The Elephant In The Room: Artificial Intelligence Used To Process Governor Tim Kaine’s E-Mails (Virginia Memory)

Virginia Memory: The Elephant In The Room: Artificial Intelligence Used To Process Governor Tim Kaine’s E-Mails. “How do you eat an elephant? One bite at a time. For the past seven years, that’s how we’ve been tackling the task of processing the 1.5 million e-mails transferred to the Library of Virginia in 2010 as part of the electronic records of outgoing Governor Tim Kaine. When Kaine announced his candidacy for the U.S. Senate in 2011, the Library challenged itself to make the Kaine administration’s e-mail records available for research in time for the 2012 election. What did that entail? Basically, we had to figure out how to separate whatever portion of those 1.5 million e-mails shouldn’t be included in our online collection—either because they aren’t records of enduring value (think e-mails announcing doughnuts in the break room) or because they contain sensitive materials such as attorney-client privileged communications, privacy-protected information, or operational security details.”

State Archives of North Carolina: $1.1M grant from Mellon Foundation will facilitate advances in email curation

State Archives of North Carolina: $1.1M grant from Mellon Foundation will facilitate advances in email curation . “The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has received a grant for $1.1 million from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation for a project to develop a toolset that will enable institutions to more quickly and efficiently process emails included in born-digital collections. The UNC School of Information and Library Science (SILS) is partnering with the State Archives of North Carolina under the NC Department of Natural and Cultural Resources (NC DNCR) for the two-year project, which will launch in January. The Review, Appraisal, and Triage of Mail (RATOM) project’s goals are particularly significant for organizations, including libraries, archives and museums (LAMs), that need to provide public access to records while protecting private information.”

KTVA: Anchorage Museum archiving memes, social media posts from earthquake

KTVA: Anchorage Museum archiving memes, social media posts from earthquake. “The 1964 earthquake was documented in newspaper headlines, letters and photographs shot on film. After the Nov. 30 quake, historians are using words and images from social media to document the disaster. Aaron Leggett, a curator with the Anchorage Museum, said staff started collecting online items for their archive an hour after the quake hit.”

The Next Web: Reddit’s data hoarders are frantically trying to save Tumblr’s NSFW content

The Next Web: Reddit’s data hoarders are frantically trying to save Tumblr’s NSFW content. “By Wednesday afternoon, just two days after the announcement, a group was already hard at work attempting to archive the whole damn thing, or, most of it anyway. Redditor u/itdnhr began the process, collecting some 67,000 NSFW Tumblr accounts and compiling a massive list. He then shared it with r/Datasets, where other redditors stripped the non-working accounts, leaving 43,000 accounts. Preserving Tumblr‘s NSFW accounts, though, isn’t without its challenges, both in scope and legality.”

Straits Times: NLB archiving Singapore websites, digital materials

Straits Times: NLB archiving Singapore websites, digital materials. “The National Library Board (NLB) has taken on the enormous task of archiving 180,000 Singapore websites ending with the .sg domain, as well as digital materials published in Singapore. The annually updated National Day Parade website and the Fighting SARS Together! website launched during the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome outbreak in 2003 are among the 2,000 websites that have been archived so far.”

Route Fifty: Digital Record Deluge Threatens to Swamp States

Route Fifty: Digital Record Deluge Threatens to Swamp States. “The dramatic growth in digital records produced by state agencies presents significant challenges as archivists seek to preserve the ongoing stream of information for the historical record. There has been a staggering 1,693 percent growth in state and territorial electronic records between 2006 and 2016, according to a new report from national organizations representing state CIOs and archivists. Despite the rapid growth, states’ average spending on archive and records management is just .007 percent of their annual budgets.”

Norway’s petabyte plan: Store everything ever published in a 1,000-year archive (ZDNet)

ZDNet: Norway’s petabyte plan: Store everything ever published in a 1,000-year archive. “In the far north of Norway, near the Arctic Circle, experts at the National Library of Norway’s (NLN) secure storage facility are in the process of implementing an astonishing plan. They aim to digitize everything ever published in Norway: books, newspapers, manuscripts, posters, photos, movies, broadcasts, and maps, as well as all websites on the Norwegian .no domain.”