The Verge: An economist explains what digital technology means for the future of popular culture

The Verge: An economist explains what digital technology means for the future of popular culture. “Pirating remains a problem, and traditional gatekeepers aren’t as powerful as they once were. But revenue for recorded music is growing, and there are more books, movies, television, and music than ever before. In his new book Digital Renaissance: What Data and Economics Tell Us about the Future of Popular Culture (Princeton University Press), [Joel] Waldfogel argues that digital technologies haven’t killed creative industries, but they have created a renaissance of new cultural products that consumers like and that wouldn’t have made created otherwise.”

Analytics India: 10 Free eBooks Beginners Should Read Before Diving Into Data Science

Analytics India: 10 Free eBooks Beginners Should Read Before Diving Into Data Science. “There is no dearth of books for Data Science which can help get one started and build a career in the field. But before you begin, getting a preliminary overview of these subjects is a wise and crucial thing to do. A healthy dose of eBooks on big data, data science and R programming is a great supplement for aspiring data scientists.”

SBS News: Database connects kids with culturally diverse children’s books

SBS News: Database connects kids with culturally diverse children’s books. “A new database designed by the National Centre for Australian Children’s Literacy (NCACL) hopes to make it easier for teachers, parents, and readers to find books which celebrate diversity. Users can search for key concepts in the database, including cultural identity, traditions, migration, and language.” The database will launch later in 2019.

Ars Technica: Book tells the inside story of how Reddit came to be the Internet’s “id”

Ars Technica: Book tells the inside story of how Reddit came to be the Internet’s “id”. “Entrepreneurs Alexis Ohanian and Steve Huffman famously founded Reddit as college roommates in 2005. Tech journalist Christine Lagorio-Chafkin’s recent book, We Are the Nerds: The Birth and Tumultuous Life of Reddit, the Internet’s Culture Laboratory, follows their sometimes rocky relationship as Reddit grew from a simple, user-directed front page for the Internet, to a scandal-rocked dominating force in online culture.”

ArchDaily: A Colorful Interactive Version of Euclid’s “Elements” Online for Free

Not sure how new this is, but looks like a gorgeous resource. ArchDaily: A Colorful Interactive Version of Euclid’s “Elements” Online for Free. “Written in 300BC, Euclid’s ‘Elements’ is a collection of 13 books containing definitions, propositions, and mathematical proofs, and is considered instrumental in the development of logic and modern science. With the advent of the printing press, many editions of the book have been shared through the centuries. One of the most famous is that of Oliver Byrne in 1847, an edition of the first six books that is set apart for its bold use of color to depict mathematical proofs, rather than using letters to label angles and shapes.”

Knowledge@Wharton: Why Books Matter for the Long Run

Knowledge@Wharton: Why Books Matter for the Long Run. “Why have Eric Schmidt, Meg Whitman, Reid Hoffman, John Doerr and other leading technologists resorted to the venerable (some would say backward) practice of book-writing to communicate their visions? Why did Mark Zuckerberg introduce a quaint book-of-the-month feature onto the runaway train of Facebook? Why does Bill Gates regularly pen long, thoughtful book reviews in a whirlwind communications culture fueled by texts and tweets? How have books survived the information tsunami, and what will authors and publishers have to do to leverage the success of books for the long run?”

Wired: Used Wisely, the Internet Can Actually Help Public Discourse

Wired: Used Wisely, the Internet Can Actually Help Public Discourse. “They saw it coming, the media theorists, book-bound intellectuals, Jesuit priests, classicists, and sociologists who attempted to make sense of what they called ‘electronic media,’ and we now think of as prehistoric radio and TV. With their long-winded tomes from an age of longer attention spans, authors like Marshall McLuhan, Harold Innis, Walter Ong, and others form a sort of prophetic canon that collectively catalogs our species’ first reaction to these newfangled contraptions, with their blinking lights and blaring speakers. Of course, they didn’t wholly foretell our present.”