National Institutes of Health: NIH releases first dataset from unprecedented study of adolescent brain development

National Institutes of Health: NIH releases first dataset from unprecedented study of adolescent brain development. “The National Institutes of Health Tuesday released to the scientific community an unparalleled dataset from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) study. To date, more than 7,500 youth and their families have been recruited for the study, well over half the participant goal. Approximately 30 terabytes of data (about three times the size of the Library of Congress collection), obtained from the first 4,500 participants, will be available to scientists worldwide to conduct research on the many factors that influence brain, cognitive, social, and emotional development.”

Xinhua: China publishes world’s first big data journal on geoscience

Xinhua: China publishes world’s first big data journal on geoscience. “China has started publishing the world’s first big data journal on earth sciences, the Institute of Remote Sensing and Digital Earth under the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) said Tuesday. The journal, titled Big Earth Data, publishes research papers on big data related to the earth and encourages authors to store and share the data with the public.”

Phys .org: Powerful new dataset reveals patterns of global ozone pollution

Phys.org: Powerful new dataset reveals patterns of global ozone pollution. “Although ozone pollution is dropping across many parts of the United States, western Europe and Japan, many people living in those countries still experience more than a dozen days every year in which levels of the lung irritant exceed health-based standards. That’s one conclusion from a new health assessment based on the Tropospheric Ozone Assessment Report or TOAR, an effort by the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry Project to create the world’s most comprehensive database of surface ozone observations from all available ozone monitoring stations around the globe. The paper was published today in the journal Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene.”

Google Blog: Facilitating the discovery of public datasets

Google Blog: Facilitating the discovery of public datasets. “To provide better discovery and rich content for books, movies, events, recipes, reviews and a number of other content categories with Google Search, we rely on structured data that content providers embed in their sites using schema.org vocabulary. To facilitate similar capabilities for datasets, we have recently published new guidelines to help data providers describe their datasets in a structured way, enabling Google and others to link this structured metadata with information describing locations, scientific publications, or even Knowledge Graph, facilitating data discovery for others. We hope that this metadata will help us improve the discovery and reuse of public datasets on the Web for everybody.”

Harvard Business Review: How the Data That Internet Companies Collect Can Be Used for the Public Good

Harvard Business Review: How the Data That Internet Companies Collect Can Be Used for the Public Good. “We live in a quantified era. It is estimated that 90% of the world’s data was generated in the last two years — from which entirely new inferences can be extracted and applied to help address some of today’s most vexing problems. In particular, the vast streams of data generated through social media platforms, when analyzed responsibly, can offer insights into societal patterns and behaviors. These types of behaviors are hard to generate with existing social science methods. All this information poses its own problems, of complexity and noise, of risks to privacy and security, but it also represents tremendous potential for mobilizing new forms of intelligence.”

Phys.org: Dark Energy Survey publicly releases first three years of data

Phys.org: Dark Energy Survey publicly releases first three years of data. “At a special session held during the American Astronomical Society meeting in Washington, D.C., scientists on the Dark Energy Survey (DES) announced today the public release of their first three years of data. This first major release of data from the Survey includes information on about 400 million astronomical objects, including distant galaxies billions of light-years away as well as stars in our own galaxy.”

Smithsonian Magazine: Big Data Traces the World’s Most Distinctive Musical Traditions

Smithsonian Magazine: Big Data Traces the World’s Most Distinctive Musical Traditions. “From Tuvan throat singing to Chinese Opera, there are a lot of different types of music in the world. While musicologists have spent the last century or so collecting and preserving folk music traditions from around the globe, comparing such a vast number of sounds has been no easy task. But thanks to the help of cutting-edge computational analysis, a team of researchers have now sorted through thousands of recordings in an attempt to reveal which world music traditions are the most unique.”