CNET: A Virtual Tour Uncovers the Hidden History of Black Disenfranchisement

CNET: A Virtual Tour Uncovers the Hidden History of Black Disenfranchisement. “[Old Lick Cemetery]’s disturbing story would likely remain a footnote in the city’s history were it not for a project called Hidden in Plain Site, the brainchild of creative agency BrownBaylor. It’s designed to resurface the lost narrative of marginalized Black people across the US with experiences you can view through a browser or virtual reality headset.”

Post and Courier: Oral history project aims to connect recent activism to larger civil rights movement

Post and Courier: Oral history project aims to connect recent activism to larger civil rights movement. “About a year ago, local filmmaker Joshua Parks wanted to interview activists who were affiliated with the Black Lives Matter movement in Charleston. He approached two staff members of the Avery Research Center for African American History and Culture at the College of Charleston — Erica Veal and Daron Calhoun. Veal, an archivist, and Calhoun, coordinator of public programming and the Race and Social Justice Initiative, demurred. They weren’t eager to revisit the challenges and traumas of the recent past, Veal said. They told Parks, then a graduate assistant at the Avery, to circle back.”

Globe and Mail: Introducing the Black Fashion Canada Database

Globe and Mail: Introducing the Black Fashion Canada Database. “Launched this week, [the site] hosts a profile of each individual, breaking down their early life and career and how they broke barriers in the fashion world. [Charmaine] Gooden and her team have prepared stories on legendary Black models, actors and performers from across Canada, including Hondo Flemming, Linda Carter, Denise McLeod and Ethne Grimes de Viennes, many of whom are alive and agreed to be interviewed for the series.”

NBC News: How one young history buff is preserving the Gullah Geechee community on TikTok

NBC News: How one young history buff is preserving the Gullah Geechee community on TikTok . “The Gullah Geechee people make up one of the oldest and most extraordinary communities in the United States. But if you’ve never heard of them, it might be because their history is often sifted out of textbooks, and the longevity of their culture is now in danger. This distinctly African American community began on the eastern coastal islands — spanning from Florida all the way up to North Carolina in the 1600s. Slaves, mostly from West Africa, lived in complete isolation from the continental United States, separated by rivers, swamps and waterways that weren’t easy to cross.”

University of Michigan: U-M Black student database through 1970 is now public

University of Michigan: U-M Black student database through 1970 is now public. “A new public database of African American students created by the University of Michigan documents students who attended U-M between 1853 and as recently as 1970. A comprehensive compilation of this nature did not previously exist at the university and remains very rare for universities across the country. In the process, hundreds of compelling stories have been uncovered surrounding segregated housing, relocation after slavery and ‘segregation scholarships,’ which originated in the 1920s.”

Juneteenth: A reading list (Virginia Commonwealth University)

Virginia Commonwealth University: Juneteenth: A reading list. “Juneteenth commemorates the day in 1865 when Union troops arrived in Galveston, Texas, and informed enslaved people there that they were free, some two and a half years after President Abraham Lincoln put into effect the Emancipation Proclamation. Sometimes called Freedom Day or Emancipation Day, the holiday has a rich history of celebration, remembrance and education that is continuing today on a larger, national scale. VCU News asked faculty, as well as staff from VCU Libraries, to suggest books that help readers understand and celebrate Juneteenth and all that it represents.”

Essence: NFL Partners With Chicago Non-Profit To Tell The Stories Of Legendary Black Players

Essence: NFL Partners With Chicago Non-Profit To Tell The Stories Of Legendary Black Players. “The National Football League and NFL Films have announced a new partnership with the Chicago based non-profit, The HistoryMakers to highlight the stories of African American players and others who have played a major role in the league’s history. The NFL will provide the organization, which has the nation’s largest African American video oral history archive, funding and hundreds of hours of footage from interviews with Black football legends from the past and present, including Pro Football Hall of Fame players.”

Johns Hopkins University: Black Beyond Data

Johns Hopkins University: Black Beyond Data. “This is one of [Jessica Marie] Johnson’s passions as a historian. To tell the stories of Black people—particularly Black women—in the Atlantic African diaspora during the centuries of slavery. She highlights the relationships, warmth, and intimacy they created despite the harshest of circumstances, as well as the ways in which they wielded intelligence, creativity, and interpersonal skills to strive for freedom. But Johnson is equally committed to opening access to the myriad amounts of data that contain information about Black life and Black people, both historical and contemporary.”

LitHub: How Empirical Databases Have Changed Our Understanding of Early American Slavery

LitHub: How Empirical Databases Have Changed Our Understanding of Early American Slavery. “In historical scholarship during the early 21st century, some of these new methods and tools of truth-seeking have been put to work on a large scale in the history of slavery and race in America. Among the most important and useful of these tools are the careful construction of empirical databases. Increasingly, this work has been done by teams of scholars, who combine traditional sources with digital methods on a new scale.”

Alabama shipwreck holds key to the past for descendants of enslaved Africans: “Be sure that that legacy lives on” (CBS News)

CBS News: Alabama shipwreck holds key to the past for descendants of enslaved Africans: “Be sure that that legacy lives on”. “Work performed this month will help answer a question residents of the area called Africatown USA are anxious to resolve: Can remnants of the slave ship Clotilda be retrieved from the water to both fill out details about their heritage and to serve as an attraction that might revitalize the place their ancestors built after emancipation?”

Florida International University: FIU awarded National Endowment for the Humanities grant to highlight contributions of Miami’s Black residents

Florida International University: FIU awarded National Endowment for the Humanities grant to highlight contributions of Miami’s Black residents. “The grant will help provide enhanced access to the papers of Dana A. Dorsey, a successful businessman known as Miami’s first Black millionaire. At the project’s conclusion, implemented data collection methodologies and access strategies will be analyzed and shared through a white paper to help establish best practices in the field. The paper will include plans for potential partnerships and will identify additional resources, collections, organizations, and individuals to help expand the work.”