The Guardian: UK government considers classifying Google and Facebook as publishers

The Guardian: UK government considers classifying Google and Facebook as publishers. “Karen Bradley, the culture secretary, has said the government is considering changing the legal status of Google, Facebook and other internet companies amid growing concerns about copyright infringement and the spread of extremist material online. The internet groups are considered conduits of information rather than publishers under UK law, meaning they have limited responsibility for what appears on their sites.”

The Guardian: Say moo! Why Instagram loves life on the British farm

The Guardian: Say moo! Why Instagram loves life on the British farm. “Instagram often gets criticised for triggering Fomo or self-esteem issues, but staring at images of belted galloway calves in the Yorkshire dales could inspire an unfamiliar calm instead. Around the country, farmers are using the app to connect not only with fellow farmers but also with fans of their animals, the rural lifestyle or simply just the picturesque landscapes they capture.”

WiredGov: Researchers release largest ever public collection of British conversations

WiredGov (UK): Researchers release largest ever public collection of British conversations. “The recordings used for the project were carried out between 2012 and 2016. They were gathered by members of the British public, who used their smartphones to record everyday conversations with their families and friends. These included: a newlywed couple reminiscing about their recent honeymoon, students drinking in their halls, a father and daughter chatting in the car and grandparents visiting family for the day. In a landmark moment for social science, the anonymised transcripts of these recordings were released yesterday, free of charge, to the public. This is the largest collection or ‘corpus’ of British English conversations ever made freely available.”

MercoPress: Falklands’ government announces the on line Statute Law Database

MercoPress: Falklands’ government announces the on line Statute Law Database. “The Falkland Islands Government has announced the on-line publication of the laws of the Falkland Islands. A public demonstration of the on-line Statute Law Database will take place in Stanley at the Court and Council Chamber at 5.30pm on Wednesday 2 August 2017. Members of the public may also access a paper copy of the Statute Law Database through the public library.”

Exclusive: Google and social media companies could be prosecuted if they show extremist videos (The Telegraph)

The Telegraph: Exclusive: Google and social media companies could be prosecuted if they show extremist videos. “Google, Facebook and other internet companies could be prosecuted if they do not stop extremist videos from being seen on their websites by people in Britain, The Daily Telegraph can disclose. Ministers are considering a new law which would mean Google – which owns YouTube – and other social media sites like Facebook and Twitter can be prosecuted if they allow such videos to be disseminated.”

Now Available: A Database of Prehistoric Human Teeth

Now available: a database of prehistoric human teeth. “Archaeologists have created a new database from the teeth of prehistoric humans found at ancient burial sites in Britain and Ireland that tell us a lot about their climate, their diet and even how far they may have travelled. In a paper, led by Dr Maura Pellegrini from the University of Oxford, researchers say that individuals in prehistoric Britain were highly mobile.” It looks like the data are within the paper, not clear if it’s available as a separate download / standalone thing.

New Resource: Legacies of British Slave-Ownership

Recently (I think) launched: Legacies of British Slave-Ownership. “The Centre for the Study of the Legacies of British Slave-ownership has been established at UCL with the generous support of the Hutchins Center at Harvard. The Centre will build on two earlier projects based at UCL tracing the impact of slave-ownership on the formation of modern Britain: the ESRC-funded Legacies of British Slave-ownership project (2009-2012), and the ESRC and AHRC-funded Structure and significance of British Caribbean slave-ownership 1763-1833 (2013-2015).”