EPA: EPA Marks National Pollinator Week by Launching Pilot Projects and Resources Portal to Help Protect Vulnerable Species from Pesticides

EPA: EPA Marks National Pollinator Week by Launching Pilot Projects and Resources Portal to Help Protect Vulnerable Species from Pesticides. “To enhance access to pollinator protection resources, EPA launched a webpage that provides information on best pest management practices, state managed pollinator protection plans, and mitigations, from EPA, federal partners, and scientific journals that offer lessons on protecting pollinators and their habitat. These resources will help empower farmers and others interested in pollinator protection to learn about and address the challenges facing pollinators.”

Mississippi State University: MSU scientist building pollen database to improve bee nutrition asks citizens to assist

Mississippi State University: MSU scientist building pollen database to improve bee nutrition asks citizens to assist. “Priyadarshini Chakrabarti Basu, assistant professor in the Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, Entomology and Plant Pathology, is building a pollen database to catalogue the nutrition profiles of over 100 bee-pollinated plants. Her work, in partnership with colleagues at Oregon State University, is funded by a $500,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Agriculture and Food Research Initiative….She notes that while the team has collaborators collecting pollen throughout the U.S. and Canada, the researchers also are asking citizen scientists to assist with collection.”

Cornell Chronicle: eBird data can help track bee health

Cornell Chronicle: eBird data can help track bee health. “A two-year, $500,000 grant from the Walmart Foundation will allow a team of data scientists and ecologists to use eBird data to explore a new way to track pollinator health and biodiversity. The project allows the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the Cornell Atkinson Center for Sustainability to devise a new method of tracking the health of the all-important arthropod populations that are a part of pollinating one out of every three bites of food people eat – and it all starts with birds.”

New York Times: Offices Dangle Beehives and Garden Plots to Coax Workers Back

New York Times: Offices Dangle Beehives and Garden Plots to Coax Workers Back. “Office workers who were sent home during pandemic lockdowns often sought refuge in nature, tending to houseplants, setting up bird feeders and sitting outdoors with their laptops. Now, as companies try to coax skittish employees back to the office and building owners compete for tenants when vacancy rates are soaring, many have hit on the idea of making the office world feel more like the natural world.”

Newswise: Farmers help create ‘Virtual safe space’ to save bumblebees

Newswise: Farmers help create ‘Virtual safe space’ to save bumblebees. “BEE-STEWARD is a decision-support tool which provides a computer simulation of bumblebee colony survival in a given landscape. The tool lets researchers, farmers, policymakers and other interested parties test different land management techniques to find out which ones and where could be most beneficial for bees.”

Phys .org: A quarter of known bee species haven’t appeared in public records since the 1990s

Phys .org: A quarter of known bee species haven’t appeared in public records since the 1990s. “Researchers at the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET) in Argentina have found that, since the 1990s, up to 25% of reported bee species are no longer being reported in global records, despite a large increase in the number of records available. While this does not mean that these species are all extinct, it might indicate that these species have become rare enough that no one is observing them in nature.”

Salina Post: Web-based AI program encourages users to submit photos of bees for IDs

Salina Post: Web-based AI program encourages users to submit photos of bees for IDs. “A Kansas State University researcher’s effort to develop an artificial intelligence tool for identifying bees has created quite a buzz already. Brian Spiesman, an assistant professor in K-State’s Department of Entomology, launched the website…earlier this year to relieve a backlog of information needed to help track trends in bee populations across the world.”

Phys .org: How well do you know your bumblebees?

Phys .org: How well do you know your bumblebees?. “To mark Bees’ Needs Week, the X-Polli:Nation project launched the fun species identification tool which helps to distinguish bumblebee species in photos, in collaboration with Artificial Intelligence technologies. Users can use an interactive identification key, seek suggestions from automated image recognition and receive formative feedback through automatically generated texts. There are over 100 photos to practice on, organized in four difficulty levels.”

CNN: Honeybees hit by Trump budget cuts

CNN: Honeybees hit by Trump budget cuts. “The US Department of Agriculture has suspended data collection for its annual Honey Bee Colonies report, citing cost cuts — a move that robs researchers and the honeybee industry of a critical tool for understanding honeybee population declines, and comes as the USDA is curtailing other research programs.”

Purdue University: Online tool identifies best and safest places to keep bees

Purdue University: Online tool identifies best and safest places to keep bees. “Beekeepers must… identify safe places to establish their colonies. A new online tool, developed by entomologists from Penn State University in partnership with Purdue University, the University of Illinois, the University of Minnesota and Dickinson College, helps them do just that.” Currently the tool only provides information for Indiana, Illinois, and Pennsylvania, but more states will be added over time.

The Guardian: Can folk music save the honeybee?

The Guardian: Can folk music save the honeybee?. “Folk music has long gone hand in hand with political protest. From Pete Seeger’s 1959 rendition of the African American gospel We Shall Overcome, which became an anthem for the civil rights movement, to Dick Gaughan’s Ballad of ‘84, a clarion call for the Scottish miners’ strike, the combination of one singer and their guitar has had a potent effect on galvanising activists. Now, folk is turning its attention to the bees.”

Economist: A new app listens to the problems of bees

Economist: A new app listens to the problems of bees. “YOU might expect to hear an angry buzzing when honeybees have been disturbed. But some apiarists reckon they can also deduce the condition of their bees from the sounds they make. A steady hum could be the sign of a contented hive; a change in tone might indicate that the bees are about to swarm. That intuition is about to be put to the test. Soon, beekeepers will be able to try to find out what is troubling a colony by listening to the buzz using a smartphone app.”