The Drum: Vice Media highlights disputed artifacts in British Museum with interactive campaign

This is from earlier in December but the video I saw for it is so astounding I feel I must include it. The Drum: Vice Media highlights disputed artifacts in British Museum with interactive campaign. “Vice Media has created a campaign to highlight the origin of 10 disputed artifacts that are currently in the British Museum. The campaign, called ‘The Unfiltered History Tour’ and conceptualized together with Dentsu Webchutney, is focused on artifacts including Summer Palace (China), Gweagal Shield (Australia) and Amaravati Marbles (India). The stories of these artifacts will be told through an interactive mobile site and a 10-episode podcast series featuring experts from the homelands of these objects.”

EuroNews: British Museum accepts Nigerian artist’s gift – but keeps looted bronzes

EuroNews: British Museum accepts Nigerian artist’s gift – but keeps looted bronzes. “A Nigerian artist who gifted his own work to the British Museum with the hopes of receiving looted colonial art back from them has had his offer declined. The British Museum accepted a bronze plaque made by an artist Osarobo Zeickner-Okoro, from Benin City in Nigeria, who entered negotiations for the museum to return priceless Benin Bronzes that were looted by British troops in 1897. He offered his creation to encourage the museum to give back the sculptures but also to demand acknowledgement of Benin City’s modern-day culture.”

Museums+Heritage Advisor: The British Museum reveals COVID impact with 93% fall in admissions income

Museums+Heritage Advisor: The British Museum reveals COVID impact with 93% fall in admissions income . “The full cost of COVID to the income of The British Museum has been published today by the government after a 97% fall in visitor numbers. The museum’s annual report and accounts to year end 31st March 2021 reveals that admission income for the period fell 93% to £0.3 million, down from £4.3 million in the previous year and net trading income fell by 97% to -£0.3m, from £8.7m in the previous year.”

Exact Editions Blog: The complete digital archive of The British Museum Magazine is now available

Exact Editions Blog: The complete digital archive of The British Museum Magazine is now available. “Exact Editions is delighted to announce that institutional subscribers to The British Museum Magazine can now access the full archive of back issues as well as its members. The museum’s membership magazine now goes back to its very first issue published in Spring 1990 and includes 30 years of back issues to explore, with its 100th issue soon to be published.”

Ahram Online: Online catalogue underway of 29,000 of Petrie’s archaeological finds in Egypt

Ahram Online: Online catalogue underway of 29,000 of Petrie’s archaeological finds in Egypt. “When British Egyptologist Flinders Petrie came to Egypt in 1883 he explored several archaeological sites and revealed some of the country’s ancient history. According to Egyptian law at the time, archaeological dig sponsors had full rights to half of finds, while Egypt retained the other half. Half a century after Petrie’s death, the British Museum in London started cataloguing some of the artefacts he unearthed in Egypt, especially those in possession of the 60 museums involved in sponsoring Petrie’s excavation missions. The exciting news is that early this month they began preparing to catalogue them in an online searchable database format.”

BBC: Web sleuths spot British Museum gaffe online

BBC: Web sleuths spot British Museum gaffe online. “The British Museum is updating its online collection after mistaking a copyright notice for the name of a Turkish postcard-printing company. The museum described ‘Her Hakki Mahfuzdur’ as ‘Turkey’s largest producer of postcards’. But a Turkish diplomat on Twitter pointed out the phrase means ‘all rights reserved’ – and is not the name of a stationery company.”

Broadway World: British Museum Revamps Collection Online

Broadway World: British Museum Revamps Collection Online. “The British Museum today launches a major revamp of its online collection database, allowing over 4 million objects to be seen by people anywhere in the world. This new version of the online database – officially called the British Museum Collection Online – has been unveiled earlier than planned so that people who are currently under lockdown measures due to Covid-19 can enjoy the treasures from one of the world’s great collections from the comfort of their own home.”

Google Blog: Explore the Maya world with the British Museum

Google Blog: Explore the Maya world with the British Museum. “This project has fully digitized the remarkable collection of ancient Maya art and architecture gathered by Alfred Maudslay in the late 19th century. Maudslay used the latest technology of his time to record the stories of ancient Maya cities in Mexico, Guatemala and Honduras. He developed the first dry glass plate photographs of iconic sites like Palenque, Chichen Itza and Tikal, spending years living and working throughout the region. He also created more than 400 large plaster cast replicas of building facades and monuments, which have been stored in the British Museum for more than 100 years.”

Looters Beware: The British Museum Is Leading an International Task Force Fighting the Illicit Trade in Egyptian Antiquities (Artnet)

Artnet: Looters Beware: The British Museum Is Leading an International Task Force Fighting the Illicit Trade in Egyptian Antiquities. “Using their expert knowledge of archaeology, a sophisticated new database, and plenty of detective work, the dedicated team at the British Museum is working closely with colleagues in Cairo and Khartoum to identify problematic objects and expose fictitious provenances. They are also looking for works currently on offer at auction houses, galleries, and on websites such as eBay set off alarm bells. If there is evidence that could lead to an object’s recovery and repatriation, the British Museum reports the information to law enforcement agencies, including Scotland Yard and US Customs.”

Google Blog: The British Museum and Google Arts & Culture: Decoding the secrets of the ancient Maya

Google Blog: The British Museum and Google Arts & Culture: Decoding the secrets of the ancient Maya. “In the 19th century, the explorer Alfred Maudslay set out to capture and preserve the stories the Maya of Central America, one of the largest and most successful indigenous cultures in the world, with more than 2000 years of rich and vibrant history. For decades, he travelled through the region carrying tons of equipment on mule trains through the jungle and created the first glass plate photographs and plaster casts of some of the most important ancient Maya art from the region. More than 100 years later, Google Arts & Culture and the British Museum are picking up where Maudslay left off. Now, visitors from around the world can explore the Maya’s rich heritage online and learn about their achievements in art, architecture, astronomy, mathematics and language.”