The Verge: Google denies altering YouTube code to break Microsoft Edge

The Verge: Google denies altering YouTube code to break Microsoft Edge. “A former Microsoft intern has revealed details of a YouTube incident that has convinced some Edge browser engineers that Google added code to purposely break compatibility. In a post on Hacker News, Joshua Bakita, a former software engineering intern at Microsoft, lays out details and claims about an incident earlier this year. Microsoft has since announced the company is moving from the EdgeHTML rendering engine to the open source Chromium project for its Edge browser.” Google has formally denied this.

Ars Technica: Google isn’t the company that we should have handed the Web over to

Ars Technica: Google isn’t the company that we should have handed the Web over to. “With Microsoft’s decision to end development of its own Web rendering engine and switch to Chromium, control over the Web has functionally been ceded to Google. That’s a worrying turn of events, given the company’s past behavior.” I didn’t read all the comments because there are over 500, but the comments I did read indicated a lively conversation that’s worth looking at.

Neowin: Former Edge intern says Google sabotaged Microsoft’s browser

Neowin: Former Edge intern says Google sabotaged Microsoft’s browser. “Almost two weeks ago, Microsoft announced that it will be rebuilding its in-house Edge browser from Chromium, all but ditching its EdgeHTML rendering engine. There are many reasons for the change, and the speculation goes even beyond that. Microsoft said that it will do a better job of standardizing the web; using the same open-source browser as Google’s Chrome makes things easier on developers. Former software engineering intern on the Edge team at Microsoft Joshua Bakita says otherwise though.” This is one person saying this as far as I can tell, and I haven’t seen stories anywhere else. If I hear more, I’ll post more.

ZDNet: SQLite bug impacts thousands of apps, including all Chromium-based browsers

ZDNet: SQLite bug impacts thousands of apps, including all Chromium-based browsers. “Discovered by Tencent’s Blade security team, the vulnerability allows an attacker to run malicious code on the victim’s computer, and in less dangerous situations, leak program memory or cause program crashes. Because SQLite is embedded in thousands of apps, the vulnerability impacts a wide range of software, from IoT devices to desktop software, and from web browsers to Android and iOS apps.” So we find out about this Chromium vulnerability almost immediately after Microsoft and Brave announce they’re moving to Chromium? Lovely.

Mozilla Blog: Latest Firefox Release Available Today

Mozilla Blog: Latest Firefox Release Available Today. “It’s the season for spending time with family and friends over a nice meal and exchanging gifts. Whether it’s a monogrammed bag or a nicely curated 2019 calendar of family photos, it’s the practical gifts that get the most use. For Firefox, we’re always looking for ways to simplify and personalize your online experience. For today’s version of Firefox for desktop, we have a couple new features that do just that.”

Make Tech Easier: Useful Chrome Command-Line Switches and What to Do with Them

Make Tech Easier: Useful Chrome Command-Line Switches and What to Do with Them. “Like with all pieces of software, the default settings in Chrome won’t please everybody. Most people will only need to change settings normally accessible through the menu. Others know about a hidden page, accessible by typing chrome://flags/ in the address bar.”