TechCrunch: Workona helps web workers finally close all those tabs

TechCrunch: Workona helps web workers finally close all those tabs . “A new startup, Workona, this week launched software designed for those who primarily do their work in a browser. The company’s goal is to become the OS for web work – and to also save web workers from the hell that is a million open tabs. To accomplish this, Workona offers smart browser windows you set up as workspaces, allowing you a place to save your open tabs, as well as collaborate with team members, search across your tabs, and even sync your workspace to different devices.”

Mashable: Facebook’s app is now the third-most popular browser in the U.S.

Mashable: Facebook’s app is now the third-most popular browser in the U.S.. “In case you still had any doubts about how influential Facebook is, consider this: Facebook’s app is now the third-most popular browser in the United States, according to new data. The study, from analytics company Mixpanel, shows that Facebook’s mobile app is the now one of the top mobile browsers in the U.S., accounting for 7.63 percent of mobile browser traffic in the country.”

Browse the web in VR: Chrome launches on Daydream View (Google Blog)

Google Blog: Browse the web in VR: Chrome launches on Daydream View. “Chrome is built to be accessed across all types of devices and platforms, regardless of what operating system you’re on. And today, we’re launching Chrome on Google Daydream View and the Lenovo Mirage Solo with Daydream. So if you have one of these headsets, you can launch Chrome directly from your homepage to browse and interact with any webpage while in VR.”

CNET: Chrome, Firefox rein in memory-hogging websites

CNET: Chrome, Firefox rein in memory-hogging websites. “Good news: Mozilla’s Firefox and Google’s Chrome are working to reduce the amount of memory and other resources their browsers use. You might have noticed that browsers impose an increasingly onerous burden on your phone or laptop. Websites are getting bigger and browsers are getting features that make them more like full-fledged operating systems than mere document viewers.”

Softpedia: Google Said to Deliberately Make YouTube Slower on Microsoft Edge, Firefox

Softpedia: Google Said to Deliberately Make YouTube Slower on Microsoft Edge, Firefox. “YouTube’s new Polymer redesign has brought not only improvements to the video sharing platform, but also a new controversy in the browser world, as non-Google browsers are said to be deliberately slowed down. The issue was brought to light by Chris Peterson, Technical Program Manager at Mozilla, who revealed on Twitter that a technology that Polymer relies on is only available in Google Chrome, in turn making Firefox and Microsoft Edge slower.”

CNET: Firefox users finally get option to block autoplay video, audio

CNET: Firefox users finally get option to block autoplay video, audio. “Firefox users are finally getting the option to block the video and audio that frequently begins playing automatically when you visit websites, something already offered on Apple’s Safari and Google’s Chrome browsers. The option was added over the weekend to Firefox Nightly, the latest test version of Mozilla’s popular web browser, asking users by default whether they want to allow a website to autoplay video with sound. Users also have the option to go into their preferences and block all sites’ autoplay ability if they don’t want to deal with it for each site they visit.”

CNET: Chrome’s HTTP warning seeks to cut web surveillance, tampering

CNET: Chrome’s HTTP warning seeks to cut web surveillance, tampering. “The Hypertext Transfer Protocol lets your web browser fetch a web page from the server that hosts it. HTTP has had a good run, but it has a problem: It doesn’t protect communications with encryption that blocks eavesdropping and tampering. That’s why Google, Mozilla and other tech industry allies have been pushing websites everywhere to switch to the secure version, called HTTPS. And it’s why, starting with the release of Chrome 68 on Tuesday, Google’s browser will warn you whenever it loads an unencrypted HTTP website.”