Phys .org: Researchers develop tool that analyzes biomedical data within minutes

Phys .org: Researchers develop tool that analyzes biomedical data within minutes. “Researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have developed a tool that speeds up the analysis and publication of biomedical data from many months or years to mere minutes, transforming the way researchers communicate results of their studies. Until now, the primary method available to share biomedical research data has been through print publication in scientific journals. The new tool, BioJupies, relies on cloud technologies to analyze and visualize large amounts of data, such as that acquired by genome sequencing, as described in the November 2018 issue of Cell Systems.”

University of Iowa Libraries: UI Libraries collaborates to expand access to research data

University of Iowa Libraries: UI Libraries collaborates to expand access to research data. “Students, faculty, and researchers across the Midwest and beyond will gain crucial access to large research datasets through a secure, cloud-based platform called CADRE (Collaborative Archive & Data Research Environment). CADRE will be developed through a large-scale partnership led by the Indiana University Libraries and the Indiana University Network Science Institute.”

Assessing the Methods, Tools, and Statistical Approaches in Google Trends Research: Systematic Review (JMIR)

JMIR: Assessing the Methods, Tools, and Statistical Approaches in Google Trends Research: Systematic Review. “In the era of information overload, are big data analytics the answer to access and better manage available knowledge? Over the last decade, the use of Web-based data in public health issues, that is, infodemiology, has been proven useful in assessing various aspects of human behavior. Google Trends is the most popular tool to gather such information, and it has been used in several topics up to this point, with health and medicine being the most focused subject. Web-based behavior is monitored and analyzed in order to examine actual human behavior so as to predict, better assess, and even prevent health-related issues that constantly arise in everyday life.”

Harvard Business Review: The Kinds of Data Scientist

Harvard Business Review: The Kinds of Data Scientist. “In 2012, HBR dubbed data scientist ‘the sexiest job of the 21st century’. It is also, arguably, the vaguest. To hire the right people for the right roles, it’s important to distinguish between different types of data scientist. There are plenty of different distinctions that one can draw, of course, and any attempt to group data scientists into different buckets is by necessity an oversimplification. Nonetheless, I find it helpful to distinguish between the deliverables they create. One type of data scientist creates output for humans to consume, in the form of product and strategy recommendations. They are decision scientists. The other creates output for machines to consume like models, training data, and algorithms. They are modeling scientists.”

Revealing Data: Investigating The Hospital’s File Sizes (Circulating Now)

Circulating Now: Revealing Data: Investigating The Hospital’s File Sizes. “For researchers interested in the administration of British hospitals in the late 19th and early 20th century, The Hospital is a vital resource. The Hospital, a journal published in London from 1886-1921, carried the tag line ‘the modern newspaper of administrative medicine and institutional life.’ It published an enormous variety of items of interest to physicians, nurses, hospital administrators, and public health professionals—everything from medical research to notes on fire prevention and institutional kitchen management, reflections on ‘the dignity of medicine,’ opinions about housing policy, and much more. While it is possible to study the journal’s contents by skimming through its archives or searching by keyword and author, researchers can also evaluate the whole corpus, or set, of the journal’s articles. “

Illinois State University: ISU geology professor awarded $1.7 million NSF grant

Illinois State University: ISU geology professor awarded $1.7 million NSF grant. “Illinois State Associate Professor of Geology Catherine O’Reilly is serving as principal investigator for a $1.7 million National Science Foundation grant to fund Project EDDIE, a series of classroom modules for undergraduate biology, geology, and environmental science students…. Project EDDIE (Environmental Data-Driven Inquiry and Exploration) is designed to help students and faculty work with large data sets. In addition, the project aims to improve students’ skills in quantitative reasoning, understanding of the nature of environmental science, and scientific discourse.”

PR Newswire: Google, Facebook, and Twitter Release Data on Political Ads (More or Less) (PRESS RELEASE)

PR Newswire: Google, Facebook, and Twitter Release Data on Political Ads (More or Less) (PRESS RELEASE). “Using cutting-edge machine learning and data scraping tools, computer scientists at the New York University Tandon School of Engineering today released the first database and analysis of political advertising based on more than 884,000 ads identified by Google, Twitter, and Facebook. The team launched their user-friendly Online Political Ads Transparency Project in July with data from Facebook, which was the first company to provide it. But the researchers were forced to switch techniques when Facebook blocked their data collection two weeks later. Today’s report is the first to include not only Facebook (including Instagram), but data newly shared by Twitter and Google.”