Arch Daily: Data from 350,000 Smartphones Visualize the Urban Segregation in Chile

Arch Daily: Data from 350,000 Smartphones Visualize the Urban Segregation in Chile. “Every time you connect to the Internet or call someone, your smartphone plugs into the nearest available antenna, allowing X/CDR databases to anonymously access your personal record of checked-in places. The researchers worked with a 350,000-user database in Santiago, where each registered track allowed them to create a movement network. The sum of these movements indicates a community.”

ProPublica: How People Are Using Our Chicago Parking Ticket Data in Their Research

ProPublica: How People Are Using Our Chicago Parking Ticket Data in Their Research. “A few of them pointed me to aspects of the data that we had not addressed in our coverage. Kevin Lobo, a management consultant, explained how he analyzed the behavior of the Chicago police officers who wrote the most tickets. Wesley Skogan, a professor emeritus at Northwestern University’s Institute for Policy Research, mused about the placement of parking meters throughout the city. Lots of people showed me their charts. The work I saw was rigorous, creative and heartening for the practice of sharing journalistic resources with the public at no cost.”

Geo Awesomeness: CARTO boosts public geospatial data with Google BigQuery

Geo Awesomeness: CARTO boosts public geospatial data with Google BigQuery. “When location intelligence platform CARTO built its Data Observatory, the chief idea was to create an up-to-date index of location data. The recently released Data Observatory 2.0 takes that vision forward to provide Data Scientists with a scalable platform full of rich data in the format they really need it in! CARTO is now hosting geospatial datasets on Google Cloud’s BigQuery public datasets program.” You can learn more about CARTO via this article from TechCrunch.

Nature: A global wildfire dataset for the analysis of fire regimes and fire behaviour

Nature: A global wildfire dataset for the analysis of fire regimes and fire behaviour. “Here, we present and test a data mining work flow to create a global database of single fires that allows for the characterization of fire types and fire regimes worldwide. This work describes the data produced by a data mining process using MODIS burnt area product Collection 6 (MCD64A1). The entire product has been computed until the present and is available under the umbrella of the Global Wildfire Information System (GWIS).”

Bullet points: AI forging a path for better forensic medicine (Monash University)

Monash University: Bullet points: AI forging a path for better forensic medicine. “The Victorian Institute of Forensic Medicine (VIFM) – which also operates as Monash University’s Department of Forensic Medicine, performs autopsy services for all deaths reported to the Victorian State Coroner. It holds a globally unique data collection – more than 75,000 full-body computed tomography (CT) scans of dead people, an archive that increases by 7000 cases a year. All causes of death are represented, including traumatic injury, homicide and suicide. All age groups and genders are represented.”

NewScientist: Humans across cultures may share the same universal musical grammar

NewScientist: Humans across cultures may share the same universal musical grammar. “While music seems to be everywhere, scientists haven’t previously found much evidence to suggest it has any universal features. The prevailing view is that music is so diverse that few, if any, universals exist. Settling the matter empirically has been difficult, because research often focuses on individual cultures and musical contexts, says Samuel Mehr of Harvard University. So Mehr and his colleagues decided to use data science to try to understand what was universal and what varied in music across the world. To do this, they developed a database containing around 5000 detailed descriptions of songs and their performances in 60 human societies.”

The College of New Jersey: Civil engineering students and their professor apply big data to understand New Jersey’s bumper-to-bumper lifestyle.

The College of New Jersey: Civil engineering students and their professor apply big data to understand New Jersey’s bumper-to-bumper lifestyle.. “On a 100-degree day in late July, civil engineering professor Tom Brennan and three students in his research lab made it snow. No, indoor precipitation was not in the forecast: the snow storm was a computer simulation of an actual one that blew in pretty much out of nowhere on the afternoon of November 15, 2018, creating traffic nightmares throughout New Jersey.”