Business Insider: A new algorithm could catch social-media trolls as they try to influence US elections. Researchers are offering it for free.

Business Insider: A new algorithm could catch social-media trolls as they try to influence US elections. Researchers are offering it for free.. “The tool, described in a study published Wednesday in the journal Science Advances, works by learning to recognize known, common patterns associated with troll activity and disinformation campaigns. Russian troll accounts, for instance, have posted many links to far-right websites, but the content on those sites didn’t always match the posts’ accompanying text or images. Venezuelan trolls, meanwhile, have often posted fake websites.”

EurekAlert: Who’s a bot and who’s not

EurekAlert: Who’s a bot and who’s not. “A new study in Frontiers in Physics has revealed the presence of short-term behavioral trends in humans that are absent in social media bots, providing an example of a ‘human signature’ on social media which could be leveraged to develop more sophisticated bot detection strategies. The research is the first study of its kind to apply user behavior over a social media session to the problem of bot detection.”

MakeUseOf: Google’s ReCAPTCHAs Also Capture Your Private Information

MakeUseOf: Google’s ReCAPTCHAs Also Capture Your Private Information. “Interesting fact: you actually rarely encounter an original CAPTCHA. They’ve largely been supplanted by reCAPTCHAs, a system owned by search engine giant, Google. And in an effort to stop spambots, reCAPTCHAs have evolved so much, they’re now a threat to your privacy.”

The Conversation: You can join the effort to expose Twitter bots

The Conversation: You can join the effort to expose Twitter bots. “In the lead-up to the 2018 midterm elections, more than 10,000 automated Twitter accounts got caught conducting a coordinated campaign of tweets to discourage people from voting. These automated accounts may seem authentic to some, but a tool called Botometer was able to identify them while they pretentiously argued and agreed, for example, that ‘democratic men who vote drown out the voice of women.’ We are part of the team that developed this tool that detects the bot accounts on social media. Our next effort, called BotSlayer, is aimed at helping journalists and the general public spot these automated social media campaigns while they are happening.”

Lifehacker: Automatically Detect Computer Generated Text With This Chrome Extension

Lifehacker: Automatically Detect Computer Generated Text With This Chrome Extension. “Artificial intelligence systems can write pretty convincingly readable text these days. A new browser extension, GPTrue or False, can test whether a given text is likely to have been generated by an AI.” Janelle Shane, an AI expert whom I’ve mentioned in RB more than once, tested it and thought it worked pretty good.

CNET: Memes could be our secret weapon against pesky bots

CNET: Memes could be our secret weapon against pesky bots. “Researchers from the University of Delaware published a study online last month suggesting memes can be effectively used to tell humans and bots apart. They propose memes could be ‘one of the strongest techniques to distinguish between a human and a bot based on conscience and interpretation.'”

ScienceBlog: Clickbait Secrets Exposed! Humans And AI Team Up To Improve Clickbait Detection

ScienceBlog: Clickbait Secrets Exposed! Humans And AI Team Up To Improve Clickbait Detection. “Humans and machines worked together to help train an artificial intelligence — AI — model that outperformed other clickbait detectors, according to researchers at Penn State and Arizona State University. In addition, the new AI-based solution was also able to tell the difference between clickbait headlines that were generated by machines — or bots — and ones written by people, they said.”

The Intercept: Hackers Are So Fed Up With Twitter Bots They’re Hunting Them Down Themselves

The Intercept: Hackers Are So Fed Up With Twitter Bots They’re Hunting Them Down Themselves. “Even if Twitter hasn’t invested much in anti-bot software, some of its most technically proficient users have. They’re writing and refining code that can use Twitter’s public application programming interface, or API, as well as Google and other online interfaces, to ferret out fake accounts and bad actors. The effort, at least among the researchers I spoke with, has begun with hunting bots designed to promote pornographic material — a type of fake account that is particularly easy to spot — but the plan is to eventually broaden the hunt to other types of bots. The bot-hunting programming and research has been a strictly volunteer, part-time endeavor, but the efforts have collectively identified tens of thousands of fake accounts, underlining just how much low-hanging fruit remains for Twitter to prune.”