USC Viterbi School of Engineering: Stopping Deepfake Voices

USC Viterbi School of Engineering: Stopping Deepfake Voices . “Not too long ago, the thought of an imposter running around with your voice sounded like something that could only happen to The Little Mermaid. But when a computer cloned the voice of late celebrity chef Anthony Bourdain in a 2021 released documentary film, and no one noticed, the world suddenly woke up to the reality of voice fakery. When it comes to voice-controlled devices, an attack can make ‘turn on the lights’ translate into ‘turn on the fire alarm.’ The same tactics, however, could be used to fake news stories and deceive voice recognition systems at banks.”

Judge: Clearview AI Cannot Use First Amendment as Defense in ACLU’s Privacy Suit (Law Street Media)

Law Street Media: Judge: Clearview AI Cannot Use First Amendment as Defense in ACLU’s Privacy Suit. “Late last week, an Illinois state court ruled in favor of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) and other advocacy rights groups in their fight against Clearview AI Inc. over its unauthorized collection of Illinois residents’ faceprints. According to the order, the court has jurisdiction over the matter and the Illinois Biometric Information Privacy Act (BIPA) claims will proceed, despite Clearview’s proffered free speech defense.”

The Register: Facebook used facial recognition without consent 200,000 times, says South Korea’s data watchdog

The Register: Facebook used facial recognition without consent 200,000 times, says South Korea’s data watchdog . “Facebook, Netflix and Google have all received reprimands or fines, and an order to make corrective action, from South Korea’s government data protection watchdog, the Personal Information Protection Commission (PIPC). The PIPC announced a privacy audit last year and has revealed that three companies – Facebook, Netflix and Google – were in violations of laws and had insufficient privacy protection.”

The Verge: Most US government agencies are using facial recognition

The Verge: Most US government agencies are using facial recognition. “A new report from the Government Accountability Office (GAO) found that 19 of the 24 US government agencies surveyed are using facial recognition in some way, illustrating how commonplace the controversial technology has become within the federal government. The list of agencies includes agencies like the Department of Defense and Department of Homeland Security (DHS) that maintain in-house systems, alongside smaller agencies that use the system to control access to high-security locations.”

TechCrunch: Amazon will pay you $10 in credit for your palm print biometrics

TechCrunch: Amazon will pay you $10 in credit for your palm print biometrics. “The retail and cloud giant says its palm scanning hardware ‘captures the minute characteristics of your palm — both surface-area details like lines and ridges as well as subcutaneous features such as vein patterns — to create your palm signature,’ which is then stored in the cloud and used to confirm your identity when you’re in one of its stores.”

Washington Post: China built the world’s largest facial recognition system. Now, it’s getting camera-shy.

Washington Post: China built the world’s largest facial recognition system. Now, it’s getting camera-shy.. “Guo Bing, a law professor in the Chinese city of Hangzhou, liked the zoo enough to purchase an annual pass. But he didn’t like it nearly enough to let the zoo take a high-resolution scan of his face. In what judges called the first case of its kind in China, Guo sued the zoo — and won.”

Ubergizmo: iOS 15’s Photos Will Be Better At Recognizing People

Ubergizmo: iOS 15’s Photos Will Be Better At Recognizing People. “One of the features of a lot of photo sharing platforms is facial recognition. This is something that Apple has built into its own Photos app. For the most part, we have to say that it does a good job at picking out faces, even if it’s in a group photo, but when it comes to photos where faces are partially hidden or obscured, then that’s when it falters.”

Gizmodo: 25 States Are Forcing Face Recognition on People Filing for Unemployment

Gizmodo: 25 States Are Forcing Face Recognition on People Filing for Unemployment. “We acclimatize to dangerous tech creep in a series of f*ck-it moments until the point at which we realize a foreseeably bad network is so pervasive, we reluctantly adopt it and move on. There was a time when social media, Amazon shopping, and home surveillance seemed optional—until they weren’t. Now in many states, you’ll have to surrender a faceprint to a private face recognition program in order to access basic government services like unemployment insurance. We’ve been here before.” Asterisk by me because I like these newsletters having some chance of getting through corporate filters.

CNET: Black teen kicked out of skating rink after facial recognition error

CNET: Black teen kicked out of skating rink after facial recognition error. “Public outcry against facial recognition software is on the rise this week as the parents of a Black teenager consider legal action against a Detroit-area roller-skating rink, accusing the rink of racially profiling their daughter with the technology. The rink banned teen Lamya Robinson on Saturday, according to a report from Fox 2 Detroit, accusing her of participating in a public brawl, after the rink’s facial recognition software wrongly identified her as a previous patron.”

TNW: This manual for a popular facial recognition tool shows just how much the software tracks people

TNW: This manual for a popular facial recognition tool shows just how much the software tracks people. “Lawmakers, privacy advocates, and civil rights organizations have also pushed against facial recognition because of error rates that disproportionately hurt people of color. A 2018 research paper from Joy Buolamwini and Timnit Gebru highlighted how facial recognition technology from companies like Microsoft and IBM is consistently less accurate in identifying people of color and women.”

Stanford Medicine: Stanford researcher’s cryptography can preserve genetic privacy in criminal DNA profiling

Stanford Medicine: Stanford researcher’s cryptography can preserve genetic privacy in criminal DNA profiling. “Crime scene DNA analysis can help identify perpetrators, but current methods may divulge the genetic information of innocent people. Cryptography can protect genetic privacy without hampering law enforcement, Stanford researchers say.”

The Cybersecurity 202: Activists and lawmakers increase calls for ban on federal use of facial recognition technology (Washington Post)

Washington Post: The Cybersecurity 202: Activists and lawmakers increase calls for ban on federal use of facial recognition technology. “A new report by the Government Accountability Office, the federal government’s main watchdog, makes it all the more necessary that the technology be banned at the federal level, they argue. At least 20 U.S. government agencies have deployed facial recognition technology since 2015, with many not knowing which systems they’re using, the nonpartisan watchdog found. The watchdog recommended that many of the agencies better track the systems and assess their risks.”