University of Arizona: $3M Grant to Create Cybersecurity Modeled After Human Body

University of Arizona: $3M Grant to Create Cybersecurity Modeled After Human Body. “A woman touches a hot stove, but thanks to the nervous system, she snatches her hand away before she gets too hurt. A virus enters the body, but the immune system fends off the invader before it can cause too much damage. What if our computers and smartphones could respond to security threats in the same proactive way our bodies respond to health threats?” This is not biometrics. I’m not sure how I’d describe it, but it’s not biometrics.

ScienceBlog: Machine Learning May Be Able To Predict If You’re In For A Healthy Old Age

ScienceBlog: Machine Learning May Be Able To Predict If You’re In For A Healthy Old Age. “For a study published December 19, 2018 in Genome Biology, a collaborative team at the Salk Institute analyzed skin cells ranging from the very young to the very old and looked for molecular signatures that can be predictive of age. Developing a better understanding of the biological processes of aging could eventually help to address health conditions that are more common in old age, such as heart disease and dementia.”

In Development: Google Spreadsheet of Information on Animal Flatulence

In development: Google Spreadsheet of information on animal flatulence. “Do baboons fart? What about salamanders? Millipedes? These questions sound like the sort Bart Simpson might have asked to derail science class. But real-life scientists are now taking to Twitter to provide answers. So far, they’ve created a hashtag — #DoesItFart — and a Google Spreadsheet that details the flatulence habits of more than 60 animals.” At the moment there are 79 animals listed, with the content ranging from scientific (links to journal articles) to ridiculous (one of the animals listed is a unicorn, the flatulence of which is described as “it’s glitter and rainbows soft serve.”)