‘pre-modern’ manuscripts that may be lurking in private collections in Victoria.”

Monash University: New ARC-funded research project set to put death in its place

Monash University: New ARC-funded research project set to put death in its place. “The project, Putting Death In Its Place, in collaboration with Libraries Tasmania, will link individuals and their families to the locations where they were born, lived and died, using over 890,000 Tasmania population records from 1838 to 1930. Using innovative matching techniques and Tasmania’s wealth of digital archives, the project is the first of its kind in Australia to link a data set of this size to a reconstructed historic landscape. It aims to assess the influence that the quality and location of housing and public infrastructure had on life expectancy and other health and social outcomes.”

Sydney Morning Herald: Archives pleaded with Attorney-General to release report on its future

Sydney Morning Herald: Archives pleaded with Attorney-General to release report on its future. “The National Archives spent a year pleading with then-attorney-general Christian Porter to respond to a report into the institution, which revealed it needed a huge injection of cash to preserve some of the country’s most at-risk documents and help it abide by its own laws. Documents released to The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age under Freedom of Information show the Archives’ advisory council made repeated calls on Mr Porter to at least release the report that was handed to the attorney-general in early February last year.”

Phys .org: Importance of saving Indigenous languages

Phys .org: Importance of saving Indigenous languages. “Connection to country, culture and community is intrinsically linked to teaching and retaining Indigenous languages, a Flinders University communications expert says. Flinders University Emeritus Professor Andrew Butcher, who has been researching Aboriginal languages of Australia for more than 30 years, highlights the importance of preserving First Nations language, including pronunciation and other details in a recent paper in three Central Australian languages.”

Tasmania Examiner: Australian first historical website to illuminate Tasmania’s Indigenous history

Tasmania Examiner: Australian first historical website to illuminate Tasmania’s Indigenous history. “[The site] was believed to be the first site of its kind in Australia and tells the history of the Stoney Creek people who lived in the Tamar Valley for a thousand generations. The website was developed by historian and academic Dr Michael Powell and Indigenous historian Dr Aunty Patsy Cameron. More than 30 Indigenous and non-Indigenous academics, scholars and community members also contributed to the website.

Sydney Morning Herald: National Archives funding welcomed, but more needed

Sydney Morning Herald: National Archives funding welcomed, but more needed. “When one of Australia’s most experienced public servants, David Tune, conducted an extensive review of the National Archives’ funding requirements he stressed that a piecemeal approach to saving the nation’s records would never be enough. Structural reform was essential. That is important to keep in mind, because while the federal government’s recently announced provision of $67.7 million to preserve the most at-risk items of Australia’s history is certainly welcome, much more is needed.”

Brisbane Times: National Archives gets $67.7m injection to save decaying documents

Brisbane Times: National Archives gets $67.7m injection to save decaying documents. “Almost 300,000 pieces of Australian history including radio recordings of former prime minister John Curtin and a petition to King George V for Indigenous representation in Federal Parliament will be saved after a $67.7 million funding injection into the National Archives. But the government is facing calls for extra money to protect even more documents, recordings and images as part of an overhaul of an archival system pushed to the brink of collapse by years of funding shortfalls.”

SBS Spanish: Challenge to declassify documents on Australia’s involvement in Pinochet coup continues in secret

SBS Spanish: Challenge to declassify documents on Australia’s involvement in Pinochet coup continues in secret. “Dr Clinton Fernandes is challenging the decision of the National Archives of Australia to withhold the publication of historical documents relating to Australian Secret Intelligence Service (ASIS) operations between 1971-1974 in Chile, plus records about Australia’s involvement in the overthrow of President Salvador Allende. But Australian intelligence representatives say that disclosure of information may be damaging and should be kept secret.”

Brisbane Times (Australia): Donations pour in to Archives as historians decry decay of ‘national memory bank’

Brisbane Times (Australia): Donations pour in to Archives as historians decry decay of ‘national memory bank’. “The National Archives has raised almost $100,000 in donations in a bid to save its most at-risk records as some of the nation’s pre-eminent historians argue it should never have been forced into a public appeal for funding. In the four weeks since the Archives launched a membership program, which asks $40 a person or $60 a household, the number of people backing it has swelled seven-fold to more than 700.”

Australian National University: A ‘treasure’ map of Indigenous history in Australia

Australian National University: A ‘treasure’ map of Indigenous history in Australia . “A new project at The Australian National University (ANU) shifts from the Australian history told from our colonial beginnings to one told by Aboriginal people, with stories that connect their recent past to the ancient history of their traditional lands. Under the direction of the ANU Research Centre for Deep History, Professor Ann McGrath and mapping consultant Kim Mahood worked with Aboriginal Elders associated with the Lake Mungo region to record their family stories.”