How to Start Vlogging: 11 Tips for Absolute Beginners (MakeUseOf)

MakeUseOf: How to Start Vlogging: 11 Tips for Absolute Beginners. “It might seem as simple as turning on a camera, saying your piece, and uploading the video—but there’s a lot more that goes into vlogging, especially since it’s become a competitive multi-million dollar industry. If you’re interested in becoming a vlogger but have no idea where to start, you’re in the right place. We’re going to give you several essential tips every beginner needs to know.” This is more of a “things you need to think about,” a good place to start, but for techniques and setups, you’ll need more in-depth articles.

Baltimore Sun: This Baltimore blogger is preserving Maryland’s culinary history through maps

Baltimore Sun: This Baltimore blogger is preserving Maryland’s culinary history through maps. “Kara Mae Harris is dedicated to preserving Maryland’s culinary history. The Remington resident has spent the last few years logging thousands of recipes from historic cookbooks and plotting them on maps to display the region’s geographical relationship with food.”

Remarkable Records: A New Blog Series! (The Texas Records)

The Texas Record: Remarkable Records: A New Blog Series!. “In the course of our work, we’ve become intimately familiar with the retention schedules for state agencies, public universities, and local governments. Our team keeps detailed lists of record series that need improvement and there are rarely times when we don’t have one of the schedules on the revisions chopping block. Some of us have adopted favorite records series, such as well-written descriptions or retention periods that support efficient workflows, but there are also some that are stinkers. So, we want to share some of the records series we like (or dislike) and why.”

Business Insider: Google has pulled down a propaganda blog backing the military coup in Myanmar after outcry by online activists

Business Insider: Google has pulled down a propaganda blog backing the military coup in Myanmar after outcry by online activists. “Google has pulled down a propaganda blog supporting the military coup in Myanmar after the blog was discovered by an online activist this week. The blog was managed and hosted via the Google-owned Blogger platform under the URL seniorgeneralminaunghlaing.com, taking its name from the Myanmar military leader who has seized control of the country.”

The Verge: A college student used GPT-3 to write fake blog posts and ended up at the top of Hacker News

The Verge: A college student used GPT-3 to write fake blog posts and ended up at the top of Hacker News. “College student Liam Porr used the language-generating AI tool GPT-3 to produce a fake blog post that recently landed in the No. 1 spot on Hacker News, MIT Technology Review reported. Porr was trying to demonstrate that the content produced by GPT-3 could fool people into believing it was written by a human. And, he told MIT Technology Review, ‘it was super easy, actually, which was the scary part.’”

Techdirt: Patent Troll Gets Court To Order Startup It Sued To ‘Edit’ Blog Post; Troll Now Asks Startup To Get Us To Change Our Techdirt Post

Techdirt: Patent Troll Gets Court To Order Startup It Sued To ‘Edit’ Blog Post; Troll Now Asks Startup To Get Us To Change Our Techdirt Post. “So, first off, I don’t see how this is possibly allowed under the 1st Amendment. Directly ordering a company to edit a blog post to remove a request to share the blog post on social media seems like a fairly blatant infringement of the 1st Amendment. A company should certainly have the right to notify its community that it is in the middle of a costly legal battle (one that it believes is frivolous), and part of getting people to understand how serious it is is asking for that information to be shared.”

Arizona State University: ASU researchers launch blog series exploring equitable research practices

Arizona State University: ASU researchers launch blog series exploring equitable research practices. “As public attention has turned to systemic inequities in institutional cultures like those in police forces, medical care, school systems and food production, some researchers at Arizona State University are turning their attention to academic culture to explore how researchers might embody more equitable research practices. This week, ASU postdoctoral scholar Schuyler Marquez launched a new series, ‘Embodying Reciprocity: Relationality and Redistribution in Anthropology,’ on the collaborative blog Footnotes, along with ASU doctoral candidate Taylor Genovese and University of Chicago doctoral candidate Sonia Grant.”

US Copyright Office: Copyright Office Issues Final Rule to Create Group Registration Option for Short Online Literary Works

US Copyright Office: Copyright Office Issues Final Rule to Create Group Registration Option for Short Online Literary Works. “The U.S. Copyright Office has issued a final rule creating a new group registration option for short online literary works such as blog entries, social media posts, and short online articles. The Office initiated this rulemaking in December 2018, when it issued a proposed rule that would allow applicants to register up to fifty short online literary works with one application and one filing fee.”

Man of Many: 9-Eyes Captures Human Beings in Their Natural Habitat

Man of Many: 9-Eyes Captures Human Beings in Their Natural Habitat. “Named for the nine cameras that the Google Street View cars use, the 9-Eyes blog is an homage to just how beautifully weird our world is. It has been a massive undertaking, years in the process, but amongst the sea of mundane and boring photos, there are plenty of gems. You’ll find everything from kids playing in the streets, to military personnel riding in the back of a jeep with fully automatic weapons. Animals make an appearance, including a tiger walking across an empty parking lot, or a monkey sitting on a wall taking in the view. Vignettes of everyday life are presented without any context, often leaving you wondering what the story is behind the image that was captured.”

British Library: 10 years of the Medieval Manuscripts Blog

British Library: 10 years of the Medieval Manuscripts Blog. “This month is an exciting anniversary for us: it has been ten years since the British Library’s award-winning Medieval Manuscripts Blog began back in February 2010. It’s a decade that has seen large-scale digitisation, blockbuster exhibitions, exciting acquisitions and fascinating discoveries, and the Blog has been our main way of letting you know about them all. We aim to be inspiring, informative and amusing and above all to share with you the manuscripts love. To celebrate our big anniversary, join us in looking back at some of the Blog’s highlights over the years.”

Google Classroom (still) to the rescue: Blogging, vlogging, and podcasting (Ditch that Textbook)

Ditch that Textbook: Google Classroom (still) to the rescue: Blogging, vlogging, and podcasting. “My top performing post by far debuted in January, 2018, and deals with how to use the new Google Sites for blogging while combining it with Google Classroom to provide our students with the authentic audience they need and the feedback via comments that are still safe. Since then, I’ve opened up the platforms to include Adobe Spark Page and Wakelet, giving my high school students control over which platform they prefer, but I still sitesmash (like an app smash…but with websites) with Google Classroom to give me the control over the comments that I prefer.”

The Guardian: Happy 25th year, blogging. You’ve grown up, but social media is still having a brawl

The Guardian: Happy 25th year, blogging. You’ve grown up, but social media is still having a brawl. “…the blogosphere met the three criteria for such a public sphere: universal access; rational debate (any topic could be raised by any participant); and the disregard of social rank. And as with the Usenet groups of the early, pre-web internet, it was full of vigorous and sometimes raucous discussion. But then along came social media, in the shape of Facebook (2004), YouTube (2005) and Twitter (2006) in particular.”

Library of Virginia: Welcome to the new blog of the Library of Virginia, The UncommonWealth!

Library of Virginia: Welcome to the new blog of the Library of Virginia, The UncommonWealth!. “As they exist, our blogs Fit to Print and Out of the Box capture only a fraction of all that the Library has and does. In The UncommonWealth: Voices from the Library of Virginia, we aim to expand our scope to help you learn more about what we do, why we do it, and how our efforts relate to current issues and events. We also plan to tell you more about your fellow Virginians who work here at the Library, spotlighting staff members, specialized professions, and public libraries.”