Heritage Made Digital: Tudor and Stuart manuscripts go online (British Library)

From last month and I missed it. Apologies to the British Library: Heritage Made Digital: Tudor and Stuart manuscripts go online. “The British Library is home to a world-class collection of manuscripts dating from the time of the Tudors and Stuarts. Over the past few years, we have been undertaking a major programme, known as Heritage Made Digital, with the intention of publishing online more treasures from the Library’s collections. This includes approximately 600 of these Tudor and Stuart manuscripts. Today, we’re very pleased to let you know that the first batch are available to view on our Digitised Manuscripts site — a list is published below.”

British Library: Our new Science web archive collection

British Library: Our new Science web archive collection. “We have interpreted ‘science’ widely to include engineering and communications, but not IT, as that already has a collection. Our collection is arranged according to the standard disciplines such as biology, chemistry, engineering, earth sciences and physics, and then subdivided according to their common divisions, based on the treatment of science in the Universal Decimal Classification.”

British Library: Shakespeare’s only surviving playscript now online

British Library: Shakespeare’s only surviving playscript now online. “One of the most iconic literary manuscripts by one of the world’s most famous playwrights, William Shakespeare (1564–1616), can now be viewed in full online on the British Library’s Digitised Manuscripts site. The Booke of Sir Thomas Moore does not immediately spring to mind as among Shakespeare’s masterpieces. This late 16th or early 17th-century play is not always included among the Shakespearean canon, and it was not until the 1800s that it was even associated with the Bard of Avon. So what is the connection with William Shakespeare, the author of the more distinguished Hamlet, Macbeth and Romeo and Juliet?”

British Library: Mervyn Peake’s scariest drawings saved for the nation

British Library: Mervyn Peake’s scariest drawings saved for the nation . “Today we are announcing the acquisition of over 300 drawings from the pen of one of the 20th century’s greatest illustrators, Mervyn Peake. The archive includes fearsome and funny illustrations for classics such as Treasure Island, The Hunting of the Snark and Household Tales by the Brothers Grimm, as well as illustrations for his own books including Gormenghast, Captain Slaughterboard Drops Anchor and Letters From a Lost Uncle.”

Inside the Magic: British Library Makes “Harry Potter: A History of Magic” Exhibit Available Online For Free

Inside the Magic: British Library Makes “Harry Potter: A History of Magic” Exhibit Available Online For Free. “The British Library has decided to make its exhibit: ‘Harry Potter: A History of Magic’ available online so everyone magic-born and muggle alike can have a chance to experience it during the current crisis.”

British Library: British Library makes rarely seen historical globes available for up-close, augmented reality viewing

British Library: British Library makes rarely seen historical globes available for up-close, augmented reality viewing. “This month marks the launch of an ambitious British Library project to make 30 historical globes available to all via interactive, digital experiences. Working alongside the digitisation company Cyreal over the course of two years, imaging specialists at the Library have developed bespoke equipment to photograph and digitise the globes, which form one of the most beautiful but fragile subsets in the British Library’s vast maps collection.” The first seven globes have been released for viewing, with the rest being released throughout the year.

British Library: 15 Years of the UK Web Archive – The Early Years

British Library: 15 Years of the UK Web Archive – The Early Years. “Think back 15 years to the beginning of 2005. Future Prime Minister David Cameron wasn’t yet Leader of the Conservative party and Google Maps, Twitter and the iPhone all had yet to be launched. It was, however, the year that we started collecting copies of UK published websites for permanent preservation and access.”

British Library: 10 years of the Medieval Manuscripts Blog

British Library: 10 years of the Medieval Manuscripts Blog. “This month is an exciting anniversary for us: it has been ten years since the British Library’s award-winning Medieval Manuscripts Blog began back in February 2010. It’s a decade that has seen large-scale digitisation, blockbuster exhibitions, exciting acquisitions and fascinating discoveries, and the Blog has been our main way of letting you know about them all. We aim to be inspiring, informative and amusing and above all to share with you the manuscripts love. To celebrate our big anniversary, join us in looking back at some of the Blog’s highlights over the years.”

Library of Congress: New Collaboration between LC Labs, British Library, and the Zooniverse

Library of Congress: New Collaboration between LC Labs, British Library, and the Zooniverse. “The project is titled ‘From crowdsourcing to digitally-enabled participation: the state of the art in collaboration, access, and inclusion for cultural heritage institutions,’ resulting from this call. The project will convene experts in several ways over the next 12 months. Together, these groups will describe and document practical approaches and future paths in crowdsourcing through a book sprint, and open comment period, and a follow up workshop.”

‘Pyke notte thy nostrellys’: 15th-century guide on children’s manners digitised for first time (The Guardian)

The Guardian: ‘Pyke notte thy nostrellys’: 15th-century guide on children’s manners digitised for first time. “The 15th-century conduct book, The Lytille Childrenes Lytil Boke, was intended to teach table manners. It has been put online as part of a new children’s literature website bringing together original manuscripts, interviews and drafts by authors from Lewis Carroll to Jacqueline Wilson. The medieval text is part of the British Library’s own collection, and ‘by listing all the many things that medieval children should not do, it also gives us a hint of the mischief they got up to’, said the library.”

Layers of London: the latest (British Library)

British Library: Layers of London: the latest. “Layers of London, a website home to more than 200 georeferenced maps of London and 1000s of crowdsourced histories, have now launched the latest pillar of their mission, the Layermaker, where anyone can log in to try their hand at georeferencing one (or one thousand) of these aerial images of London. Using the same platform as the British Library’s georeferencer, the user friendly tool makes it simple for anyone to contribute to this project.”

Asian and African Studies Blog (British Library): Zoroastrian collections in the British Library

Asian and African Studies Blog (British Library): Zoroastrian collections in the British Library. “In the past few years several of our manuscripts have become familiar through exhibitions such as Everlasting Flame: Zoroastrianism in History and Imagination held at SOAS (2013) and New Delhi (2016) and also through the Zoroastrian articles and collection items included in our recent website Discovering Sacred Texts. Building on this and thanks to the philanthropic support of Mrs Purviz Rusy Shroff, we have now been able to complete digitisation of the whole collection. This introductory post outlines the history of the collection and is intended as the first in a series highlighting the collection as the manuscripts go live during the next few months.”

British Library: What is left behind? Exploring the Olympic Games legacies through the UK Web Archive

British Library: What is left behind? Exploring the Olympic Games legacies through the UK Web Archive. “The Olympic Games happen every four years. This means that every four years a city has to be chosen as a host city. It is easy to think about the impact of hosting such a big event in your own country. Usually governments have to prepare everything for their guests and be aware that the local population is expecting something that will remain as a legacy after the event ends. But what are people actually expecting? What usually happens after the Olympics? Are people happy or unhappy with the legacy left behind with the end of the games? We can try to answer these questions by reading what was published on the internet before, during and after the games in these countries that have hosted the Olympics.”