Lifehacker: The Fastest Way to Clear Your Recent Browsing History in Every Browser

Lifehacker: The Fastest Way to Clear Your Recent Browsing History in Every Browser. “Listen, we’re not here to judge or ask questions. You need to clear your recent browsing history—and fast. Lucky for you, we can help. Whether you use Chrome, Edge, Firefox, or Brave, there’s a keyboard shortcut to help you delete your most recent web history as fast as possible, should you need to do so for reasons that are none of our business.”

Mashable: The best apps for remembering that website you want to revisit

Mashable: The best apps for remembering that website you want to revisit. “Maybe you’re trying to remember that really funny video you saw online but can’t remember what the heck it was called. You can’t find it online. Your browser history doesn’t go that far back, and it’s not pulling anything up. Or maybe you’re just a bit of a digital hoarder, like me. Either way, not being able to find what you’re looking for is, well, annoying. I’m here to solve this problem. Here are a few of my favorite apps that will help you create your very own web history archive so you never forget about another website you once visited again.”

PC Magazine: Avast to ‘Archive’ Users’ Collected Browser Histories, Not Immediately Delete Them

PC Magazine: Avast to ‘Archive’ Users’ Collected Browser Histories, Not Immediately Delete Them. “The antivirus vendor plans on ‘securely archiving’ the collected browser histories that an Avast subsidiary, Jumpshot, was selling to third-party firms. Avast hasn’t elaborated on the decision, but it may have to do with the company trying to comply with privacy laws in Europe and California.”

My browser, the spy: How extensions slurped up browsing histories from 4M users (Ars Technica)

Ars Technica: My browser, the spy: How extensions slurped up browsing histories from 4M users. “When we use browsers to make medical appointments, share tax returns with accountants, or access corporate intranets, we usually trust that the pages we access will remain private. DataSpii, a newly documented privacy issue in which millions of people’s browsing histories have been collected and exposed, shows just how much about us is revealed when that assumption is turned on its head.”

BetaNews: Facebook to launch its Clear History tool later this year — to the joy of privacy advocates and the pain of advertisers

BetaNews: Facebook to launch its Clear History tool later this year — to the joy of privacy advocates and the pain of advertisers. “Facebook is no stranger to privacy-related controversy, and to try to counter some of this the social network announced in the middle of last year that it planned to give users a ‘clear history’ feature. Although first talked about in May, no progress has been visible on this front, but Facebook’s CFO, David Wehner, has now said that the feature will be launching later this year.” I’ll believe it when I see it.

KnowTechie: Microsoft’s new Timeline Chrome extension will sync your browsing history across Windows 10 devices

KnowTechie: Microsoft’s new Timeline Chrome extension will sync your browsing history across Windows 10 devices . “One of the most useful features that Microsoft added to 2018’s Spring Update for Windows 10 was the Timeline function. Having the ability to see your browsing history across Windows 10, iOS, and Android devices is nifty, provided you use Microsoft’s Edge browser on desktop and mobile. Now, you don’t have to give up your Google Chrome addiction to use the Timeline feature, thanks to an official Chrome extension from Microsoft.”

Research: 4 new ways browser history can be exposed (Slashgear)

Slashgear: Research: 4 new ways browser history can be exposed. “A recent study by the University of California, San Diego, showed four new ways to expose Internet users’ browsing histories. They also showed the ways in which these histories could and can be used to target internet users with various attacks. Most of these attacks take aim psychologically, targeting the trust users have in details to which they believe only their closest friends and family have access.”

Popular Science: Why and how to erase your browsing history

Popular Science: Why and how to erase your browsing history. “Web browsers keep track of your past activity for a reason. That history comes in handy if you want to find a funny article again, or return to your favorite photo of the kids, or if restore a tab that you accidentally closed. At the same time, some people find this constant tracking a little on the creepy side. Not to mention that, if you share a computer with others, you might not want them finding out about a gift you secretly bought them, your interest in 1970s folk rock, or your more private Google searches.” I love disco and I am unashamed.

Ars Technica: After vote to kill privacy rules, users try to “pollute” their Web history

Ars Technica: After vote to kill privacy rules, users try to “pollute” their Web history. “While the US government is giving ISPs free rein to track their customers’ Internet usage for purposes of serving personalized advertisements, some Internet users are determined to fill their browsing history with junk so ISPs can’t discover their real browsing habits. Scripts and browser extensions might be able to fill your Web history with random searches and site visits. But will this actually fool an ISP that scans your Web traffic and shares it with advertising networks?”