Pacific Standard: Saving The Library Before It Burns

New-to-me, from Pacific Standard: Saving The Library Before It Burns. “In July of 1947, Surjan Singh Sood sensed a coming danger. The British government had announced a plan to divide colonial India into two separate states and Surjan, having already received threats on his own life, wanted to move his family to safety. He loaded his wife and children into a friend’s car and sent them away, across the Punjab province of British India, from Lahore to the city of Ludhiana. At the time, there was no border to cross between Pakistan and India, and the family made the trip with only one or two boxes, leaving most of their possessions at home. To Surjan’s middle son, Kulbhushan, it seemed inconceivable that they would not return. But a month later, Lahore became part of Pakistan. His father’s decision to move the family quickly to Ludhiana may have saved their lives.” This story is about a digital archive for the 1947 partition of India and Pakistan.

Quartz: Facebook trolls are using disinformation to sell T-shirts

Quartz: Facebook trolls are using disinformation to sell T-shirts. “In 2016, Russian trolls infamously used social media to stir up divisions in America’s social fabric in an effort to help Donald Trump become president. In 2018, trolls in Bangladesh are using the same tactics—to sell T-shirts.”

The Daily Star: HRW concerned over Bangladesh govt’s intensive surveillance on social media

The Daily Star: HRW concerned over Bangladesh govt’s intensive surveillance on social media. “Human Rights Watch today said Bangladesh government has embarked upon intensive and intrusive surveillance and monitoring of social media ahead of national elections, raising concern over a chilling effect on speech.”

Phys .org: Bangladesh shuts down mobile internet to tackle teen protests

Phys .org: Bangladesh shuts down mobile internet to tackle teen protests. “Bangladesh authorities have shut down mobile internet across swathes of the country, officials and local media said Sunday, as the authorities try to quell massive student protests that have spiralled into violence. For the last week students have brought parts of the capital Dhaka to a standstill with a protest against poor road safety after two teenagers were killed by a speeding bus.”

New Straits Times: Bangladesh plans to curb ‘digital opium’ of social media

New Straits Times: Bangladesh plans to curb ‘digital opium’ of social media. “Bangladesh wants to limit the amount of time its young people spend on social media, an official said Thursday, flagging plans to curb access to apps it considers ‘digital opium’. The telecoms regulator blamed excessive use of Facebook and other popular social media platforms for distracting tens of millions of students from their studies.”

Daily Sun (Bangladesh): Digital mapping of Liberation War

Daily Sun (Bangladesh): Digital mapping of Liberation War. “Internet-based news producer Priyo Limited has taken step to build ‘largest digital archive’ with digital mapping of the liberation war of Bangladesh. The developers aim to archive every minute incident, all in a single map, brick by brick of the glorious history of the country.” The site is in Bengali, but unfortunately Google Chrome didn’t offer to translate…

The Daily Star (Bangladesh): Apparel mapping project launched

The Daily Star (Bangladesh): Apparel mapping project launched. “A four-year project to create a publicly available, online map providing a detailed industry-wise database of all apparel factories in Bangladesh was launched by Brac University’s Centre for Entrepreneurship Development yesterday. ‘Digital RMG Factory Mapping in Bangladesh’ (DRFM-B) will collect credible, comprehensive and accurate data on factories across Bangladesh and disclose factory names, locations, number of workers, product type, export country, certifications and brand customers.”