Editor & Publisher: New RJI Project Seeks to Preserve Digital Archives

Editor & Publisher: New RJI Project Seeks to Preserve Digital Archives. “Fearful that future generations could lose historical recordings, footage, and stories, the Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute (RJI) and the University of Missouri (MU) Libraries are working together to ensure the survival of today’s digital news with the help of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and a $250,000 grant.”

Library of Congress: In a Web Archives Frame of Mind: Improving Access and Describing the Collections

Library of Congress: In a Web Archives Frame of Mind: Improving Access and Describing the Collections. “In 2018, the Library of Congress Web Archiving Team embarked on a journey to streamline description of the Library’s voluminous web archives. As part of that continuing effort, the Library of Congress Digital Content Management Section is excited to announce the release of 4,258 new web archives across 97 event and thematic collections!”

Make Tech Easier: How to Find Out When a Webpage Was Published

Make Tech Easier: How to Find Out When a Webpage Was Published. “When you’re doing research on a topic, it’s vital to ensure your sources are up to date. If you’re writing an academic paper, dates of publication are often required in the citations. The majority of the time, getting the date is easy: simply look on the site and find the ‘published on’ date to find how recent it was. Things get a little more complicated when there is no date listed on the webpage. When this happens, how do you know when the page was published?”

Introspective Digital Archaeology: The Digital Derangement of Archives

Introspective Digital Archaeology: The Digital Derangement of Archives. “So do digital archives represent a paradigm shift from traditional archives and archival practice, or are they simply a technological development of them?” Not lengthly, but dense and thought-provoking and well-written. Can you compare something to a slice of really good fruitcake without being pejorative?

NPR: Internet Historians Mourn Loss Of Cultural Record As Yahoo Prepares To Delete Groups

NPR: Internet Historians Mourn Loss Of Cultural Record As Yahoo Prepares To Delete Groups. “Yahoo Groups was once a place where people turned to find out what was happening in their communities. Then Facebook, Tumblr and other sites came along, making Yahoo Groups obsolete. So earlier this fall, Verizon, which now owns Yahoo, announced it will delete the archives of every Yahoo Group. That was supposed to happen this coming Saturday, but Verizon just announced it will extend the deadline until next month. NPR’s Neda Ulaby reports Internet historians and activists are scrambling.” I can’t find any other mentions of the deadline being extended at the moment, but I’ll keep an eye out. And why am I banging on about this? Because it’s going to happen again. And again. And again. And somebody has to care.

Ars Technica: Verizon reportedly blocks archivists from Yahoo Groups days before deletion

Ars Technica: Verizon reportedly blocks archivists from Yahoo Groups days before deletion. “An ad-hoc group scrambling to archive as much content as possible from Yahoo Groups ahead of the site’s final demise next week is running into trouble as more than a hundred volunteer archivists say Yahoo’s parent company, Verizon, has banned their accounts.” This is a big steaming pile of you know.

British Library: What is left behind? Exploring the Olympic Games legacies through the UK Web Archive

British Library: What is left behind? Exploring the Olympic Games legacies through the UK Web Archive. “The Olympic Games happen every four years. This means that every four years a city has to be chosen as a host city. It is easy to think about the impact of hosting such a big event in your own country. Usually governments have to prepare everything for their guests and be aware that the local population is expecting something that will remain as a legacy after the event ends. But what are people actually expecting? What usually happens after the Olympics? Are people happy or unhappy with the legacy left behind with the end of the games? We can try to answer these questions by reading what was published on the internet before, during and after the games in these countries that have hosted the Olympics.”