Houston Chronicle: ‘I’m just so, so tired’

Houston Chronicle: ‘I’m just so, so tired’. “As a nurse, LaTonya Rafe has developed a sense of knowing when death is closing in. She felt it the moment she walked into the room of one of her favorite COVID-19 patients, the one she was sure would beat the virus overtaking her small Houston hospital. Not him, too, she thought. The team at United Memorial Medical Center rushed in to try to save the Hispanic man in his 60s as his blood pressure dropped. Their hospital is ground zero in Acres Homes, one of the city’s hardest-hit neigbhorhoods. Rafe speaks no Spanish, her patient spoke no English. She worried he would be frightened, so she scrolled through her phone to find Spanish-language ballads on YouTube to calm him. She stroked his hand because no family was there.”

MakeUseOf: 5+ Free Online Tests, Guides, and Resources to Overcome Burnout at Work

MakeUseOf: 5+ Free Online Tests, Guides, and Resources to Overcome Burnout at Work. “Are you feeling too tired to work, or are you suffering from burnout? Take these free tests to find out if you have burnout, and guides to learn how to deal with it. In 2019, WHO officially recognized burnout as an occupational phenomenon, so it’s not just ‘in your mind’ anymore. There are signs of burnout to watch out for, and techniques to overcome burnout in your professional life. To begin, there are a few online tests you can take, free ebooks you can pick up, and videos you can watch.”

Reuters: Google announces company holiday on May 22 to stem virus burnout

Reuters: Google announces company holiday on May 22 to stem virus burnout. “Alphabet Inc’s Google said on Friday it has asked employees to take a day off on May 22, to address work-from-home-related burnout during the coronavirus pandemic. Chief Executive Officer Sundar Pichai announced the move in a memo to employees on late Thursday, which was first reported by CNBC.”

Engadget: YouTube’s burnout generation

Engadget: YouTube’s burnout generation. “Since about 720,000 hours of footage — equivalent to more than 82 years — are uploaded to the site daily, a major decider in whether a video gets seen (and thus how much a YouTuber gets paid through AdSense advertising revenue) is its appearance on the site’s front page or ‘up next’ column. But despite constant theorizing and probing, most creators are in the dark about what it takes to get their videos surfaced, leaving them in constant insecurity that they might wake up one day to be invisible and irrelevant.”