The Wonky Donkey: How Infringement Helped Create A Best Seller… Which Would Be Impossible Under Article 13 (Techdirt)

Techdirt: The Wonky Donkey: How Infringement Helped Create A Best Seller… Which Would Be Impossible Under Article 13. “That video is almost certainly copyright infringement. It’s a derivative work with the grandmother reading the entire book out loud. Obviously, neither the author nor the publisher mind that this happened. Indeed, they’re pretty happy about it. And so this could just be yet another example of where copyright infringement actually ends up helping the copyright holder significantly. But this is also an excellent example of the massive harm that the EU is about to do with Article 13 and the EU Copyright Directive.”

MakeUseOf: How to Find a Book Without Knowing the Title or Author

MakeUseOf: How to Find a Book Without Knowing the Title or Author. “Tracking down that long-lost book is like a treasure hunt. In the old days, you could have asked the librarian. Today, search engines like Google have the librarian beat. Here are some tips to help you find a book without knowing the title or author.” “Have the librarian beat”…I don’t know about THAT… but there are a lot of tools here.

Purdue University: Religion in China is highly diverse by region, research shows

Purdue University: Religion in China is highly diverse by region, research shows. “When people think about religion in China, they tend to think first about Buddhism. ‘But that is not the case in many places in China, not anymore,’ said Fengang Yang, author of the book ‘Atlas of Religion in China: Social and Geographical Contexts.’… ‘To complement the Atlas book, we are developing the Online Spiritual Atlas of China. OSAC will allow users to view the religious landscape by province, prefecture, or county, input information of religious sites that are not already in the database, or suggest corrections of existing sites,’ Yang said. ‘We are also developing plans to expand the mapping of religion and society beyond China.'”

ASU Library’s High Density Collection: where books go to outlive you (The State Press)

The State Press: ASU Library’s High Density Collection: where books go to outlive you. “Like something out of a sci-fi novel, Arizona State University’s High Density Collection holds within its bunkers 1.6 million books. To call it a labyrinth, like the door factory in Monsters Inc. or a football field full of books, doesn’t completely capture this ice-cold collection facility. Rather, it’s as if the Room of Requirement in Harry Potter was made to hold 6 million books, meticulously sorted into fastidious shelves.”

Quartz: Donna Zuckerberg isn’t sure social media is a force for good

Quartz: Donna Zuckerberg isn’t sure social media is a force for good. “Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg tends to go on and on about how his company can make the world a more connected place. His sister Donna Zuckerberg, who recently wrote a book on red pill misogynists, doesn’t seem so convinced.”

University of Toronto: Who’s in control? U of T researcher examines why it’s so difficult to disconnect from social media

University of Toronto: Who’s in control? U of T researcher examines why it’s so difficult to disconnect from social media. “Academics have spent the last decade studying connectivity and social media – a trend that has more than two billion people around the world on Facebook and counting. For Tero Karppi, however, the focus has instead been disconnection… His new book, Disconnect: Facebook’s Affective Bonds, explores the challenges users face when they try to deactivate their Facebook accounts, and how efforts by social media companies to keep users logging in may be giving us less control over our digital lives.”

The Verge: A pioneering scientist explains ‘deep learning’

The Verge: A pioneering scientist explains ‘deep learning’. “Buzzwords like ‘deep learning’ and ‘neural networks’ are everywhere, but so much of the popular understanding is misguided, says Terrence Sejnowski, a computational neuroscientist at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies. Sejnowski, a pioneer in the study of learning algorithms, is the author of The Deep Learning Revolution (out next week from MIT Press). He argues that the hype about killer AI or robots making us obsolete ignores exciting possibilities happening in the fields of computer science and neuroscience, and what can happen when artificial intelligence meets human intelligence.”