UC San Diego: Scientists Construct Google-Earth-like Atlas of the Human Brain

UC San Diego: Scientists Construct Google-Earth-like Atlas of the Human Brain. “The researchers said their ultimate goal is to construct an online surface-based atlas containing layered maps of multiple modalities that can be used as a guide map to understand the topological organization, functions, and disorders of the human brain. This online atlas will be constructed for searching and browsing brain areas and functions, they said, include interactive multi-layer features similar to ‘Google Earth.'”

The Bulletin: Researchers explore how activities affect brain development in kids

The Bulletin: Researchers explore how activities affect brain development in kids. “Parents wondering how video games, athletic pursuits or sleeping habits may affect their kids’ brains may get some answers thanks to a massive effort underway at 21 institutions across the country. Researchers are recruiting 11,500 kids aged 9 or 10 to participate in the largest study of its kind on the effects — good and bad — of myriad activities on adolescent brain development. They plan to create a giant new database available to researchers everywhere that could inform everything from public policy to education to parenting.”

University of Southern California: Shared database of brain images aims to boost stroke patients’ recovery

University of Southern California: Shared database of brain images aims to boost stroke patients’ recovery. “A USC-led team has archived and shared hundreds of brain scans from stroke patients, which researchers hope will help to forecast which patients will respond to a variety of rehabilitation therapies. The study of the data set, known as Anatomical Tracings of Lesion After Stroke (ATLAS), was published in Scientific Data, a Nature journal.”

National Institutes of Health: NIH releases first dataset from unprecedented study of adolescent brain development

National Institutes of Health: NIH releases first dataset from unprecedented study of adolescent brain development. “The National Institutes of Health Tuesday released to the scientific community an unparalleled dataset from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) study. To date, more than 7,500 youth and their families have been recruited for the study, well over half the participant goal. Approximately 30 terabytes of data (about three times the size of the Library of Congress collection), obtained from the first 4,500 participants, will be available to scientists worldwide to conduct research on the many factors that influence brain, cognitive, social, and emotional development.”

CBC News: Scientists build better search engine by mimicking fruit fly brain

CBC News: Scientists build better search engine by mimicking fruit fly brain. “Sometimes nature knows best — and that’s particularly true for search engines. Nothing can beat the brain for its search engine, not even Google. And scientists are now designing search engines of the future with the brain in mind — the fly brain in fact.”

PR Newswire: Allen Institute Shares First Open Database Of Live Human Brain Cells (PRESS RELEASE)

PR Newswire: Allen Institute Shares First Open Database Of Live Human Brain Cells (PRESS RELEASE). “The Allen Institute for Brain Science has added the first data from human nerve cells to the Allen Cell Types Database: a publicly available tool for researchers to explore and understand the building blocks of the human brain. This first release includes electrical properties from approximately 300 living cortical neurons of different types derived from 36 patients, with accompanying 3D reconstructions of their shape or anatomy for 100 cells, and computer models simulating the electrical behavior of these neurons. The database will also contain gene expression profiles, based on measurements of all genes used by 16,000 individual cells, from three adult human brains.”

Deutsche Welle: German research organization to identify Nazi victims that ended up as brain slides

Deutsche Welle: German research organization to identify Nazi victims that ended up as brain slides. “The Nazis murdered about 300,000 people with mental illnesses. Some of the victims’ brains were handed over for research, and some are still held at German institutes. It’s time to identify the victims…. The researchers will try to identify the remains so that they can be properly buried. They sift through books and archives at the Max Planck institutes, as well as at hospitals and psychiatric wards, and the archives of any offices associated with the Nazi euthanasia program. They will collect all data in a new database, Czech says.”