Internet Archive: Internet Archive, Code for Science and Society, and California Digital Library to Partner on a Data Sharing and Preservation Pilot Project

Internet Archive: Internet Archive, Code for Science and Society, and California Digital Library to Partner on a Data Sharing and Preservation Pilot Project. “Research and cultural heritage institutions are facing increasing costs to provide long-term public access to historically valuable collections of scientific data, born-digital records, and other digital artifacts. With many institutions moving data to cloud services, data sharing and access costs have become more complex. As leading institutions in decentralization and data preservation, the Internet Archive (IA), Code for Science & Society (CSS) and California Digital Library (CDL) will work together on a proof-of-concept pilot project to demonstrate how decentralized technology could bolster existing institutional infrastructure and provide new tools for efficient data management and preservation.”

Born Digital: How Social Media and Paperless Offices are Reshaping the University Archives (Princeton Alumni Weekly)

Princeton Alumni Weekly: Born Digital: How Social Media and Paperless Offices are Reshaping the University Archives. “The artifacts of activism at Princeton come in many forms: membership cards for the Veterans of Future Wars, a satirical student group that made national headlines in 1936; audio cassettes from WPRB’s coverage of a campus meeting at Jadwin Gym during the May 1970 strike that followed the U.S. invasion of Cambodia; and scores of photos, mostly black-and-white, from public demonstrations such as the 1978 occupation of Nassau Hall, when students protested University investments in companies doing business in apartheid-era South Africa. During the 2015 Nassau Hall sit-in — the protest that sparked a re-examination of Woodrow Wilson 1879’s legacy and a broader discussion of diversity and inclusion at Princeton — archivists knew they would need to take a different approach, one not dependent on file boxes.”

Researcher Access to Born-Digital Collections: an Exploratory Study (Journal of Contemporary Archival Studies)

Journal of Contemporary Archival Studies: Researcher Access to Born-Digital Collections: an Exploratory Study. “While a small, but growing number of institutions offer access to born-digital collections, there is scant literature documenting researcher interaction with these materials. This paper addresses this gap through documenting and analyzing researcher interactions to portions of born-digital collections at New York University (NYU) Libraries, with the cooperation of NYU’s Fales Library and Special Collection and the Digital Library and Technology Solutions Department, as well as the National Digital Stewardship Residency (NDSR) program.”

Columbia Journalism Review: Digital journalism’s disappearing public record, and what to do about it

Columbia Journalism Review: Digital journalism’s disappearing public record, and what to do about it. “Institutions from banks to hospitals struggle with digital record-keeping now that much of the information that used to live on paper exists primarily in digital form. News organizations find it particularly challenging to keep the proverbial first draft of history from vanishing, and to figure out how to keep that draft continuously available to readers. It’s an area in which tech companies and newsrooms need to find common ground, and soon. ‘Publishers aren’t doing archiving,’ says Mark Graham, director of the Wayback Machine, a tool developed by the Internet Archive for preserving Web content. ‘Archiving is simply not a business priority.'”

BusinessCloud: Public Can Now Search [UK] Government’s Entire Digital Archive

BusinessCloud: Public Can Now Search Government’s Entire Digital Archive. “The British government’s entire online presence comprising billions of web pages has been indexed and digitally archived to the cloud for the first time. Manchester tech firm MirrorWeb has devised an all-new indexing to create an accessible, searchable and user-friendly resource for the public. The National Archives’ gigantic 120TB web archive encompasses billions of web pages – from every government department website and social media account – from 1996 to the present.”

OpenGov: How the National Library of Australia is preparing for the digital age

OpenGov: How the National Library of Australia is preparing for the digital age. “OpenGov caught up with David Wong, Assistant Director-General of Information Technology and CIO at the National Library of Australia, to learn about the final stages of the program to replace the digital library infrastructure, and how the Library is building on the foundations laid by the program.”

Motherboard: Motherboard Made a Tool That Archives Websites on Demand

Motherboard: Motherboard Made a Tool That Archives Websites on Demand. “Archiving services, such as the Wayback Machine, may be a staple of online journalism, but they sometimes have a problem. While, say, Archive.is might preserve one particular webpage, perhaps the Wayback Machine can’t, depending on what sort of restrictions the website developer has put in place. For example, someone stopped copies of MSNBC host Joy Reid’s blog, which hosted a stream of homophobic comments, from displaying in the Wayback Machine. With that in mind, I made a quick tool that can push a single webpage or URL to multiple archiving sites at once, and fire back the newly minted digital copies in response. Hopefully it will help reporters and researchers more efficiently figure out which service will work best for that particular site.”