Mashable: 25 Stephen King short films are being shown at this virtual festival. Some have never been released.

Mashable: 25 Stephen King short films are being shown at this virtual festival. Some have never been released.. “The Stephen King Rules Dollar Baby Film Festival, a virtual event which will stream a number of short film adaptations based on the author’s work (including some which haven’t previously been released), is set to run from April 23 to 25 — and the best part is, the whole thing is free to join. 25 adaptations will be shown in total, each based on King short stories like Popsy, The Woman in the Room, and The Last Rung on the Ladder.”

Publishers Weekly: ALA Releases 2020 Most Challenged Books List

Publishers Weekly: ALA Releases 2020 Most Challenged Books List. “For a third year in a row, Alex Gino’s George has topped the American Library Association’s list of most challenged book in American libraries. The ALA’s Most Challenged Books list, released annually in conjunction with National Library Week, which runs April 4-10 this year, tracks attempts to ban or restrict access to books across the United States and raises awareness of censorship efforts in our libraries and schools.”

MIT Press News: The MIT Press launches new open access collection of 34 classic architecture and urban studies titles

MIT Press News: The MIT Press launches new open access collection of 34 classic architecture and urban studies titles . “Today, the MIT Press launched MIT Press Open Architecture and Urban Studies, a robust digital collection of classic and previously out-of-print architecture and urban studies books, on their digital book platform MIT Press Direct. The collection was funded by a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation as part of the Humanities Open Book Program, which they co-sponsored with the National Endowment for the Humanities.”

Fighting online extremism: Polarization in social media and how to improve the public conversation (Phys .org)

Phys .org: Fighting online extremism: Polarization in social media and how to improve the public conversation. “In his new book, “Breaking the Social Media Prism,” [Chris] Bail dives into political polarization and its manifestations on social media platforms like Twitter and Facebook. Spun from research he and others have done at Duke’s Polarization Lab, Bail examines why political partisans are so unlikely to be swayed by other points of view, and offers tips and tools for people attempting to navigate social media in good faith.”

Artificial intelligence: Are we doing it all wrong? (CNET)

CNET: Artificial intelligence: Are we doing it all wrong?. “Jeff Hawkins is co-founder of machine intelligence company Numenta and author of a new book ‘A Thousand Brains: A New Theory of Intelligence’ that offers a theory of what’s missing in current AI. I don’t normally do author interviews, but Jeff has a history of knowing where things are going in tech, including, in my opinion, being a primary developer of the modern smartphone at Handspring and Palm.”

Vanity Fair: Cracking the Case of London’s Elusive, Acrobatic Rare-Book Thieves

Vanity Fair: Cracking the Case of London’s Elusive, Acrobatic Rare-Book Thieves. “‘Impossible,’ said David Ward. The London Metropolitan Police constable looked up. Some 50 feet above him, he saw that someone had carved a gaping hole through a skylight. Standing in the Frontier Forwarding warehouse in Feltham, West London, he could hear the howl of jets from neighboring Heathrow Airport as they roared overhead. At Ward’s feet lay three open trunks, heavy-duty steel cases. They were empty. A few books lay strewn about. Those trunks had previously been full of books. Not just any books. The missing ones, 240 in all, included early versions of some of the most significant printed works of European history.”

Machines that learn: The origin story of artificial intelligence (Christian Science Monitor)

Christian Science Monitor: Machines that learn: The origin story of artificial intelligence. “Lee Sedol, a world champion in the Chinese strategy board game Go, faced a new kind of adversary at a 2016 match in Seoul. Developers at DeepMind, an artificial intelligence startup acquired by Google, had fed 30 million Go moves into a deep neural network. Their creation, dubbed AlphaGo, then figured out which moves worked by playing millions of games against itself, learning at a faster rate than any human ever could. The match, which AlphaGo won 4 to 1, ‘was the moment when the new movement in artificial intelligence exploded into the public consciousness,’ technology journalist Cade Metz writes in his engaging new book, ‘Genius Makers: The Mavericks Who Brought AI to Google, Facebook, and the World.’”

CNN: Children’s book on Dr. Anthony Fauci set for June

CNN: Children’s book on Dr. Anthony Fauci set for June. “Dr. Anthony Fauci, who has served under seven US presidents and has guided the national response to Covid-19, will soon be immortalized in a children’s book. Simon & Schuster is putting the finishing touches on ‘Dr. Fauci: How a Boy from Brooklyn Became America’s Doctor,’ a book written by Kate Messner and illustrated by Alexandra Bye.”

Ohio University: University Libraries joins HathiTrust

Ohio University: University Libraries joins HathiTrust. “In terms of HathiTrust implementation at University Libraries, the OHIO community now has access to the digital versions of materials that the University Libraries owns in print, which have been digitized by a HathiTrust member. The University Libraries will also have the option of digitizing and depositing new texts into HathiTrust to increase access to those materials and preserve them for the future.”

Newswise: What happens in your brain when you ‘lose yourself’ in fiction

Newswise: What happens in your brain when you ‘lose yourself’ in fiction. “If you count yourself among those who lose themselves in the lives of fictional characters, scientists now have a better idea of how that happens. Researchers found that the more immersed people tend to get into ‘becoming’ a fictional character, the more they use the same part of the brain to think about the character as they do to think about themselves.”

Hunting for books in the ruins: how Syria’s rebel librarians found hope (The Guardian)

The Guardian: Hunting for books in the ruins: how Syria’s rebel librarians found hope. “These young Syrians cohabited with death night and day. Most of them had already lost everything – their homes, their friends, their parents. Amid the chaos, they clung to books as if to life, hoping for a better tomorrow, for a better political system. Driven by their thirst for culture, they were quietly developing an idea of what democracy should be. An idea that challenged the regime’s tyranny and Islamic State’s book burners.”

Game Jam Winner Spotlight: Rhythm Action Gatsby (Techdirt)

Techdirt: Game Jam Winner Spotlight: Rhythm Action Gatsby. “From the name alone, you can probably guess what the game is: rhythm action games are a popular genre, and hey, why not make one for The Great Gatsby? The premise is presented as a joke, with the designer describing it as ‘the way F. Scott Fitzgerald would have wanted his legacy to be maintained’ — but the game doesn’t just lean on this one bit of amusing silliness, nor does it cut any corners in fulfilling its promise. Rather, it’s full of handcrafted original material.”

Library of Congress: New! Read Around the States

Library of Congress: New! Read Around the States. “Today we are launching a project called Read Around the States. It features videos with U.S. members of Congress who have chosen a special book for young people that is connected to their states – either through the book’s setting or author, or perhaps simply because it is a favorite of the member.”