Penn State: Deepfakes expose vulnerabilities in certain facial recognition technology

Penn State: Deepfakes expose vulnerabilities in certain facial recognition technology. “Mobile devices use facial recognition technology to help users quickly and securely unlock their phones, make a financial transaction or access medical records. But facial recognition technologies that employ a specific user-detection method are highly vulnerable to deepfake-based attacks that could lead to significant security concerns for users and applications, according to new research involving the Penn State College of Information Sciences and Technology.”

Times of Israel: Google engineer identifies anonymous faces in WWII photos with AI facial recognition

Times of Israel: Google engineer identifies anonymous faces in WWII photos with AI facial recognition. “Walking past the countless photos of Holocaust survivors and victims at Warsaw’s POLIN Museum of the History of Polish Jews in 2016, New York-native Daniel Patt was haunted by the possibility that he was passing the faces of his own relatives without even knowing it…. he set to work creating and developing From Numbers to Names (N2N), an artificial intelligence-driven facial recognition platform that can scan through photos from prewar Europe and the Holocaust, linking them to people living today.”

CNET: Microsoft Restricts Its Facial Recognition Tools, Citing the Need for ‘Responsible AI’

CNET: Microsoft Restricts Its Facial Recognition Tools, Citing the Need for ‘Responsible AI’. “Microsoft is restricting access to its facial recognition tools, citing risks to society that the artificial intelligence systems could pose. The tech company released a 27-page ‘Responsible AI Standard’ on Tuesday that details the company’s goals toward equitable and trustworthy AI.”

Nature: AnimalTraits – a curated animal trait database for body mass, metabolic rate and brain size

Nature: AnimalTraits – a curated animal trait database for body mass, metabolic rate and brain size. “Trait databases have become important resources for large-scale comparative studies in ecology and evolution. Here we introduce the AnimalTraits database, a curated database of body mass, metabolic rate and brain size, in standardised units, for terrestrial animals. The database has broad taxonomic breadth, including tetrapods, arthropods, molluscs and annelids from almost 2000 species and 1000 genera.”

WIRED: The Race to Hide Your Voice

WIRED: The Race to Hide Your Voice. “As machines become better at understanding you through your voice, companies are cashing in. Voice recognition systems—from Siri and Alexa to those using your voice as your password—have proliferated in recent years as artificial intelligence and machine learning have unlocked the ability to understand not just what you are saying but who you are. Big Voice may be a $20 billion industry within a few years. And as the market grows, privacy-focused researchers are increasingly searching for ways to protect people from having their voice data used against them.”

Environmental Investigation Agency UK: Groundbreaking stripe-pattern database to boost enforcement in fight against illegal tiger trade

Environmental Investigation Agency UK: Groundbreaking stripe-pattern database to boost enforcement in fight against illegal tiger trade. “Our Tiger Campaign’s project aims to develop a tiger stripe detection AI tool to help identify individual tiger stripe pattern profiles. Tiger stripe patterns are as unique as human fingerprints and we plan to create a database comprising thousands of images of individual tiger stripe patterns, sourced by EIA staff and other organisations, which will allow the identification of tigers and skins seized in illegal trade.”

New York Times: Accused of Cheating by an Algorithm, and a Professor She Had Never Met

New York Times: Accused of Cheating by an Algorithm, and a Professor She Had Never Met. “A Florida teenager taking a biology class at a community college got an upsetting note this year. A start-up called Honorlock had flagged her as acting suspiciously during an exam in February. She was, she said in an email to The New York Times, a Black woman who had been ‘wrongfully accused of academic dishonesty by an algorithm.’ What happened, however, was more complicated than a simple algorithmic mistake. It involved several humans, academic bureaucracy and an automated facial detection tool from Amazon called Rekognition.”

NY Appellate Court: Law enforcement agencies can’t use DNA database for familial searches (Gothamist)

Gothamist: NY Appellate Court: Law enforcement agencies can’t use DNA database for familial searches. “Law enforcement agencies can’t use a state DNA database to investigate the possible relatives of people whose genetic material matches those on file, a panel of state appellate judges ruled Thursday. The court found the use of the database can disproportionately target people of color.”