Making Meaningful Impact: Using Data Science for Social Good (Carnegie Mellon University)

Carnegie Mellon University: Making Meaningful Impact: Using Data Science for Social Good. “… the Baltimore City Department of Housing and Community Development (DHCD) is tasked with assessing 15,000 vacant homes to identify and remediate roof damage. The problem is complex, systemic and formidable. Enter the Data Science for Social Good (DSSG) Summer Fellowship at Carnegie Mellon University.”

Artnet News: Artist Derrick Adams Wins $1.25 Million From the Mellon Foundation to Start a Database Documenting the Black Culture of Baltimore

Artnet News: Artist Derrick Adams Wins $1.25 Million From the Mellon Foundation to Start a Database Documenting the Black Culture of Baltimore. “This week, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation announced that it will award $1.25 million to the Black Baltimore Digital Database, a new archive cataloguing important cultural contributions by Black Baltimoreans.”

Baltimore Sun: UMBC students archive Highlandtown’s Latino immigration history and food culture

Baltimore Sun: UMBC students archive Highlandtown’s Latino immigration history and food culture. “Thirteen students from University of Maryland, Baltimore County, are working to fill a gap in history with the Highlandtown Immigration and Food Project. Through archival research and panel discussions with nonprofit groups’ leaders and business owners, the students created a timeline of Latino politics, history and food culture in Southeast Baltimore neighborhood from the 1980s to the 1990s.”

“Worthy of monumentalization”: Black Arts District preserves cultural memory of Pennsylvania Avenue (Baltimore Fishbowl)

Baltimore Fishbowl: “Worthy of monumentalization”: Black Arts District preserves cultural memory of Pennsylvania Avenue. “Immortalized in bronze, Billie Holiday sings in the Upton neighborhood, her hair adorned with gardenias. Across the striking statue once stood the Royal Theatre, the famed West Baltimore venue where Holiday and fellow Black jazz and blues stars once performed. The eight-and-a-half-foot statue is the sole monument of how Pennsylvania Avenue was an epicenter for Black art and entertainment businesses during the early to mid-20th century.”

Baltimore Sun: More than 10% of Baltimore City Schools workers who refused to get vaccinated by deadline now face termination

Baltimore Sun: More than 10% of Baltimore City Schools workers who refused to get vaccinated by deadline now face termination. “As a Monday deadline passed for Baltimore City Public Schools employees to get vaccinated against COVID-19, more than 10% of its workforce has yet to comply. Baltimore city schools, the region’s first school system to institute a vaccination mandate, will begin enforcing the mandate, including terminating employees who don’t get the inoculations or request and receive an exemption by early December, according to Andre Riley, a spokesman for the system.”

Baltimore pushes to reach people in neighborhoods with lowest vaccination rates (WBAL)

WBAL: Baltimore pushes to reach people in neighborhoods with lowest vaccination rates. “There’s a new push in Baltimore to get more people vaccinated against COVID-19, particularly in some of the city’s neighborhoods that have the lowest vaccination rates. City leaders on Friday unveiled an updated COVID-19 dashboard as a new tool to track the spread of the virus and vaccination coverage.”

Baltimore Brew: At West Baltimore site, more than 2,200 Covid vaccine doses are administered in a single day

Baltimore Brew: At West Baltimore site, more than 2,200 Covid vaccine doses are administered in a single day. “Enter Sarah Matthews and her Vaccine Empowerment Team, a group of individuals, mostly seniors themselves, who decided to take matters into their own hands and get shots to the people who despaired of ever getting them. The team clearly succeeded. In an event that came together in just three days after Matthews learned that Walgreens would provide the vaccine, more than 2,200 were inoculated.”

Johns Hopkins University: Mellon Foundation awards $4 million grant to Inheritance Baltimore project

Johns Hopkins University: Mellon Foundation awards $4 million grant to Inheritance Baltimore project. “The project, Inheritance Baltimore: Humanities and Arts Education for Black Liberation, will pioneer methods of instruction, research, preservation, and doctoral education that works with Black institutions to bring the experiences of Baltimore’s Black community to the fore and combat institutional racism. The project will also document and preserve the ways Black people attained knowledge within and outside of academic disciplines.”

Smithsonian Magazine: A Native American Community in Baltimore Reclaims Its History

Smithsonian Magazine: A Native American Community in Baltimore Reclaims Its History. “Baltimore may be famous for John Waters, Edgar Allan Poe, and steamed crabs, but very few people are aware that there was once a sizeable population of American Indians, the Lumbee tribe, who lived in the neighborhoods of Upper Fells Point and Washington Hill. By the 1960s, there were so many Native Americans living in the area that many Lumbee affectionately referred to it as ‘The Reservation.’ In the early 1970s, this part of Baltimore underwent a massive urban renewal development project and many Lumbee residences were destroyed, including most of the 1700 block of East Baltimore Street.”

WBAL: Grandsons use social media to ID people, places in historic Baltimore photos

WBAL: Grandsons use social media to ID people, places in historic Baltimore photos. “I. Henry Phillips’ work inspired his son and grandson to become photographers. Now, they’re hoping to share that legacy with a new generation. When I. Henry Phillips died, he left as many as 50,000 photo negatives to his family. Years ago, his grandson, H. Webster Phillips, started scanning them and converting them to digital files…. H. Webster Phillips has about 10,000 of his grandfather’s images digitized, but he needs help to identify the people and places in them. So, the I. Henry Photo Project was born.”

The Baltimore Sun: Baltimore email archive still not accessible after cyber attack. What does that mean for records requests?

The Baltimore Sun: Baltimore email archive still not accessible after cyber attack. What does that mean for records requests?. “An archive of Baltimore employees’ emails still can’t be accessed after the city’s computer network was attacked by hackers in May, a city official said Friday. City Solicitor Andre Davis said emails older than 90 days cannot be retrieved. He said he expects the information will be recovered, but was not certain.”

Baltimore’s bill for ransomware: Over $18 million, so far (Ars Technica)

Ars Technica: Baltimore’s bill for ransomware: Over $18 million, so far. “It has been a month since the City of Baltimore’s networks were brought to a standstill by ransomware. On Tuesday, Mayor Bernard ‘Jack’ Young and his cabinet briefed press on the status of the cleanup, which the city’s director of finance has estimated will cost Baltimore $10 million—not including $8 million lost because of deferred or lost revenue while the city was unable to process payments. The recovery remains in its early stages, with less than a third of city employees issued new log-in credentials thus far and many city business functions restricted to paper-based workarounds.”

Baltimore Fishbowl: Open Justice Baltimore creates an openly searchable database of Baltimore’s cops

Baltimore Fishbowl: Open Justice Baltimore creates an openly searchable database of Baltimore’s cops. “Data scientist collective Open Justice Baltimore has assembled a new database with information on thousands of city police officers, comprised of data from public records and vetted, crowd-sourced information from the general public. The tool, dubbed BPD Watch, includes the names, badge numbers, salary history, unit assignment, photos (where available) and other details about more than 3,000 individuals employed by the Baltimore Police Department as of late October of 2018.”

The Baltimore Sun: Baltimore launches live map of sewage pollution — and temporarily stops alerting the public to contamination

The Baltimore Sun: Baltimore launches live map of sewage pollution — and temporarily stops alerting the public to contamination. “More than 14 million gallons of sewage-tainted water has washed into Baltimore streams over the past two months, but city officials haven’t alerted the public of the contamination. Federal and state environmental regulators require the city to notify the public anytime at least 10,000 gallons of sewage contamination enters waterways. But the Department of Public Works stopped issuing the alerts in late January, when it launched a live map of sewage overflows on its website.”

The Retriever: “Chicory” and the forgotten voices of Black Baltimore

The Retriever: “Chicory” and the forgotten voices of Black Baltimore. “In Nov. 1966, the first issue of ‘Chicory,’ written by everyday residents of Baltimore City, was published. Publishing original poetry with little to no editing, the magazine grew as a space for young people of color in the poorest neighborhoods of the city to express themselves. Working as a ‘vehicle for civic dialogue’ and fostering a community environment among the Black ghetto, ‘Chicory’ was for who [Mary] Rizzo described as ‘people who don’t necessarily like to write, but who have something to say.’”