Wired: How Artificial Intelligence Is Changing Science

Wired: How Artificial Intelligence Is Changing Science. “No human, or team of humans, could possibly keep up with the avalanche of information produced by many of today’s physics and astronomy experiments. Some of them record terabytes of data every day — and the torrent is only increasing. The Square Kilometer Array, a radio telescope slated to switch on in the mid-2020s, will generate about as much data traffic each year as the entire internet.”

Bing Blogs: Microsoft Releases 12 million Canadian building footprints as Open Data

Bing Blogs: Microsoft Releases 12 million Canadian building footprints as Open Data. “Bing continues to invest and innovate in the space of computer vision and geospatial intelligence. Following our release of US buildings footprints last year, we’ve been looking for new markets to apply our techniques, and opportunities to continue our commitment to the open data community. As a result, the Bing Maps Team collaborated with Statistics Canada to deliver these 12 million building footprints, released as Open Data!”

Analytics India: 5 Popular Python Open-Source IDEs For Data Science Enthusiasts

Analytics India: 5 Popular Python Open-Source IDEs For Data Science Enthusiasts. “Integrated Development Environment (IDE) is the daily-used coding tool for a programmer which enables a complete set for Source Code Editor as well as debugging featured building tool. Over the last few years, Python has emerged as one of the most used languages by the programmers, thanks to its high versatility and developer community. In this article, we list down 5 top Python IDEs to choose from for data science enthusiasts.”

In the Library’s Web Archives: Sorting through a Set of US Government PDFs (Library of Congress)

Library of Congress: In the Library’s Web Archives: Sorting through a Set of US Government PDFs. “The Digital Content Management section has been working on a project to extract and make available sets of files from the Library’s significant web archives holdings. This is another step to explore the web archives and make them more widely accessible and usable. Our aim in creating these sets is to identify reusable, ‘real world’ content in the Library’s digital collections, which we can provide for public access. The outcome of the project will be a series of datasets, each containing 1,000 files of related media types selected from .gov domains. We will announce and explore these datasets here on The Signal, and the data will be made available through LC Labs. Although we invite usage and interest from a wide range of digital enthusiasts, we are particularly hoping to interest practitioners and scholars working on digital preservation education and digital scholarship projects.”

Google Blog: Doing our part to share open data responsibly

Google Blog: Doing our part to share open data responsibly. “This past weekend marked Open Data Day, an annual celebration of making data freely available to everyone. Communities around the world organized events, and we’re taking a moment here at Google to share our own perspective on the importance of open data. More accessible data can meaningfully help people and organizations, and we’re doing our part by opening datasets, providing access to APIs and aggregated product data, and developing tools to make data more accessible and useful.”

Science Magazine: Earth scientists plan to meld massive databases into a ‘geological Google’

Science Magazine: Earth scientists plan to meld massive databases into a ‘geological Google’. “The British Geological Survey (BGS) has amassed one of the world’s premier collections of geologic samples. Housed in three enormous warehouses in Nottingham, U.K., it contains about 3 million fossils gathered over more than 150 years at thousands of sites across the country. But this data trove ‘was not really very useful to anybody,’ says Michael Stephenson, a BGS paleontologist. Notes about the samples and their associated rocks ‘were sitting in boxes on bits of paper.’ Now, that could change, thanks to a nascent international effort to meld earth science databases into what Stephenson and other backers are describing as a ‘geological Google.'”