Editor & Publisher: New RJI Project Seeks to Preserve Digital Archives

Editor & Publisher: New RJI Project Seeks to Preserve Digital Archives. “Fearful that future generations could lose historical recordings, footage, and stories, the Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute (RJI) and the University of Missouri (MU) Libraries are working together to ensure the survival of today’s digital news with the help of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and a $250,000 grant.”

Library of Congress: In a Web Archives Frame of Mind: Improving Access and Describing the Collections

Library of Congress: In a Web Archives Frame of Mind: Improving Access and Describing the Collections. “In 2018, the Library of Congress Web Archiving Team embarked on a journey to streamline description of the Library’s voluminous web archives. As part of that continuing effort, the Library of Congress Digital Content Management Section is excited to announce the release of 4,258 new web archives across 97 event and thematic collections!”

Make Tech Easier: How to Find Out When a Webpage Was Published

Make Tech Easier: How to Find Out When a Webpage Was Published. “When you’re doing research on a topic, it’s vital to ensure your sources are up to date. If you’re writing an academic paper, dates of publication are often required in the citations. The majority of the time, getting the date is easy: simply look on the site and find the ‘published on’ date to find how recent it was. Things get a little more complicated when there is no date listed on the webpage. When this happens, how do you know when the page was published?”

Ars Technica: Verizon reportedly blocks archivists from Yahoo Groups days before deletion

Ars Technica: Verizon reportedly blocks archivists from Yahoo Groups days before deletion. “An ad-hoc group scrambling to archive as much content as possible from Yahoo Groups ahead of the site’s final demise next week is running into trouble as more than a hundred volunteer archivists say Yahoo’s parent company, Verizon, has banned their accounts.” This is a big steaming pile of you know.

Boing Boing: GIF site Gfycat announces mass deletions, threatens Archive Team with lawsuit

Boing Boing: GIF site Gfycat announces mass deletions, threatens Archive Team with lawsuit. “Gfycat is a site that people upload GIFs to so they can share them with other people reliably. Used most conspicuously to host memes, clips from other media, and animated porn, it announced Wednesday that it was planning to permanently delete old, anonymously-posted images within days. Archive Team, a web preservation initiative coordinated by Jason Scott, set about archiving the site’s soon-to-vanish content. So Gfycat’s CEO, Dan McEleney, threatened it with a lawsuit, describing archival of the memes it hosts as a ‘denial of service attack’ and demanding compensation.”

Reddit: Help us save as many Yahoo! Groups as possible!

Reddit: Help us save as many Yahoo! Groups as possible!. “We need volunteers to manually join as many groups as they can, by filling out reCaptchas. We’ve written a Chrome extension that links to a tracker to coordinate efforts. If you’re up for completing a bunch of reCaptcha’s for us, you could really make a difference! If everyone reading this just completed a few, it would be an enormous help!”

The Wayback Machine: Fighting Digital Extinction in New Ways (Internet Archive)

Internet Archive: The Wayback Machine: Fighting Digital Extinction in New Ways. “The average web page might last three months before it’s altered or deleted forever. You never know when access to the information on these web pages is going to be needed. It might be three months from now; it might be three decades. That’s how the Wayback Machine serves—making history by saving history. Now, the Wayback Machine is fighting digital extinction in brand new ways.”

Library of Congress, The Signal: Launching the Digital Collections Management Compendium

Library of Congress, The Signal: Launching the Digital Collections Management Compendium. “Over the past two years, my colleagues and I in the Digital Content Management section have been working with experts from across many divisions of the Library of Congress to collate and assemble guidance and policy that guide or reflect the practices that the Library uses to manage digital collections. I am excited to share that today the results of that work have launched as the Digital Collections Management Compendium (DCMC).”

National Library of New Zealand: Is your Facebook account an archive of the future?

National Library of New Zealand: Is your Facebook account an archive of the future?. “Over the next few months, we’re inviting New Zealanders to donate their Facebook archives to the Alexander Turnbull Library. In collecting personal Facebook archives of New Zealanders here and abroad, we will be continuing the work that has always been part of our mission: documenting the lives of New Zealanders today to support the emerging and anticipated research needs of the future.”

The Journal of Interactive Technology and Pedagogy: What Do You Do with 11,000 Blogs? Preserving, Archiving, and Maintaining UMW Blogs—A Case Study

The Journal of Interactive Technology and Pedagogy: What Do You Do with 11,000 Blogs? Preserving, Archiving, and Maintaining UMW Blogs—A Case Study. “After three years in which Division of Teaching and Learning Technologies (DTLT) staff and a few UMW faculty experimented with blogs in and out of the classroom (Campbell 2009, 20), UMW Blogs launched in 2007. It provided the campus with a WordPress installation that allowed any student, faculty, or staff member to get their own subdomain (e.g. mygreatblog.umwblogs.org) and WordPress site, administered by DTLT. Since then, the 600 blogs of 2007 has grown to over 11,000 blogs and 13,000 users as of 2018! Each site has any number of themes, plugins, and widgets installed and running, creating a database that is exponentially larger and more cumbersome than the user numbers suggest at first glance.”

BBC Future: Why there’s so little left of the early internet

BBC Future: Why there’s so little left of the early internet. “The Million Dollar Homepage shows that the decay of this early period of the internet is almost invisible. In the offline world, the closing of, say, a local newspaper is often widely reported. But online sites die, often without fanfare, and the first inkling you may have that they are no longer there is when you click on a link to be met with a blank page.”

Computerworld: National Library launches ‘enormous’ archive of Australia’s Internet

Computerworld: National Library launches ‘enormous’ archive of Australia’s Internet. “‘The Australian Web Archive [AWA] is one of the biggest in the world. And when we say big, we mean enormous,’ says director general of the National Library of Australia, Dr Marie-Louise Ayres. The new archive, which launched last week, contains around 600 terabytes of data across 9 billion records. In bookshelf terms; if the records were printed and stacked they would stretch from Canberra to Cairns.”