Phys .org: Using artificial intelligence to track birds’ dark-of-night migrations

Phys .org: Using artificial intelligence to track birds’ dark-of-night migrations. “Now, with colleagues from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and others, senior authors Sheldon and Subhransu Maji and lead author Tsung-Yu Lin at UMass’s College of Information and Computer Sciences unveil their new tool ‘MistNet.’ In Sheldon’s words, it’s the ‘latest and greatest in machine learning’ to extract bird data from the radar record and to take advantage of the treasure trove of bird migration information in the decades-long radar data archives. The tool’s name refers to the fine, almost invisible, ‘mist nets’ that ornithologists use to capture migratory songbirds.”

Digital twins for kākāpō and AI to track kiwi calls: How tech is helping save NZ’s endangered birds (CIO)

CIO: Digital twins for kākāpō and AI to track kiwi calls: How tech is helping save NZ’s endangered birds . “There are 200 kākāpō in New Zealand, and each and every one of them is able to be monitored by the Department of Conservation. ‘I describe it as having a digital twin for every one of these birds,’ says Mike Edginton, CIO at the Department of Conservation (DoC).”

BBC: Scotland-led study into plastic pollution impact on birds

BBC: Scotland-led study into plastic pollution impact on birds . “Pictures of birds entangled in plastic and nests built with the waste are being collected by Scottish researchers. They want people from around the world to contribute to the ‘citizen science’ project by uploading their images to a new website.”

The World Outdoors: Online eBird platform continues to evolve (London Free Press)

London Free Press: The World Outdoors: Online eBird platform continues to evolve. “It’s interesting to reflect on the evolution of the online eBird platform that supports citizen science. Launched in the U.S. in 2002 by the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the Audubon Society, its reach now spans the globe and in nature communities it represents a gold standard.”

Cornell University: Scientists propose bird conservation plan based on eBird data

Cornell University: Scientists propose bird conservation plan based on eBird data. “An international team of scientists used eBird, the Cornell Lab of Ornithology’s global citizen science database, to calculate how to sufficiently conserve habitat across the Western Hemisphere for all the habitats these birds use throughout their annual cycle of breeding, migration and overwintering. The study provides planners with guidance on the locations and amounts of land that must be conserved for 30% of the global populations for each of 117 bird species that migrate to the Neotropics (Central and South America, the Caribbean and southern North America).”

BirdLife International: This map lets you track bird migration in real time

BirdLife International: This map lets you track bird migration in real time. “Springtime. Flowers are blooming, temperatures are rising, and all over the world, birds are migrating. But where are they going? Where have they been? Where do the birds we regularly see in our backyards travel? Now, a new tool allows individuals to see this data in real time. With Euro Bird Portal’s LIVE viewer, individuals can look at weekly animated maps dating back to January 2010 up to the present, that show where birds have been sighted in real time.”

New Web Site Provides Digitized Models of Bird Bones

Read an article about this but it didn’t include the URL, so I’m going straight to the source to tell you about Fauna Toolkit: Bird Bones. From the home page: “A portal to 3D digitised models of bird bones from museum collections. 159 bones from 28 species in 22 families and 19 orders are now available from the Index below.”