Reuters: Britain to tackle ‘Wild West’ internet with new laws

Reuters: Britain to tackle ‘Wild West’ internet with new laws. “Britain will tackle ‘the Wild West elements’ on the internet from cyberbullying to online child exploitation by introducing new laws for social media companies, digital minister Matt Hancock said on Sunday.”

‘Dirty money’: U-turn as Tories back plans to make tax havens transparent (The Guardian)

The Guardian:
‘Dirty money’: U-turn as Tories back plans to make tax havens transparent
. “Britain’s overseas territories will be forced to adopt public registers of company ownership at the end of the decade after the government conceded it would have to support a backbench amendment designed to stem the global flow of ‘dirty money’.”

Analyzing Changes to British Populations In the 19th and Early 20th Centuries

Now available: Populations Past, a map and analysis of Victorian and Edwardian population. From the about page: “The second half of the nineteenth century was a period of major change in the dynamics of the British population. This was a time of transformation from a relatively ‘high pressure’ demographic regime characterised by medium to high birth and death rates to a ‘low pressure’ regime of low birth and death rates, a transformation known as the ‘demographic transition’. This transition was not uniform across England and Wales: certain places and social groups appear to have led the declines while others lagged behind. Exploring these geographical patterns can provide insights into the process of change and the influence of economic and geographical factors. This website allows users to create and view maps of different demographic measures and related socio-economic indicators every 10 years between 1851 and 1911. These include fertility, childhood mortality, marriage, migration status, household compositions, age-structure, occupational status and population density. Brief explanations of each measure are included, indicating how they are calculated and explaining how they relate to other measures.”

American Folklife Center: AFC’s James Madison Carpenter Collection Is Online

American Folklife Center: AFC’s James Madison Carpenter Collection Is Online. “The collection itself was the work of James Madison Carpenter, a Harvard-trained scholar who gathered more than 3,000 traditional songs and 300 folk plays, as well as fiddle tunes, folk customs, children’s games, and traditional tales. He collected most of them in Britain between 1928 and 1935, with a smaller number coming from the USA, between 1927 and 1943…. He spent time in local communities recording traditional ballads, ‘bothy songs,’ seasonal carols, sea shanties, and more. Unlike earlier collectors, he made sound recordings of some of his contributors on wax cylinders, including some performers whose songs and tunes had previously been notated only by hand.”

Now online: Never-before seen footage of 1900s Jewish Britain (Times of Israel)

Times of Israel: Now online: Never-before seen footage of 1900s Jewish Britain. “The images tumble from the screen, in glorious Technicolor or flickering black-and-white. The quality is highly variable and so is the subject matter, ranging from the utterly banal to the high-flown. And yet, there is a connecting thread — the celebration of ‘Jewish Britain on Film,’ a collection which has just been released by the British Film Archive. And, curator Simon McCallum explains, this is part of a much bigger project– ‘Britain on Film’ — where researchers are attempting to digitize more than 10,000 titles.”

Manchester Evening News: The grisly history of Britain’s biggest and worst World War Two internment camp

Manchester Evening News: The grisly history of Britain’s biggest and worst World War Two internment camp. “An old cotton mill hides a shameful, little-known secret. Now part of an industrial estate, the brick buildings have changed little over the years. A passer-by might never know the suffering endured there After the outbreak of the Second World War, the mill became a grim, spartan internment camp for thousands of innocent Italian, Austrians and German Jews who had fled the fear of Nazi death camps for new lives in Britain. All men – they were wrongly branded ‘enemy aliens’ as wartime national security was blurred with paranoia and suspicion.”

The Guardian: UK government considers classifying Google and Facebook as publishers

The Guardian: UK government considers classifying Google and Facebook as publishers. “Karen Bradley, the culture secretary, has said the government is considering changing the legal status of Google, Facebook and other internet companies amid growing concerns about copyright infringement and the spread of extremist material online. The internet groups are considered conduits of information rather than publishers under UK law, meaning they have limited responsibility for what appears on their sites.”