The Guardian: ‘Smart’ male chastity device can be controlled by hackers, users warned

The Guardian: ‘Smart’ male chastity device can be controlled by hackers, users warned. “The maker of a ‘smart’ male chastity device has recommended using a screwdriver to break it open after warnings it can be locked remotely by hackers. The Bluetooth-controlled Cellmate device can only be unlocked via an app. Its manufacturer, the Chinese company Qiui, issued a video titled ‘When nothing else works’, showing the screwdriver fix.”

NBC News: Covid apps went through the hype cycle. Now, they might be ready to work.

NBC News: Covid apps went through the hype cycle. Now, they might be ready to work.. “Jen Tracy, 36, was sick of hearing people bickering about how to respond to the coronavirus pandemic and last week, New Jersey offered an alternative she liked better: a smartphone app. Tracy, who lives in Pine Hill, New Jersey, became one of the early adopters of an app the state rolled out to try to slow the spread of Covid-19. The app displays statistics, such as the percentage of people who are reporting symptoms, and maybe more importantly, it’s designed to alert people if they’ve been near someone else who’s tested positive.”

Make Tech Easier: New Vulnerability, BLURtooth, Attacks Bluetooth Devices

Make Tech Easier: New Vulnerability, BLURtooth, Attacks Bluetooth Devices. “It seems nothing is safe from technology attacks these days. Attackers will find a way to attack any device or service that it is able to. A recent vulnerability, BLURtooth, attacks the component used for setting up authentication keys when pairing Bluetooth-capable devices. Yes, even that is something you need to worry about not being safe.”

Washington Post: I downloaded America’s first coronavirus exposure app. You should too.

Washington Post: I downloaded America’s first coronavirus exposure app. You should too.. “For the past week and a half, 35 Washington Post staff members have been helping me test America’s first exposure-notification app using technology from Apple and Google. It’s called Covidwise, and works in the state of Virginia. Made by state health departments, similar apps are also now available in North Dakota (Care19 Alert), Wyoming (also called Care19 Alert), and Alabama (Guidesafe). A Pennsylvania app is due to arrive in September and will be compatible with one from Delaware. In total, 20 states and territories are developing apps that will cover nearly half the U.S. population. (We’ll continue to update as more arrive.)”

VentureBeat: Bluetooth bracelets are an identity-blind option for digital contact tracing

VentureBeat: Bluetooth bracelets are an identity-blind option for digital contact tracing. “Bluetooth tags are standalone Bluetooth radios that can be deployed in wearable bracelets. Thanks to recent developments in IoT technology, Bluetooth bracelets can cost just a dollar or two and run for 10 years on a coin cell battery. Therefore, in areas where people don’t own or operate smartphones, governments can affordably deploy Bluetooth bracelets. Ideally, Bluetooth bracelets and smartphones can complement each other in enabling an effective digital tracing solution.”

Tom’s Guide: Apple and Google team up to fight coronavirus with contact tracing

Tom’s Guide: Apple and Google team up to fight coronavirus with contact tracing. “Today, Apple and Google announced a surprising collaboration: the two will unite to bring contact tracing to their smartphones in order to fight coronavirus. And both companies are committed to doing so while respecting user privacy. In posts made by both Apple and Google, the companies declared ‘a joint effort to enable the use of Bluetooth technology to help governments and health agencies reduce the spread of the virus, with user privacy and security central to the design.'”

EurekAlert: Bluetooth signals from your smartphone could automate COVID-19 contact tracing

EurekAlert: Bluetooth signals from your smartphone could automate COVID-19 contact tracing. “A team led by MIT researchers and including experts from many institutions is developing a system that augments ‘manual’ contact tracing by public health officials, while preserving the privacy of all individuals. The system relies on short-range Bluetooth signals emitted from people’s smartphones. These signals represent random strings of numbers, likened to ‘chirps’ that other nearby smartphones can remember hearing.”

TechHive: Google is ‘aware’ of buggy Bluetooth for Home and Nest speakers and working on a fix

TechHive: Google is ‘aware’ of buggy Bluetooth for Home and Nest speakers and working on a fix. “For months, users of Google’s Home and Nest speakers have been complaining that their devices can’t hold a steady Bluetooth connection to a phone or an external speaker, and now Google says it’s looking for a fix.”

The Register: A dirty dozen of Bluetooth bugs threaten to reboot, freeze, or hack your trendy gizmos from close range

The Register: A dirty dozen of Bluetooth bugs threaten to reboot, freeze, or hack your trendy gizmos from close range. “The flaws, collectively dubbed SWEYNTOOTH (because every bug has to have its own name these days), allow a suitably skilled attacker to crash or deadlock BLE devices, or to bypass pairing security to gain arbitrary read and write access to device functions.”

Engadget: Android security flaw lets attackers send malware over Bluetooth

Engadget: Android security flaw lets attackers send malware over Bluetooth. “If you’re using a not-quite current Android phone, you’ll probably want to check for an update. Security researchers at ERNW have detailed a vulnerability, BlueFrag, that lets attackers silently deliver malware to and steal data from nearby phones running Android 8 Oreo or Android 9 Pie.”

BBC: Hong Kong protesters using Bluetooth Bridgefy app

BBC: Hong Kong protesters using Bluetooth Bridgefy app. “Pro-democracy protesters in Hong Kong have been turning to a new app to communicate – one that does not use the internet and is therefore harder for the Chinese authorities to trace. Bridgefy is based on Bluetooth and allows protesters to communicate with each other without internet connection.”

The Next Web: Critical KNOB exploit penetrates gaping Bluetooth vulnerability

The Next Web, and did you really need that image?: Critical KNOB exploit penetrates gaping Bluetooth vulnerability. “Researchers have discovered a vulnerability in Bluetooth’s authentication protocols which, if properly executed, could allow an attacker to conduct a man-in-the-middle attack between two paired devices. This could see an adversary intercept and alter files while they’re in transit, as well as potentially listening in on conversations conducted via Bluetooth.”

TechCrunch: A pair of new Bluetooth security flaws expose wireless access points to attack

TechCrunch: A pair of new Bluetooth security flaws expose wireless access points to attack. “The two bugs are found in Bluetooth Low Energy chips built by Texas Instruments, which networking device makers — like Aruba, Cisco and Meraki — use in their line-up of enterprise wireless access points. Although the two bugs are distinctly different and target a range of models, the vulnerabilities can allow an attacker to take over an access point and break into an enterprise network or jump over the virtual walls that separate networks.”