Hong Kong Polytechnic University: PolyU researchers compile world’s first “atlas” of airborne microbes that an important new perspective for public health researchprovides

Hong Kong Polytechnic University: PolyU researchers compile world’s first “atlas” of airborne microbes that provides an important new perspective for public health research. “Bacteria are truly abundant across the Earth’s surface, from the soil to the oceans. The microbial population of the air that surrounds us is comparatively unknown, but a research expedition led by PolyU scientists is about to change that. After nearly a decade of effort, they have compiled a comprehensive map of the world’s airborne microbes, providing fresh insights into how these species interact with the surface environment – as well as their likely future changes.”

EurekAlert: Researchers build a ‘Wikipedia’ for resistant bacteria

EurekAlert: Researchers build a ‘Wikipedia’ for resistant bacteria. “In the future, even a small infection can become life-threatening for people if disease-causing bacteria become resistant to traditional treatment with antibiotics. Based on 214,000 microbiome samples, DTU researchers have created a freely accessible platform that shows where in the world different types of resistant bacteria are found and in what quantities.”

EMBL: Connecting the dots between bacterial genes around the world

EMBL: Connecting the dots between bacterial genes around the world. “This database, created using publicly available data, contains more than 2 billion genes, 303 million of them dubbed unigenes. A unigene is a DNA sequence that scientists use during data analysis to represent a group of multiple almost-identical gene sequences that come from the same microbial species. These unigenes have been identified from 14 different environments, including human and animal bodies, as well as soil and water from different geographical locations. The resource aims to help the scientific community study various aspects of microbial planetary biology, such as similarities and differences between microbiomes found in distant locations or facing different environmental conditions.”

Phys .org: New database of 660,000 assembled bacterial genomes sheds light on the evolution of bacteria

Phys .org: New database of 660,000 assembled bacterial genomes sheds light on the evolution of bacteria. “In a new study, from the Wellcome Sanger Institute and EMBL’s European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI), researchers standardized all bacterial genome data held in the European Nucleotide Archive (ENA) before 2019, creating a searchable and accessible database of genomic assemblies. In the research, published on 9 November 2021 in PLOS Biology, researchers reviewed all of the bacterial data available as of November 2018 and assembled it into over 660,000 genomes.”

MIT News: A comprehensive catalogue of human digestive tract bacteria

MIT News: A comprehensive catalogue of human digestive tract bacteria. “The human digestive tract is home to thousands of different strains of bacteria. Many of these are beneficial, while others contribute to health problems such as inflammatory bowel disease. Researchers from MIT and the Broad Institute have now isolated and preserved samples of nearly 8,000 of these strains, while also clarifying their genetic and metabolic context.”