Mozilla Blog: Goodbye, EdgeHTML

Mozilla Blog: Goodbye, EdgeHTML. “By adopting Chromium, Microsoft hands over control of even more of online life to Google. This may sound melodramatic, but it’s not. The ‘browser engines’ — Chromium from Google and Gecko Quantum from Mozilla — are ‘inside baseball’ pieces of software that actually determine a great deal of what each of us can do online. They determine core capabilities such as which content we as consumers can see, how secure we are when we watch content, and how much control we have over what websites and services can do to us. Microsoft’s decision gives Google more ability to single-handedly decide what possibilities are available to each one of us.”

Ubergizmo: Chrome 71 Rolling Out With Abusive Ads & Billing Protection

Ubergizmo: Chrome 71 Rolling Out With Abusive Ads & Billing Protection. “Anyone who’s surfed the web long enough has probably encountered various websites that have designed ads to look like legit Windows popups and notifications, which when you click can take you to another site where potentially malware can be installed on your computer. However if you are using Google’s Chrome browser, that should become a thing of the past.”

The Verge: Microsoft is building its own Chrome browser to replace Edge

The Verge: Microsoft is building its own Chrome browser to replace Edge. “Microsoft is building its own Chromium browser to replace the default on Windows 10. The software giant first introduced its Edge browser three years ago, with a redesign to replace Internet Explorer and modernize the default browsing experience to compete with Chrome and others. While the modern look and feel has paid off for Edge, the underlying browser engine (EdgeHTML) has struggled to keep up with Chromium. Microsoft is finally giving up and moving its default Windows 10 browser to Chromium.”

Browser Wars 2018: Microsoft Edge versus Google Chrome (Make Tech Easier)

Make Tech Easier: Browser Wars 2018: Microsoft Edge versus Google Chrome. “According to October 2018 figures, Google Chrome’s top position among browsers remains unchallenged. Another browser, Microsoft Edge, is winning rave reviews with its redesigned features and smoother navigation. But is Edge really the future of browsers as Microsoft would have us all believe? To find out, we pitted Edge against Chrome in a toe-to-toe contest to see which is the better browser.”

MakeUseOf: 4 Anonymous Web Browsers That Are Completely Private

MakeUseOf: 4 Anonymous Web Browsers That Are Completely Private. “While it’s almost impossible to remove yourself from the global grid completely, there are some steps you can take to reduce your information footprint. The best place to start is with your browser. It’s your main portal to the web, so using a more secure option will make a big difference to your privacy. Here are four private browsers that are (almost) completely anonymous.”

Vivaldi 2.0 review: The modern Web browser does not have to be so bland (Ars Technica)

Ars Technica: Vivaldi 2.0 review: The modern Web browser does not have to be so bland. “Vivaldi first came upon the Ars radar in early 2015. And given that uniformity mentioned above, it stood out quickly. Led by CEO Jon S. von Tetzchner, co-founder and former CEO of Opera, the primary goal seemed to be rebuilding the browser that Opera once was—the power user’s browser. And by the time its 1.0 came around the following spring, Vivaldi appeared to be on the right track. This could be the cure for the common browser.”