The Next Web: Facebook and YouTube aren’t even trying to enforce the Alex Jones ban

The Next Web: Facebook and YouTube aren’t even trying to enforce the Alex Jones ban. “After Alex Jones was effectively banned from the internet — or at least his major distribution channels — last August, it appeared that we’d be rid of his half-baked conspiracy theories once and for all. Or, that’s what we thought, anyway…. It didn’t take long for Jones to feel the heat from the rest of the internet’s major players, including Apple, Facebook, Twitter, Spotify, and a handful of others. Each banned Jones, and InfoWars, permanently, from their respective platforms citing reasons ranging from simple terms of service violations, to actively inciting violence or promoting hate speech. But regardless of their actions against him, Jones is proving resilient, like a digital cockroach.”

Neowin: Facebook’s ban hammer hits marketing firm in the Philippines for inauthentic behavior

Neowin: Facebook’s ban hammer hits marketing firm in the Philippines for inauthentic behavior . “Over the past year, Facebook has swung its ban hammer against plenty of organizations across the world for violating its policies. These groups include fake news outlets in Bangladesh, Myanmar’s top military chief, and bogus pages in Brazil. Today, the social media company enforced the same action against a digital marketing company in the Philippines accused of orchestrating inauthentic activities and using fake accounts.”

CNN: We tested Tumblr’s ban on porn. It needs work

CNN: We tested Tumblr’s ban on porn. It needs work. “A picture of a woman breastfeeding a baby. A fully clothed woman taking selfies in the mirror. A photo of a vase. These images were all wrongly flagged by Tumblr as improper. Tumblr began its crackdown on adult content several weeks ago. But behind the scenes its technology still struggles to figure out the difference between what’s banned and approved nudity.”

CNET: Gab, the social network used by the Pittsburgh shooting suspect, returns online

CNET: Gab, the social network used by the Pittsburgh shooting suspect, returns online. “Gab, a fringe social network used by the Pittsburgh synagogue shooting suspect, resurfaced on Sunday. The site, which markets itself as a bastion of free speech amid censorship of extremists on Twitter and Facebook, was intermittently available late Sunday. Clicking on links to the site sometimes would produce error messages, but that didn’t seem to stop some of the site’s 800,000 users from posting celebratory messages, praising the company for coming back online.”

Engadget: EU will fine social media sites for lingering extremism

Engadget: EU will fine social media sites for lingering extremism. “The EU has been threatening to take action against online platforms that fail to remove extremist content within an hour for the most part of the year — and now we know what form its punishment will take. The likes of Google, Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube could be slapped with fines as high as 4 percent of annual turnover, revealed European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker.”

The Verge: Tumblr is explicitly banning hate speech, posts that celebrate school shootings, and revenge porn

The Verge: Tumblr is explicitly banning hate speech, posts that celebrate school shootings, and revenge porn. “Tumblr is changing its community guidelines to more explicitly ban hate speech, glorifying violence, and revenge porn. The new rules go into effect on September 10th.”