The Bookseller: Who owns digital stories?

The Bookseller: Who owns digital stories?. “Now, imagine I am a producing a film and want to quote a section of a book in the film, and use part of an audio track. As well as enhancing the story within the film, this will grow the value of the film product itself. So the process I take is to contact the copyright holders, do a deal and carry on with my production. Even if I base my film loosely on an existing text, I clear the rights. There are legal, moral and commercial reasons to do this. In contrast, Google is using scanned copyrighted material to build its current and future products, and as far as we can tell from the settlement with the Writer’s Guild seven years ago, without any reference to authors being compensated for the use of their work. “

University of California San Diego: Hate spoilers? This AI tool spots them for you

University of California San Diego: Hate spoilers? This AI tool spots them for you. “Did social media spoil the Avengers’ Endgame movie for you? Or maybe one of the Game of Thrones books? A team of researchers from the University of California San Diego is working to make sure that doesn’t happen again. They have developed an AI-based system that can flag spoilers in online reviews of books and TV shows.”

Internet Archive: Most 20th Century Books Unavailable to Internet Users – We Can Fix That

Internet Archive: Most 20th Century Books Unavailable to Internet Users – We Can Fix That. “The books of the 20th century are largely not online. They are mostly not available from even the biggest booksellers. And, libraries who have collected hard copies of these books have not been able to deliver them in a cost-efficient, simple, digital form to their patrons. The way libraries could fill that gap is to adopt and deliver a controlled digital lending service. The Internet Archive is trying to do its part but needs others to join in.”

CBC: UBC prof helps create an online database of banned books

CBC: UBC prof helps create an online database of banned books. “A life-size replica of the Athenian Parthenon made of ‘banned books’ stands as a towering art installation in Kassel, Germany. The Parthenon of Book resides in the same spot where Nazi-sympathizers burned 2,000 prohibited books in 1933. Now, with the help of a UBC professor, the project has resulted in Die Kasseler Liste — an online searchable database of books that have been, or currently are, banned or censored somewhere in the world.”

Everybody’s Libraries: More and better copyright data online for serials and books

Everybody’s Libraries: More and better copyright data online for serials and books. “It’s getting easier over time to find and use data on copyrights, and thereby to find and make use of materials in the public domain. Here’s a quick update on what’s new and what’s coming, in my projects and elsewhere.”

BuzzFeed News: YA Twitter Can Be Toxic, But It Also Points Out Real Problems

BuzzFeed News: YA Twitter Can Be Toxic, But It Also Points Out Real Problems. “However flawed social media may be, it’s still an important tool for giving marginalized voices and diversity advocates a much-needed platform. And if we set aside, for a moment, the focus on the authors; if we pause to remember that there are bad-faith voices in all parts of Twitter, not just YA; and if we step back and consider that the power to publish or cancel a book lies not with internet critics but with publishers and authors — then there’s another aspect of these stories that’s often ignored in mainstream discussions: What if these critics, with their focus on representation and diversity, have a point?”