NBC News: Study finds ‘burnout epidemic’ for working women two years into pandemic

NBC News: Study finds ‘burnout epidemic’ for working women two years into pandemic. “Now, the latest survey of 5,000 women in 10 countries by Deloitte, first reported Tuesday by NBC News, finds a troubling evolution for working women in a ‘burnout epidemic.’ Fifty-three percent of women reported stress levels higher than they were a year ago, with mental health lagging and work-life balance nearly nonexistent. And whereas women were considering leaving their employers last year, the top-cited driver to leave now is burnout.”

Quartz: Searches for “burnout” are at an all-time high

Quartz: Searches for “burnout” are at an all-time high. “According to Google Trends, which since 2004 has collected data on what the world is searching for, queries for ‘burnout’—from work, life, and school—are at an all-time high in the US. The pandemic has exacerbated a trend that was already in evidence: Searches for ‘burnout from life’ began to rise around 2017, but in 2020 they skyrocketed. Burnout from work and school—whether that’s homeschooling kids or attending school oneself—also saw big increases.”

‘I felt like I was drowning’: Exhausted and burned out, nurses are leaving their jobs in droves (Boston Globe)

Boston Globe: ‘I felt like I was drowning’: Exhausted and burned out, nurses are leaving their jobs in droves. “During the peaks of the pandemic, nurses witnessed the suffering and death that COVID can bring. They held the hands of dying patients. They worried about becoming sick themselves, or bringing the virus home to their families. And sometimes, instead of gratitude, patients in the throes of illness responded with abuse. At first, nurses said, adrenaline kept them going. But when COVID receded, other sick patients flooded hospitals. There was no time for health care workers to rest. With each successive surge of the virus, more experienced nurses have opted to leave. And the conditions for those who remained have become even worse.”

BuzzFeed News: YouTube Is Facing An Identity Crisis As Its Creators Burn Out

BuzzFeed News: YouTube Is Facing An Identity Crisis As Its Creators Burn Out. “In the latter half of the 2010s, to be a prominent YouTuber was to consistently push the envelope of what you could create without getting banned, chasing the glorious high of a video that would get tens of millions, or even hundreds of millions of views. YouTube financially rewarded creators who went viral. So creators pushed themselves to do bigger stunts, pull off weirder or more outrageous pranks, and became embroiled in seemingly constant hostile feuds with one another. This created one of the most toxic cultures on the internet.”

San Francisco Chronicle: Here’s why hospital nurses, the pandemic’s ‘health care heroes,’ are so ticked off

San Francisco Chronicle: Here’s why hospital nurses, the pandemic’s ‘health care heroes,’ are so ticked off. ” Understaffing at Bay Area hospitals predates the pandemic, but two years of COVID-19 have made it worse. All told, hospitals in California are short the equivalent of more than 40,000 full-time nurses, a UCSF study reported in August. That’s almost 14% fewer than needed, a shortage the researchers expect to last until 2026 when enough nursing students graduate to match pre-COVID levels. Older nurses are leaving the profession faster than new ones can begin, and many in mid-career say they can’t wait to leave, the study found.”

‘Making music is about making assets for social media’: pop stars battle digital burnout (The Guardian)

The Guardian: ‘Making music is about making assets for social media’: pop stars battle digital burnout. “Billie Eilish abandoned Twitter to preserve her mental health; the US indie star Mitski deleted her accounts after the conclusion of her 2019 tour. The problem hits musicians in a unique way. Actors are not expected to self-promote to the same extent and often eschew social media; writers generally don’t have such large followings nor the parasocial relationships that come with them.”

Route Fifty: Teachers ‘Beaten Down’ By Staff Shortages, Covid

Route Fifty: Teachers ‘Beaten Down’ By Staff Shortages, Covid. “Carina McGee, a high school teacher in the Aiken County Public School District in South Carolina, expected to teach until retirement age. But just three years after beginning her career, she’s reevaluating whether she made the right decision. ‘Everything that has come with COVID, it has just been an absolute nightmare. I have been so much more overwhelmed and exhausted and just beaten down,’ said McGee, 24. ‘I thought I would retire when I was like 65 from teaching, and now I’m considering leaving within the next two years.’”

Killeen ISD teachers: “We’re drowning” … “The house is on fire” (Killeen Daily Herald)

Killeen Daily Herald: Killeen ISD teachers: “We’re drowning” … “The house is on fire”. “Halfway through the second school year upended by COVID-19, some Killeen Independent School District teachers say they are desperate for help — and on the verge of giving up — as the virus continues to sicken co-workers and students amid a worsening staff shortage that has persisted all school year.”

‘I’m barely clinging onto work’: Exhausted parents face another wave of school shutdowns (Washington Post)

Washington Post: ‘I’m barely clinging onto work’: Exhausted parents face another wave of school shutdowns. “Latoya Hamilton had just taken a job as a medical assistant when she got notice last week that her daughter’s school was going online temporarily. The single mother asked for time off. When it was denied, she did the only thing she could: quit. A lack of child care had prompted Hamilton to resign once before early in the pandemic, when she left her $26-an-hour job at NYU Langone Health to care for her three school-aged children. But this time is different. She feels more alone, she said, and unsure of how to make do, both logistically and financially. Federal assistance has expired, and she has depleted her savings and maxed out her credit cards.”

The Atlantic: Hospitals Are in Serious Trouble

The Atlantic: Hospitals Are in Serious Trouble. “Here, then, is the most important difference about this surge: It comes on the back of all the prior ones. COVID’s burden is additive. It isn’t reflected just in the number of occupied hospital beds, but also in the faltering resolve and thinning ranks of the people who attend those beds.”

Baltimore Sun: Staffs of Maryland hospitals, stressed and sickened with COVID-19, know ‘cavalry’ isn’t coming

Baltimore Sun: Staffs of Maryland hospitals, stressed and sickened with COVID-19, know ‘cavalry’ isn’t coming. “As COVID-19 hospitalizations climb into uncharted territory, fueled by the highly contagious omicron variant, Maryland’s medical work force is increasingly diminished by illness and exposure, burnout and turnover. Gov. Larry Hogan has responded with pleas for people to get vaccinated and boosted and wear masks to spare the hospitals. The state opened several testing sites near hospitals so people would stop flooding emergency rooms with nonemergencies.”

Pa. nurses after 22 months of COVID-19 and a new surge: ‘It is so defeating’ (Philadelphia Inquirer)

Philadelphia Inquirer: Pa. nurses after 22 months of COVID-19 and a new surge: ‘It is so defeating’. “As the United States enters a third calendar year of the pandemic, and braces to see whether this omicron- and delta-fueled case surge will cause hospitalizations to spike further, we talked to four nurses, who described units full of COVID-19 patients, most of whom are unvaccinated and many of whom are now skewing younger. They described the emotional toll — ‘defeating,’ ‘disheartening,’ ‘frustrating,’ and ‘exhausting.’”

Washington Post: First they ran short of PPE, then ventilators. Now, the shortage is hospital staff.

Washington Post: First they ran short of PPE, then ventilators. Now, the shortage is hospital staff.. “Doctors at this elite institution are confronting the same challenges as their colleagues everywhere: exhaustion, burnout and exasperation at patients who still refuse to mask up and get vaccinated. And that was before the arrival of omicron, the most transmissible variant yet, which is sickening staffers as well as patients and fueling workforce shortages. As a result, health-care systems nationwide are canceling elective procedures, turning away requests to take emergency medical services patients and grappling with workers calling in sick. Multiple states have deployed the National Guard to help support stressed hospitals, often by simply managing administrative tasks such as helping deliver food or cleaning dirty rooms.”