Mashable: Facebook briefly blocked breaking news stories about its security breach — and that’s a problem

Mashable: Facebook briefly blocked breaking news stories about its security breach — and that’s a problem. “Word of the Facebook hack was quickly covered by several major news outlets and spread throughout social media. Naturally, Facebook users wanted to share the story to warn their friends of the exploit. But for a brief period Friday afternoon, many users found that they could not share stories from several legitimate news outlets. Facebook was reportedly blocking people from posting stories about the hack published by The Guardian, Sacramento Bee, and Associated Press.”

TorrentFreak: Google, Yandex Discuss Creation of Anti-Piracy Database

TorrentFreak: Google, Yandex Discuss Creation of Anti-Piracy Database. “Google, Yandex and other prominent Internet companies in Russia are discussing the creation of a database of infringing content including movies, TV shows, games, and software. The idea is that the companies will automatically query this database every five minutes with a view to removing such content from search results within six hours, no court order required.”

Ars Technica: Sorry, Sony Music, you don’t own the rights to Bach’s music on Facebook

Ars Technica: Sorry, Sony Music, you don’t own the rights to Bach’s music on Facebook. “Sony Music Entertainment has been forced to abandon its claim that it owned 47 seconds of video of musician James Rhodes using his own piano to play music written by Johann Sebastian Bach.”

Motherboard: This Music Theory Professor Just Showed How Stupid and Broken Copyright Filters Are

Motherboard: This Music Theory Professor Just Showed How Stupid and Broken Copyright Filters Are. “German music professor Ulrich Kaiser this week wrote about a troubling experiment he ran on YouTube. As a music theory teacher, Kaiser routinely works to catalog a collection of public domain recordings he maintains online in order to teach his students about Beethoven and other classical music composers. The first video Kaiser posted online simply explained his efforts to provide digitized copies of public domain recordings to students, with some of the music in question playing in the background. But within three minutes of being posted online, YouTube’s Content ID system had flagged the music for a copyright violation—despite no copyright actually being violated.”

Julia Reda: Out-of-control censorship machines removed my article warning of out-of-control censorship machines

Julia Reda: Out-of-control censorship machines removed my article warning of out-of-control censorship machines . “A few days ago, about a dozen articles and campaign sites criticising EU plans for copyright censorship machines silently vanished from the world’s most popular search engine. Proving their point in the most blatant possible way, the sites were removed by exactly what they were warning of: Copyright censorship machines. Among the websites that were made impossible to find: A blog post of mine in which I inform Europeans about where their governments stand on online censorship in the name of copyright and a campaign site warning of copyright law that favors corporations over free speech.”

Techdirt: Automated ‘Content Protection’ System Sends Wave Of Bogus DMCA Notice Targeting Legitimate URLs

Techdirt: Automated ‘Content Protection’ System Sends Wave Of Bogus DMCA Notice Targeting Legitimate URLs. “Yet another content protection service decides it’s better off letting the machines do the work, with predictably catastrophic results. The EFF first noticed the DMCA abuse being committed by ‘Topple Track,’ a content protection service offered by Symphonic Distribution. Symphonic talks big about its protection service, pointing out its position as one of the ‘leading members’ of Google’s ‘Trusted Copyright Program.'”

Tubefilter: YouTube Guitarist Claims He Got A Copyright Strike For Infringing Upon His Own Song

Tubefilter: YouTube Guitarist Claims He Got A Copyright Strike For Infringing Upon His Own Song. “Dutch guitarist Paul Davids has been on YouTube for roughly four years, but late last month he experienced an interesting conundrum: Davids received a notification from the platform that one of his videos had committed copyright infringement — though he claims it turned out to be his own video that he had infringed upon.”