World Trade Organization: New WTO database details impact of regulatory barriers, other factors on costs to trade

World Trade Organization: New WTO database details impact of regulatory barriers, other factors on costs to trade. “Trade policy barriers such as tariffs and regulations account for at least 14 per cent of trade costs according to estimates from the WTO Trade Cost Index launched on 30 April. The index measures the cost of trading internationally relative to trading domestically, finding that the costs to export are higher for women, smaller businesses and unskilled workers.”

Idaho Press: Connecting manufacturers: U of I student helps build app for Idaho companies statewide

Idaho Press: Connecting manufacturers: U of I student helps build app for Idaho companies statewide. “Idaho has more than 3,000 manufacturers. What it doesn’t have is a way for them to find and connect with one another. Nicole Handlen, an economics and international studies student at the University of Idaho, is changing that with an app. The foundation of any app is data. Handlen’s research started by identifying as many ways to collect data on manufacturers in Idaho as possible. The senior’s research — and resulting database — created the most extensive picture of the Gem State’s manufacturing sector.”

HYPEBEAST: Jack Wolfskin Opens Archive to Celebrate 40th Anniversary

HYPEBEAST: Jack Wolfskin Opens Archive to Celebrate 40th Anniversary. “Marking 40 years since founder Ulrich Dausien established the Jack Wolfskin brand, the outdoors-focused label is giving a look inside its extensive archive. The online exhibition will tell stories from the German brand’s four decades, particularly shining a light on the innovations and products that have defined it since it first emerged in 1981. The archive prominently displays the brand’s signature paw print logo, which launched back in 1983.”

Beyond the Pandemic: London’s financial hub seeks a rebirth (ABC News)

ABC News: Beyond the Pandemic: London’s financial hub seeks a rebirth. “Plagues, fires, war — London has survived them all. But it has never had a year like this. The coronavirus has killed more than 15,000 Londoners and shaken the foundations of one of the world’s great cities. As a fast-moving mass vaccination campaign holds the promise of reopening, The Associated Press looks at the pandemic’s impact on London’s people and institutions and asks what the future might hold.”

NBC News: Manufacturers embrace robots, the perfect pandemic worker

NBC News: Manufacturers embrace robots, the perfect pandemic worker. “The latest jobs report shows the manufacturing sector grew at its fastest level since the pandemic began, jumping by 50,000 positions. However, there are still about half a million fewer employed manufacturing workers than there were a year ago. The question is how many of those jobs will come back — and how many have been permanently disrupted by digital processes.”

OKC Fox: Supply chain database created to help Oklahoma manufacturers

OKC Fox: Supply chain database created to help Oklahoma manufacturers. “Governor Kevin Stitt is looking to help Oklahoma manufacturers find resources during critical times. The first part of ‘Supply Chain Oklahoma’ is an online database called ‘Connex Oklahoma.’ The database will allow manufactures to connect with alternate suppliers, explore production capabilities and view their supply chains visually.”

ProPublica: How a Federal Agency Excluded Thousands of Viable Businesses From Pandemic Relief

ProPublica: How a Federal Agency Excluded Thousands of Viable Businesses From Pandemic Relief. “Like every other storefront in downtown Lincoln, Nebraska, the Coffee House — a cavernous student hangout slinging espresso and decadent pastries since 1987 — saw its revenue dry up almost overnight last spring when the coronavirus pandemic made dining indoors a deadly risk. Unlike most, however, the business wouldn’t have access to the massive loan fund that Congress made available for small enterprises in late March.”

CNET: Over 80% of workers don’t want to go back to the office full time, survey finds

CNET: Over 80% of workers don’t want to go back to the office full time, survey finds. “A survey by Harvard Business School has found 81% of people who have been working from home through the COVID-19 pandemic either don’t want to go back or prefer a hybrid schedule. Of the 1,500 remote workers surveyed for the study, 27% hope to continue working remotely full time indefinitely, while 61% would prefer to mix working from home with going into the office two or three days a week.”

AP: L.L. Bean sees sales boom amid pandemic’s push to the outdoors

AP: L.L. Bean sees sales boom amid pandemic’s push to the outdoors. “With Americans hunkering down and hankering to get outdoors during the pandemic, L.L. Bean recorded its best annual sales growth in nearly a decade, the company said Friday. The Freeport-based retailer started its fiscal year with store closings and worries about survival, but the company weathered the turbulent times with revenue growth of 5 percent, the best showing since 2011.”

University of Virginia: Why Everything We Thought We Knew About Corporate Governance Is Wrong

University of Virginia: Why Everything We Thought We Knew About Corporate Governance Is Wrong. “Nearly two decades of influential scholarship on how corporations are governed and valued is based on bad data, according to new research co-authored by Cathy Hwang of the University of Virginia School of Law. The paper, ‘Cleaning Corporate Governance,’ reveals that an index cited thousands of times by scholars to measure corporate governance and shareholder rights is riddled with errors. Written by Hwang, Columbia Law School postdoctoral fellow Jens Frankenreiter, Wisconsin law professor Yaron Nili and Columbia law professor Eric L. Talley, the new research also offers a dataset with pilot data to rectify the problem, creating a clearer picture about the power dynamics that control corporations and what that might imply in terms of profit potential, valuation and long-term prospects, among other business factors.”