Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: Some women extend breastfeeding to get COVID antibodies into their babies

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: Some women extend breastfeeding to get COVID antibodies into their babies. “At just 19 months old, Ashley Bournias’ son, Theodore, is too young to receive any of the COVID vaccines. But Ms. Bournias has found a way to give him some protection against the virus: through antibodies in her breast milk…. Ms. Bournias, of McCandless, is part of a group of women sometimes referred to as long-haul breastfeeders, who are continuing to breastfeed longer than they had planned, in order to protect their toddlers from COVID-19.”

Newswise: Study: No Serious COVID-19 Vaccine Side Effects in Breastfeeding Moms, Infants

Newswise: Study: No Serious COVID-19 Vaccine Side Effects in Breastfeeding Moms, Infants. “In a recent study, published in the online edition of Breastfeeding Medicine, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine found that breastfeeding mothers who received either the Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna vaccination reported the same local or systemic symptoms as what has been previously reported in non-breastfeeding women, with no serious side effects in the breastfed infants.”

Penn State News: Twitter data unveils issues nursing mothers face, informs proposed interventions

Penn State News: Twitter data unveils issues nursing mothers face, informs proposed interventions. “Social media has become a platform for new mothers to openly share their experiences of the joys and challenges of parenthood. Researchers at Penn State and Dalhousie University have unraveled the sentiments in nursing mothers’ tweets to better understand the factors influencing breastfeeding behaviors. They hope the findings can inform policies and interventions to support and improve resources for nursing mothers, such as breastfeeding support, workplace accommodations and technological aids such as apps.”

The BayNet: Southern Maryland Engineers Hope to Solve Ventilator Shortage With Breast Pumps

The BayNet: Southern Maryland Engineers Hope to Solve Ventilator Shortage With Breast Pumps. ” There are a lot of moms that still have them sitting around. Maybe stuffed in a drawer, maybe in a random bedroom closet, or maybe just tucked away with the rest of that old diaper bag you used before your baby grew up. Of course, we are talking about those old breast pumps that sit around collecting dust after you no longer need them. But this team of engineers from Southern Maryland hopes they found a new use for those pumps. In the midst of a global health pandemic caused by the novel coronavirus(COVID-19), their ingenuity could potentially save thousands of lives that will be impacted by a shortage of ventilators across the country.”

EurekAlert: Apps help with breastfeeding — at a cost

EurekAlert: Apps help with breastfeeding — at a cost. “The objective approach of most infant feeding (IF) apps gives mothers a perception of greater control, confidence and efficiency at a time of transition and stress in the early stages of parenting an infant, the study found. However, with more than 100 such apps available, the mobile content can also present new mums with another set of potential worries, including feeling overwhelmed by the information, concerns about over-reliance on the app, and even questioning the app’s advice.”

Twitch: Twitch is okay with breastfeeding — but many viewers aren’t, and that’s a problem

The Next Web: Twitch is okay with breastfeeding — but many viewers aren’t, and that’s a problem. “A Twitch streamer apparently started a revolution when she began breastfeeding her child on stream. When a clip of her doing so was deleted, she protested to Twitch. Site support eventually revealed the issue was that no one had, up to now, actually set policy on breastfeeding — but they did decree that it’s allowed.”

University of Alabama at Birmingham: Pro-breastfeeding communities empower new moms

University of Alabama at Birmingham: Pro-breastfeeding communities empower new moms. “Social media can positively influence breastfeeding related attitudes, knowledge and behavior, according to a new study from the University of Alabama at Birmingham. Breastfeeding support groups on social media create a sense of community for new moms to share experiences and support each other in the breastfeeding practice and could be considered pillars of support for new moms.”