New to TikTok: Trump’s looming ban prompts some to download the app (CNET)

CNET: New to TikTok: Trump’s looming ban prompts some to download the app. “Luna Flesher had considered downloading TikTok but worried about the security of the short-form video app. Plus, the 46-year-old thought the app, famous for dance-offs and lip syncing, was for teens. On Friday, Flesher pushed those concerns aside and started using TikTok for the first time after news broke that the Trump administration planned to bar new downloads of the app on midnight Sunday.”

“Video Unavailable”: Social Media Platforms Remove Evidence of War Crimes (Human Rights Watch)

Human Rights Watch: “Video Unavailable”: Social Media Platforms Remove Evidence of War Crimes. “In recent years, social media platforms have been taking down online content more often and more quickly, often in response to the demands of governments, but in a way that prevents the use of that content to investigate people suspected of involvement in serious crimes, including war crimes. While it is understandable that these platforms remove content that incites or promotes violence, they are not currently archiving this material in a manner that is accessible for investigators and researchers to help hold perpetrators to account.”

Mashable: Facebook’s new policies are meant to stop the spread of conspiracy theories and hate in Groups

Mashable: Facebook’s new policies are meant to stop the spread of conspiracy theories and hate in Groups. “For the first time, Facebook is releasing stats concerning how the social media platform moderates what goes on in Facebook Groups. Alongside the new numbers, the company has also announced new policies surrounding how it will deal with conspiracy theories and hate speech that often flourishes inside these groups.”

ZDNet: Google ‘formally’ bans stalkerware apps from the Play Store

ZDNet: Google ‘formally’ bans stalkerware apps from the Play Store. “Google has updated its Play Store rules to impose a ‘formal’ ban on stalkerware apps, but the company has left a pretty huge loophole in place for stalkerware to be uploaded on the official store as child-tracking applications.”

Trump’s war on TikTok could hurt these teachers: ‘My family will be screwed’ (Los Angeles Times)

Los Angeles Times: Trump’s war on TikTok could hurt these teachers: ‘My family will be screwed’. “An executive order targeting the popular video-sharing app TikTok made doing business with its Chinese parent company, Bytedance, illegal starting on Sept. 20. The order sparked a flurry of speculation: on the legality of the action, on the legitimacy of its claims that TikTok posed a national security threat, and over which U.S. company might try to buy the app and save its tens of millions of users from oblivion. For teachers on GoGoKid, which is also owned by Bytedance, it raised more urgent questions.”

Mashble: Facebook removes misinformation related to Oregon wildfires

Mashable: Facebook removes misinformation related to Oregon wildfires. “Another day, another slew of misinformation being shared on Facebook. But this time, the social media platform is removing several false claims before they spread to an even wider audience. On Saturday, Facebook’s policy communications manager, Andy Stone, tweeted that the platform is removing misinformation related to the wildfires in Oregon, which have killed at least 10 people.”

NPR: Twitter’s New Rules Aim To Prevent Confusion Around The 2020 Vote

NPR: Twitter’s New Rules Aim To Prevent Confusion Around The 2020 Vote. “Twitter is putting new restrictions on election-related content, including labeling or removing posts that claim victory before results are official or attempt to disrupt the peaceful transfer of power.”

Sky News Australia: ‘New online safety act’ to curb graphic content on social media platforms

Sky News Australia: ‘New online safety act’ to curb graphic content on social media platforms. “Communications Minister Paul Fletcher has spruiked the Morrison government’s ‘basic online safety expectations’ legislation after a graphic suicide clip was viewed and resent multiple times on Facebook and TikTok before being removed.”

TechCrunch: Facebook boots Patriot Prayer, a far-right group with a history of violence

TechCrunch: Facebook boots Patriot Prayer, a far-right group with a history of violence. “Facebook removed accounts belonging to far-right group Patriot Prayer and its leader Joey Gibson on Friday, citing a new effort to eradicate ‘violent social militias’ from the platform. That effort emerged through a policy update in mid-August to the company’s rules around “Dangerous Individuals and Organizations.” Those changes resulted in the removal of a number of groups and pages linked to the pro-Trump conspiracy theory known as QAnon and some militia organizations, as well as groups and pages linked to Antifa, a decentralized left-leaning ideology that opposes fascism.”

BBC: TikTok tries to remove widely shared suicide clip

BBC: TikTok tries to remove widely shared suicide clip. “Video-sharing site TikTok is struggling to take down clips showing a man killing himself. The footage, which has been circulating on the platform for several days, originated on Facebook and has also been shared on Twitter and Instagram. TikTok is hugely popular with young people – and many have reported coming across the video and being traumatised by the content.”

Alain Cocq: Facebook blocks incurably ill man from livestreaming death (BBC)

BBC: BBC: Alain Cocq: Facebook blocks incurably ill man from livestreaming death. “Facebook says it will block a Frenchman suffering from an incurable condition from livestreaming his own death. Alain Cocq, 57, planned to broadcast his final days after starting to refuse food, drink and medicine on Saturday. President Emmanuel Macron had earlier denied his request for euthanasia.”
. “Facebook says it will block a Frenchman suffering from an incurable condition from livestreaming his own death. Alain Cocq, 57, planned to broadcast his final days after starting to refuse food, drink and medicine on Saturday. President Emmanuel Macron had earlier denied his request for euthanasia.”

Reuters: Internet giants could be fined up to $12 million under Austrian hate speech law

Reuters: Internet giants could be fined up to $12 million under Austrian hate speech law. “Austria plans to oblige large internet platforms like Facebook and Google to delete illegal content within days and impose fines of up to 10 million euros ($12 million) in case of non-compliance, the government said on Thursday.”

TASS: Google pays 1.5 mln rubles ($20,149) fine for poor filtering of banned content

TASS: Google pays 1.5 mln rubles ($20,149) fine for poor filtering of banned content. “In August, the Magistrates’ Court of the Tagansky District of Moscow ruled to impose a 1.5 million rubles on Google for a repeated violation related to insufficient search engine filtering of prohibited content.”

BBC: Facebook and Twitter ‘dismantle Russian network’

BBC: Facebook and Twitter ‘dismantle Russian network’. “Facebook says it has dismantled a small network of accounts and pages that were part of a Russian influence operation. The company said the campaign was linked to Russia’s Internet Research Agency (IRA), an organisation close to the Russian government and accused of interference in the 2016 US election. Twitter also suspended five accounts from the same network.”

Straits Times: Thai minister says clampdown on social media content won’t stop as Facebook plans to fight order

Straits Times: Thai minister says clampdown on social media content won’t stop as Facebook plans to fight order. “Thailand’s digital minister vowed not to relent on Wednesday (Aug 26) in a crackdown on social media content deemed illegal. It was also unlikely that Facebook would follow through on plans to challenge an order to block access to a group critical of the Thai monarchy, the minister said. The ‘Royalist Marketplace’ group, which had more than one million members, was blocked within Thailand late on Monday after the Digital Ministry threatened legal action against Facebook under the country’s Computer Crime Act.”