New York Times: These Reporters Rely on Public Data, Rather Than Secret Sources

New York Times: These Reporters Rely on Public Data, Rather Than Secret Sources. “The craft of building a story on publicly available data was part of journalism in the analog era, but it has come of age in recent years, with the ubiquity of smartphones and the expansion of social media.”

TechCrunch: Bellingcat journalists targeted by failed phishing attempt

TechCrunch: Bellingcat journalists targeted by failed phishing attempt. “News emerged that a small number of ProtonMail email accounts were targeted this week — several of which belonged to Bellingcat’s researchers who work on projects related to activities by the Russian government. A phishing email purportedly from ProtonMail itself asked users to change their email account passwords or generate new encryption keys through a similarly-named domain set up by the attackers. Records show the fake site was registered anonymously, according to an analysis by security researchers.”

Bellingcat’s Invitation Is Waiting For Your Response: An Investigative Guide To LinkedIn (Bellingcat)

Bellingcat: Bellingcat’s Invitation Is Waiting For Your Response: An Investigative Guide To LinkedIn. “Whether you’re investigating a company purporting to have damning information on Robert Mueller or conducting research on anti-Islamic State foreign fighters in Iraq and Syria, LinkedIn can serve as a useful resource for online researchers across a wide variety of subjects. This guide aims to provide helpful tools and techniques for identifying LinkedIn profiles and for extracting information that will then allow you to pivot to other social media profiles belonging to the target.”

The New Yorker: How to Conduct an Open-Source Investigation, According to the Founder of Bellingcat

The New Yorker: How to Conduct an Open-Source Investigation, According to the Founder of Bellingcat. “On a recent afternoon in central London, twelve people sat in a hotel conference room trying to figure out the exact latitude and longitude at which the actress Sharon Stone once posed for a photo in front of the Taj Mahal. Among them were two reporters, a human-rights lawyer, and researchers and analysts in the fields of international conflict, forensic science, online extremism, and computer security. They had each paid around twenty-four hundred dollars to join a five-day workshop led by Eliot Higgins, the founder of the open-source investigation Web site Bellingcat. Higgins had chosen this Sharon Stone photo because the photographer was standing on a raised terrace, which makes the angles confusing, and used a lens that makes Stone appear closer to the Taj than she actually was. The participants, working on laptops, compared the trees and paths visible in the photo to their correlates on Google Earth.”