“The brain is just so amazing:” New Instagram video series explains neuroscience (Stanford Medicine)

Stanford Medicine: “The brain is just so amazing:” New Instagram video series explains neuroscience. “Many people make New Year’s resolutions to exercise more or eat healthier. Not Stanford neurobiology professor Andrew Huberman, PhD. This year, he set out to educate the public about exciting discoveries in neuroscience using Instagram. Huberman’s sights are high: he pledged to post on Instagram one-minute educational videos about neuroscience an average of five times per week for an entire year. I recently spoke with him to see how he’s doing on his resolution.”

EurekAlert: Blue Brain Project releases first-ever digital 3D brain cell atlas

EurekAlert: Blue Brain Project releases first-ever digital 3D brain cell atlas . “The first digital 3D atlas of every cell in the mouse brain provides neuroscientists with previously unavailable information on major cell types, numbers and positions in all 737 brain regions — which will potentially accelerate progress in brain science massively.”

Firstpost: Researchers Make A Massive Map Of Changes That Our Brain Undergoes As An Infant

Firstpost: Researchers Make A Massive Map Of Changes That Our Brain Undergoes As An Infant. “Researchers from the St Jude’s Childrens’ Hospital have compiled a huge database with the many genetic changes that brain cells undergo as an embryo, and in the months immediately following birth.The findings from the study were published on 14 September in the journal Current Biology.The researchers isolated thousands of brain cells from a mouse model for the study.”

NBC News: I stopped Googling everything, and this is what happened to my brain

NBC News: I stopped Googling everything, and this is what happened to my brain. “You’re talking about movies with friends and there’s this film you must tell them about. What was it called, that one about the thing, you know, with that actor, what’s his name? You grab your phone, get your answer and conversation proceeds uninterrupted. You solved the puzzle and all is well. But what about your brain? Is constantly feeding it the right answer —with your phone being a bottomless Pez dispenser of factoids — making it lazy? Does it eventually atrophy? Who needs an internal memory when we’ve got Siri?”

Allen Institute for Brain Science: Allen Institute for Brain Science Database Release Nearly Doubles Mouse Brain Cell Data

Allen Institute for Brain Science: Allen Institute for Brain Science Database Release Nearly Doubles Mouse Brain Cell Data. “The Allen Institute for Brain Science today announced the release of new data, tools to analyze those data and a new web-based 3D viewer to explore anatomy and connections in the mouse brain, the Allen Brain Explorer. Today’s data release almost doubles the number of mouse cells in the Allen Cell Types Database – raising the number included from just over 1,000 to slightly more than 1,900 cells – as well as adding new neuronal connectivity information to the Allen Mouse Brain Connectivity Atlas and adding more single-cell transcriptomics data from mouse, human and macaque brain cells.”

UC San Diego: Scientists Construct Google-Earth-like Atlas of the Human Brain

UC San Diego: Scientists Construct Google-Earth-like Atlas of the Human Brain. “The researchers said their ultimate goal is to construct an online surface-based atlas containing layered maps of multiple modalities that can be used as a guide map to understand the topological organization, functions, and disorders of the human brain. This online atlas will be constructed for searching and browsing brain areas and functions, they said, include interactive multi-layer features similar to ‘Google Earth.'”

The Bulletin: Researchers explore how activities affect brain development in kids

The Bulletin: Researchers explore how activities affect brain development in kids. “Parents wondering how video games, athletic pursuits or sleeping habits may affect their kids’ brains may get some answers thanks to a massive effort underway at 21 institutions across the country. Researchers are recruiting 11,500 kids aged 9 or 10 to participate in the largest study of its kind on the effects — good and bad — of myriad activities on adolescent brain development. They plan to create a giant new database available to researchers everywhere that could inform everything from public policy to education to parenting.”