ABC News (Australia): Pandora shipwreck history to be shared through digital project in Queensland

ABC News (Australia): Pandora shipwreck history to be shared through digital project in Queensland. “Thousands of underwater films, photographs, hand-drawn maps, field journals and other unseen archive material are being digitised to bring to light the untold story of the discovery and excavation of the Pandora wreck 120 kilometres east of Cape York.”

News Australia: Older Aussies are exposed by shift to online banking

News Australia: Older Aussies are exposed by shift to online banking. “Data shows phishing attacks on senior Australians are on the rise in a big way, with the ACCC’s Scamwatch reporting Australians over 65 have lost more money to phishing scams this year than all other age groups combined – totalling over $6.5 million in the first eight months of the year. And that could just be the tip of the iceberg.”

ABC News (Australia): Canberra galleries, museums call for urgent budget aid to undo decade of ‘utter neglect’

ABC News (Australia): Canberra galleries, museums call for urgent budget aid to undo decade of ‘utter neglect’. “Canberra’s top museums and galleries say they cannot afford to fix their ageing buildings and are pleading for financial aid in next month’s federal budget. A lobby group representing the cultural institutions said about $800 million was needed to repair the facilities, which include places like the National Gallery of Australia (NGA) and the National Library of Australia (NLA).”

Australian Arts Review: Tarnanthi Art Fair goes online in 2022 with thousands of works from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander artists

Australian Arts Review: Tarnanthi Art Fair goes online in 2022 with thousands of works from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander artists. “The Art Gallery of South Australia’s popular Tarnanthi Art Fair will return as an online event from Friday 14 to Monday 17 October 2022. Bigger than ever before, the 2022 Tarnanthi Art Fair will also offer a series of public programs including creative workshops both online and in person, language tutorials in Kaurna, Pitjantjatjara and Yankunytjatjara, and an online discussion about buying art ethically.”

NiemanLab: Canada’s Online News Act shows how other countries are learning from Australia’s news bill

NiemanLab: Canada’s Online News Act shows how other countries are learning from Australia’s news bill. “Why does Google care what Canada does? The answer likely lies in how this bill evolves and builds on the model implemented in Australia, and the fact that other countries around the world are watching this evolution and developing their own similar laws. The Canadian code probably won’t have a material financial impact on these platforms, but countries learning from each other, improving on the model, and it spreading globally very could. So what does the Online News Act do, what does it get right and wrong, and should it be passed, scrapped or improved?”

Australian Associated Press: High Court rules Google not a publisher

Australian Associated Press: High Court rules Google not a publisher. “Australia’s highest court has ruled Google is not legally responsible for defamatory news articles as it is not the publisher of such content. A majority of High Court justices on Wednesday found Google was not the publisher of a defamatory article by The Age about a Victorian lawyer, as it was a search engine that only provided hyperlinks to news stories.”

Drive: Google Maps blamed for family left stranded in outback

Drive: Google Maps blamed for family left stranded in outback. “A family rescued from outback New South Wales has blamed Google Maps for sending their Hyundai Tucson down an inaccessible track, according to 9News. Despite a single asphalt road connecting the remote towns of Tibooburra and Packsaddle in the north west of NSW, it’s understood the Hyundai Tucson was located about 50km southeast of Tibooburra.”

Poynter: Australia’s news media bargaining code pries $140 million from Google and Facebook

Poynter: Australia’s news media bargaining code pries $140 million from Google and Facebook. “More than a year after Australian political parties across the spectrum united around a law that pushed Google and Facebook to pay for the news they distribute, a further 24 smaller media outlets will now receive money from Google. This means that Google has made deals with essentially all qualifying media companies. These deals, and those struck with Facebook, have injected well over $200 million AUD into Australian journalism each year according to Rod Sims, the former chair of the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission who initiated the Code.”

NSW Government (Australia): National defamation reform for search engines and social media opens for comment

NSW Government (Australia): National defamation reform for search engines and social media opens for comment. “Australians are invited to have their say on new proposals released today to modernise national defamation law for search engines and social media sites. NSW Attorney General Mark Speakman said the reforms, led by NSW, focus on the extent to which internet intermediaries should be liable for reputation-damaging material published by third party users online.”

Six News Australia: Why we’ve created a new Twitter account to monitor MPs on TikTok

Six News Australia: Why we’ve created a new Twitter account to monitor MPs on TikTok. “We hear about it almost every day – misinformation spreading on social media, and on platforms like TikTok. But while some think of it as a ‘dancing app,’ TikTok is being used by MPs and parties a lot these days. Labor, the Liberals, The Greens, One Nation & the Victorian Socialists are just some of the parties with active TikTok accounts.”

Tech Xplore: Aboriginal language could help solve complex AI problems

Tech Xplore: Aboriginal language could help solve complex AI problems. “An Aboriginal language could hold the key to solving some of the most challenging communication problems between humans and artificial intelligence (AI) systems. A new paper, published by Frontiers in Physics and led by UNSW Canberra’s Professor Hussein Abbass, explains how Jingulu—a language spoken by the Jingili people in the Northern Territory—has characteristics that allow it to be easily translated into AI commands.”