Forbes: Why We Need To Archive The Web In Order To Preserve Twitter

Forbes: Why We Need To Archive The Web In Order To Preserve Twitter. “As social media has become an ever-more central medium through which global society communicates, there has been considerable discussion about just how libraries and archives can work to preserve these walled gardens in the same way that web archives like the Internet Archive have worked to preserve the open web. Twitter in particular has been a keen focus of the social archiving community due to its streaming APIs and default public nature of most communications sent through the platform. Indeed, in 2010 the Library of Congress received a donation of the entire historical backfile of Twitter and continues to archive all public tweets through present day. Is this doomsday archive by itself truly sufficient to fully preserve Twitter for future generations?” Great article. Not particularly encouraging, but great.

Internet Archive: IMLS Grant to Advance Web Archiving in Public Libraries

Internet Archive: IMLS Grant to Advance Web Archiving in Public Libraries. “Working with partners from Queens Public Library, Cleveland Public Library, and San Francisco Public Library, and with OCLC’s WebJunction, which offers education and training to public libraries nationwide, the ‘Community Webs’ project will provide training, cohort support, and services, for a group of librarians at 15 different public libraries to develop expertise in creating collections of historically valuable web materials documenting their local communities. Project outputs will include over 30 terabytes of community history web archives and a suite of open educational resources, from guides to videos, for use by any librarian, archivist, or heritage professional working to preserve collections of local history comprised of online materials.”

Open Source: LinkArchiver automatically submits links to the Internet Archive

Open Source: LinkArchiver automatically submits links to the Internet Archive. “The internet is forever, except when it isn’t. “Link rot”—where once-valid links to websites become broken over time as pages move or sites go offline—is a real problem for people who try to do research online. The Internet Archive helps solve this problem by making submitted content available in the ‘Wayback Machine.’ The difficulty, of course, is getting people to remember to submit links for archival.”

JSTOR: Browser Tab Clutter Is the New Hoarding

JSTOR: Browser Tab Clutter Is the New Hoarding . ” Instead of a physical pile of diaries and scrapbooks, I have Facebook and Instagram. Instead of stocking up on craft supplies, I can order what I need when I need it—confident of next-day delivery. Actually, scratch that: with 3D printers getting cheaper and cheaper, I’m supposed to print what I need. It hasn’t worked out that way, however.”

University of Waterloo: Multidisciplinary project will help historians unlock billions of archived web pages

University of Waterloo: Multidisciplinary project will help historians unlock billions of archived web pages. “The University of Waterloo and York University have been awarded a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to make petabytes of historical internet content accessible to scholars and others interested in researching the recent past. The grant, valued at $610,625, supports Archives Unleashed, a project that will develop web archive search and data analysis tools to enable scholars and librarians to access, share, and investigate recent history since the early days of the World Wide Web. It is additionally supported by generous in-kind and financial contributions from Start Smart Labs, Compute Canada, York University Libraries and the University of Waterloo’s Faculty of Arts.”

Archive-It: K12 Web Archivists Capture History in the Making

Archive-It: K12 Web Archivists Capture History in the Making. “This year marked the 9th season of the K12 web archiving program. Students from 11 schools around the country worked together to think critically about information on the web and to select websites to archive for the future. Their collections are centered around topics that reflect their interests, their day-to-day lives, current events, and topics they studied in class. Each school incorporates web archiving into its curriculum differently. This year 3 teachers generously shared their experiences participating in the K12 Web Archiving program.”