New York Times: Shanghai’s food crisis prompts residents in Beijing to stockpile supplies.

New York Times: Shanghai’s food crisis prompts residents in Beijing to stockpile supplies.. “Some Beijing residents have started stockpiling food in their homes in case the city imposes a lockdown, after seeing reports of food shortages and even street fights over food during a lockdown in Shanghai. Liu Chang, a 29-year-old Beijing resident who lives with his girlfriend, has stocked enough food to last three months. He is worried about possible shortages as well as price gouging in the coming months.”

SupChina: Beijing gives in to pressure from public to set up special quarantine site for pet owners

SupChina: Beijing gives in to pressure from public to set up special quarantine site for pet owners. “Last week, all 1.6 million residents of Daxing were banned from leaving the city, while people living in five Daxing neighborhoods where the cases were detected were ordered to remain indoors. Over the weekend, as new infections continued to soar, Daxing’s Tiangongyuan neighborhood ordered residents to move to centralized quarantine venues. Complaints quickly emerged on social media from people who had been told to leave their pets unattended at home.”

Washington Post: Beijing goes into ‘wartime mode’ as virus emerges at market

Washington Post: Beijing goes into ‘wartime mode’ as virus emerges at market. “A district in central Beijing has gone into ‘wartime mode’ after discovering a cluster of coronavirus cases around the biggest meat and vegetable market in the city, raising the prospect of a second wave of infections in the sensitive capital, the seat of the Chinese Communist Party. The discovery of dozens of infections, both symptomatic and asymptomatic, underscores the perniciousness of the virus and its propensity to spread despite tight social controls.”

The Bejinger: Time Travel Through Beijing’s Past With This Vast Photographic Archive

New-to-me, from The Bejinger: Time Travel Through Beijing’s Past With This Vast Photographic Archive. “First conceived in 2006, the Historical Photographs of China online archive is the fruit of a large-scale project that collects, researches, digitizes, and publishes historical photographs of China. The images largely come from private collections held outside of mainland China, from families with some historical link to the country, and many photographs having been handed down through the generations. There are thousands and thousands of images in the collection, with some of the earliest going back to the late 19th century, offering a fascinating glimpse into China’s past.”

China .org: Beijing launches website for old city protection

China .org: Beijing launches website for old city protection. “Beijing launched a new website on Dec. 17 to provide historical, cultural and geographical information of the old sites and relics in the capital. By visiting…, people can learn about Beijing at different times in history, appreciate the intangible cultural heritages, and access the memories of the city’s well-known people.” The site is in Chinese. On a scale of 1-10 for Google Translate-ability, with 10 being best, I’d rate it a 6. It got hung up on a couple menu pages and I had to just take a random guess.

New-to-Me: Beijing Silvermine

New-to-Me: Beijing Silvermine. “Beijing Silvermine is an archive of half a million negatives salvaged over the last seven years from a recycling plant on the edge of Beijing. Assembled by the French collector and artist Thomas Sauvin, Beijing Silvermine offers a unique photographic portrait of the Chinese capital and the life of its inhabitants in the decade following the Cultural Revolution.”

BMSTC Creates Serious Diseases Database

The Beijing Municipal Science & Technology Commission (BMSTC), a part of the government of Beijing, China, has created a serious diseases database. “Beijing has established a serious diseases database, which contains 164,000 cases and 1.63 million samples of diseases, according to the Beijing Municipal Science and Technology Commission Wednesday. Fourteen medical institutions participated in establishing the database.”