MakeUseOf: I Switched From Chrome to Opera and I’m Never Going Back

MakeUseOf: I Switched From Chrome to Opera and I’m Never Going Back. “I personally have every major browser installed on my system — the needs of my job require it. But if I wasn’t burdened by that, I can confidently say that I’d be an Opera man. Despite using Chrome for the past eight months, I recently switched back to Opera, and here are my reasons why.”

CNET: Opera’s new browser lets you chat on WhatsApp while you work

CNET: Opera’s new browser lets you chat on WhatsApp while you work. “Opera today introduced a new browser that integrates messaging apps to its sidebar. Codenamed Reborn, the browser lets you chat with friends through Facebook Messenger, WhatsApp and Telegram on a side window while you work on the main browser. Other apps such as Viber and WeChat are not yet included in the support, although the company tells CNET it is working to make them available soon.”

The Next Web: Opera optimizes its browser and launches a news engine for African consumers

The Next Web: Opera optimizes its browser and launches a news engine for African consumers. “The Norway-based tech icon Opera is huge in Africa, with almost 100 million people using its mobile and desktop products across the continent. Recognizing this, Opera is investing $100 million (30 billion Nigerian naira) in Africa over the next two years, aiming to speed up Internet adoption and strengthen the local Internet ecosystem.”

Engadget: Chrome warns you when typing anything into non-secure sites

Engadget: Chrome warns you when typing anything into non-secure sites. “As part of Google’s quest to compel all websites to use the more secure HTTPS protocol, Chrome 62 will flash more warnings when you visit HTTP sites. A few months ago, Chrome 56 (rightly) started labeling unencrypted sites as ‘not secure’ right next to their URLs in the address line if they’re asking for passwords and credit card details. As the Chrome Security Team’s blog post said, though, passwords and credit card numbers aren’t the only types of data worth protecting.”

Techdirt: The Weird Antitrust Questions Of A Google Chrome Ad Blocker

Techdirt: The Weird Antitrust Questions Of A Google Chrome Ad Blocker. “There have been all sorts of reactions to the news of a built-in Chrome ad blocker, but a lot of people are raising the antitrust questions. Obviously, Google is unlikely to consider its own ads to be the ‘bad ads.’ And thus, an official Google ad blocker — especially one that allows its own ads through and is default on its very popular browser — at least raises eyebrows about antitrust issues. There’s a strong argument to be made (and I’m pretty sure that some ad firms would raise this with a court within a day or so of such an ad blocker being released) that this is an anti-competitive move to suppress competing ad firms.”