The Next Web: Wikipedia co-founder wants to put the world’s knowledge on the blockchain

The Next Web: Wikipedia co-founder wants to put the world’s knowledge on the blockchain. “Everipedia today announced Wikipedia co-founder Dr. Larry Sanger would be joining the company as it prepares to bring its online encyclopedia to the blockchain. Blockchain is best known as the technology that Bitcoin, Ethereum, and other cryptocurrencies run on, but its applications go far beyond simply making the Winklevoss twins rich. ”

Harvard Business Review: Blockchain Could Help Us Reclaim Control of Our Personal Data

Harvard Business Review: Blockchain Could Help Us Reclaim Control of Our Personal Data. “It’s a strange world we live in when large companies such as Experian, Equifax, and TransUnion are able to store huge quantities of our personal data and profit from it in a way that doesn’t always benefit us. And when those same companies lose our personal data and make us susceptible to identity theft, there’s virtually nothing we can do about it. Equifax lost the data of more than 140 million people, and recompense is not forthcoming. Meanwhile, the CEO may be stepping down with a pension worth $18 million. Clearly, the system is broken, and it’s time to stop and ask ourselves why we continue to rely on a system that doesn’t stand up to the challenges we face in a digital society.”

Coindesk: Centers for Disease Control to Launch First Blockchain Test on Disaster Relief

Coindesk: Centers for Disease Control to Launch First Blockchain Test on Disaster Relief. “For public health practitioners, the ability to quickly collect, analyze and take action on data is paramount to containing the spread of a deadly new virus or disease. But despite the advent of big data technologies, collecting this information today remains a highly cumbersome and time-consuming process, explains Jim Nasr, chief software architect at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the arm of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services tasked with combating the spread of preventive and chronic disease. Now in search of a better solution, Nasr is eyeing a blockchain proof-of-concept he believes could facilitate the more rapid and reliable capture of epidemiological data in crisis situations.”

Times of Malta: Malta becomes first country to explore blockchain education certificates

Times of Malta: Malta becomes first country to explore blockchain education certificates. “The government has launched a pilot project to explore the possibility of issuing educational certificates on the blockchain. The project will see diplomas at MCAST, training certificates at ITS, and equivalence statements, accreditation and licensure from the NCFHE, all issued on the emerging technology this year.”

Bitcoin Magazine: OpenTimestamps Has Timestamped the Entire Internet Archive — Here’s How

Bitcoin Magazine: OpenTimestamps Has Timestamped the Entire Internet Archive — Here’s How. “OpenTimestamps, a project led by Bitcoin Core developer Peter Todd, just made sure the Internet Archive cannot be forged. Well, sort of. In a blog post published last week, the developer and consultant explained how he used his OpenTimestamps project to timestamp all the Internet Archive’s 750,000,000 files onto Bitcoin’s blockchain. This means that no one — not even the Internet Archive itself — can modify this collection of books, videos, images and other records; not unnoticeably.”

Harvard Business Review: Using Blockchain to Keep Public Data Public

Harvard Business Review: Using Blockchain to Keep Public Data Public. “Data is under attack. And it is the leaders of our government and economy who are waging this war. They have made it acceptable to manipulate raw data in a way that benefits them financially or politically — and it has lowered public confidence in the veracity of information. These are institutions we rely on every day to make the policy and business decisions that affect our economy and society at large. If anyone is allowed to simply change a number or delete a data set, who — and what — are citizens supposed to believe? How can we get our data back? The answer lies with the public — public blockchains, to be specific.”