The Guardian: Newcastle museum to return Benin bronze stave

The Guardian: Newcastle museum to return Benin bronze stave. “A Benin bronze in the collection of a Newcastle museum is to be proactively returned to Nigeria, the latest in a number of repatriations that ratchet up pressure on the British Museum to follow suit. Bosses of the Great North Museum: Hancock announced that it had recently been established that a brass stave with a distinctive bird finial had been looted from Benin City by the British military in 1897.”

Reuters: New online archive for Benin Bronzes to go live at end of 2022

Reuters: New online archive for Benin Bronzes to go live at end of 2022. “An online archive bringing together information on thousands of Benin Bronze artefacts in museums around the world is expected to go live at the end of next year, one of the organisers said on Friday. The Benin Bronzes, which are mostly in Europe, were stolen from Nigeria’s Benin City during colonialism and are among Africa’s most significant heritage objects.”

The Art Newspaper: Smithsonian Museum of African Art removes Benin bronzes from display and plans to repatriate them

The Art Newspaper: Smithsonian Museum of African Art removes Benin bronzes from display and plans to repatriate them . “The Smithsonian Institute’s National Museum of African Art in Washington, DC has removed its Benin bronzes from display and is planning to repatriate artefacts that were looted by the British in an 1897 raid on the royal palace, according to the museum’s director, Ngaire Blankenberg.”

EuroNews: British Museum accepts Nigerian artist’s gift – but keeps looted bronzes

EuroNews: British Museum accepts Nigerian artist’s gift – but keeps looted bronzes. “A Nigerian artist who gifted his own work to the British Museum with the hopes of receiving looted colonial art back from them has had his offer declined. The British Museum accepted a bronze plaque made by an artist Osarobo Zeickner-Okoro, from Benin City in Nigeria, who entered negotiations for the museum to return priceless Benin Bronzes that were looted by British troops in 1897. He offered his creation to encourage the museum to give back the sculptures but also to demand acknowledgement of Benin City’s modern-day culture.”

Washington Post: They were the world’s only all-female army. Their descendants are fighting to recapture their humanity.

Washington Post: They were the world’s only all-female army. Their descendants are fighting to recapture their humanity. . “History is often told through the lens of conquerors. Generations of American schoolchildren learned more about the 15th century ‘discoveries’ of Christopher Columbus than his record of enslaving Indigenous people. Britain framed its 1897 takeover of a storied West African kingdom as a ‘punitive mission,’ glossing over the mass theft of priceless bronzes. After France seized what is now southern Benin in 1894, colonial officers disbanded the territory’s unique force of women warriors, opened new classrooms and made no mention in the curriculum of the Amazons. Even today, many in the country of 12 million know little about their foremother.”

Museums Association: Trustees approve return of Benin bronzes held in Berlin museums

Museums Association: Trustees approve return of Benin bronzes held in Berlin museums. “Trustees of the Prussian Cultural Heritage Foundation, the federal government body that oversees the city’s state museums, authorised its director Hermann Panzinger to “negotiate the return of objects from the collections of the Staatliche Museen zu Berlin as part of the joint negotiations between the Federal Republic of Germany and the competent authorities in Nigeria.”

TSA Art Magazine: German Museum Organises a Digital Initiative for Looted Benin Bronzes and Artifacts

TSA Art Magazine: German Museum Organises a Digital Initiative for Looted Benin Bronzes and Artifacts. “>German art institution, Museum am Rothenbaum (MARKK) in Hamburg with the support of the Ernst von Siemens Kunststiftung, is setting up an international project that will digitally unite the globally dispersed works of art from the former Kingdom of Benin. Tagged Digital Benin, and involving German, Nigerian, European and American experts, the project aims to bring together object data and related documentation material from collections worldwide and provide the long-requested overview of the royal artworks looted in the 19th century.”

Quartz: Benin is the latest African nation taxing the internet

Quartz: Benin is the latest African nation taxing the internet. “Benin has joined a growing list of African states imposing levies for using the internet. The government passed a decree in late August taxing its citizens for accessing the internet and social-media apps. The directive, first proposed in July, institutes a fee (link in French) of 5 CFA francs ($0.008) per megabyte consumed through services like Facebook, WhatsApp, and Twitter. It also introduces a 5% fee, on top of taxes, on texting and calls, according to advocacy group Internet Sans Frontières (ISF).”