Motherboard: Motherboard Made a Tool That Archives Websites on Demand

Motherboard: Motherboard Made a Tool That Archives Websites on Demand. “Archiving services, such as the Wayback Machine, may be a staple of online journalism, but they sometimes have a problem. While, say, Archive.is might preserve one particular webpage, perhaps the Wayback Machine can’t, depending on what sort of restrictions the website developer has put in place. For example, someone stopped copies of MSNBC host Joy Reid’s blog, which hosted a stream of homophobic comments, from displaying in the Wayback Machine. With that in mind, I made a quick tool that can push a single webpage or URL to multiple archiving sites at once, and fire back the newly minted digital copies in response. Hopefully it will help reporters and researchers more efficiently figure out which service will work best for that particular site.”

Engadget: Researchers digitize writing with cheap, touch-sensitive paper

Engadget: Researchers digitize writing with cheap, touch-sensitive paper. “Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have developed a paper that can track touch, which, among other applications, could lead to an inexpensive way to digitize writing. They’re presenting their work this week at the ACM CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems.”

Sunlight Foundation: In website reshuffle, federal committee makes reports on collecting sexual orientation and gender identity data inaccessible

Sunlight Foundation: In website reshuffle, federal committee makes reports on collecting sexual orientation and gender identity data inaccessible . “If you visit the website for the Federal Committee on Statistical Methodology (FCSM), you’ll find that many of the links for reports lead to dead pages or PDFs that say, ‘this page is currently under construction.’ Among the inaccessible resources are statistical policy working papers, as well as reports pertaining to collecting data on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity (SOGI), which were live on a previous version of the site. Also gone is the FedStats website, which currently redirects to the FCSM homepage. FedStats, which claimed to be ‘a trusted source for federal statistical information since 1997,’ was quietly sunset in February 2018, removing troves of aggregated links to statistical policy documents and statistics websites along with it.”

Internet Archive: 27 Public Libraries and the Internet Archive Launch “Community Webs” for Local History Web Archiving

Internet Archive: 27 Public Libraries and the Internet Archive Launch “Community Webs” for Local History Web Archiving. “With generous support from the Institute of Museum and Library Services, as well as the Kahle/Austin Foundation and the Archive-It service, the Internet Archive and 27 public library partners representing 17 different states have launched a new program: Community Webs: Empowering Public Libraries to Create Community History Web Archives. The program will provide education, applied training, cohort network development, and web archiving services for a group of public librarians to develop expertise in web archiving for the purpose of local memory collecting…. The program will result in dozens of terabytes of public library administered local history web archives, a range of open educational resources in the form of online courses, videos, and guides, and a nationwide network of public librarians with expertise in local history web archiving and the advocacy tools to build and expand the network. “

Bellingcat: How to Archive Open Source Materials

Bellingcat: How to Archive Open Source Materials. “There are two main reasons to archive all of the digital evidence that you use an investigation: to preserve it in case it is removed from its original source, and to prove to your audience that the material (if it has been removed) really existed as you present it. Screenshots can be easily forged, so it is vital that you find a way to retain the materials in a way that shows that you did not have the opportunity to modify the content.”

Columbia Journalism Review: Erasing history

Columbia Journalism Review: Erasing history. “In the 21st century, more and more information is ‘born digital’ and will stay that way, prone to decay or disappearance as servers, software, Web technologies, and computer languages break down. The task of internet archivists has developed a significance far beyond what anyone could have imagined in 2001, when the Internet Archive first cranked up the Wayback Machine and began collecting Web pages; the site now holds more than 30 petabytes of data dating back to 1996. (One gigabyte would hold the equivalent of 30 feet of books on a shelf; a petabyte is a million of those.) Not infrequently, the Wayback Machine and other large digital archives, such as those in the care of the great national and academic libraries, find themselves holding the only extant copy of a given work on the public internet. This responsibility is increasingly fraught with political, cultural, and even legal complications.”

Archiving Tweets: Are You Missing the Moment? (CogDogBlog)

CogDogBlog: Archiving Tweets: Are You Missing the Moment?. “When storify announced it was biting the dust/pooping the web, amongst the rush to jump to some other hosted platform or use my arcane tool, what I noticed was about 90% of the ways people talked about storify was solely archiving tweets. I always saw Storify as more than a bag of tweets (it was among the 50+ Ways to Tell a Story examples)… but if that is all you are doing, why not just use Twitter Moments?”