USC Libraries: New Digital Resources for L.A. Community Histories

USC Libraries: New Digital Resources for L.A. Community Histories. “The new digital collections include 15,755 pages of paper records such as broadsides, posters, correspondence, postcards, and ephemera; 1,000 historic photographs; 2,000 video recordings totaling 3,155 hours; and photographs of 95 cultural objects. The archival resources document the lived experiences and perspectives of African American, Asian American, Jewish, and Mexican American communities in Southern California from the late 1800s to the present and are freely accessible online via the USC Digital Library, Calisphere, Digital Public Library of America, and websites maintained by the participating community archives.”

The Current (UC Santa Barbara): Windows on the Past

The Current (UC Santa Barbara): Windows on the Past. “The Gazette was the city’s first newspaper, and published weekly until May 15, 1857. And now all 104 editions of the paper are open to the public. The UC Santa Barbara Library has digitized the Gazette, with issues available through its Alexandria Digital Research Library(link is external).”

KQED: How Some Elders are Working to Preserve the Legacy of the Black Panther Party in Oakland

KQED: How Some Elders are Working to Preserve the Legacy of the Black Panther Party in Oakland. “In Buffalo’s view, one of the most important things he can do is continue to preserve the legacy of the Black Panther Party for the generations to come. Buffalo’s story brings up a larger issue of ownership, power and historical narrative when it comes to preserving and sharing the legacy of the Black Panther Party in Oakland, and the broader Bay Area. He’s one of many people eager to ensure the history of the Black Panther Party is accessible and available to the public.” This man spends most of what he receives in government assistance on maintaining a storage unit containing Black Panther Party history and archives. Even when he doesn’t have a place to live he’s focused on safeguarding history.

SF Weekly: San Francisco’s Musical Legacy Remembered

SF Weekly: San Francisco’s Musical Legacy Remembered. “It’s hard to choose a favorite among San Francisco photojournalist and diehard environmentalist Greg Gaar’s extraordinary collection of 1,114 concert photos — taken between 1972 and 1989 at venues across the Bay Area — through which icons of the city’s eclectic and vibrant music history live on.”

Getty: New Project Launches to Identify, Protect, and Celebrate L.A.’s Black Heritage

Getty: New Project Launches to Identify, Protect, and Celebrate L.A.’s Black Heritage. “Despite comprehensive efforts over the years to record Los Angeles’s historic places, the city’s historic designation programs do not yet reflect the depth and breadth of African American history. Just over three percent of the city’s 1,200 designated local landmarks are linked to African American heritage. Over the next three years, the project will work with local communities and cultural institutions to more fully recognize and understand African American experiences in Los Angeles. The work aims to identify and help preserve the places that best represent these stories and work with communities to develop creative approaches that meet their own aims for placemaking, identity, and empowerment.”

Stanford: Stanford archive to highlight Black histories of Silicon Valley

Stanford University: Stanford archive to highlight Black histories of Silicon Valley. “While there have been a number of extraordinary Black Americans who have helped transform Silicon Valley into a global hub of high-tech industry and innovation, their lives, stories and accomplishments have been largely absent from public record. A new archive at Stanford Libraries hopes to change that.”

CSUDH: Documenting COVID-19 Digital Collection and Finding Aid Now Online

CSUDH: Documenting COVID-19 Digital Collection and Finding Aid Now Online. “The collection can be viewed in the Gerth Archives Digital Collections database, and a finding aid describing the physical collection can be viewed in the Online Archive of California (OAC). The collection includes 61 diaries (.pdf), 16 blog posts (.pdf), 88 photographs (.jpg), 3 videos (.mov), 1 sound recording (.mp3), 4 works of art (.pdf), 3 periodicals (.pdf), and two boxes of Daily Breeze newspaper articles as of December 2020.”

The Getty: Getty Research Institute Presents 12 Sunsets, An Interactive Website Exploring 12 Years Of Ed Ruscha’s Photos Of Sunset Boulevard

The Getty: Getty Research Institute Presents 12 Sunsets, An Interactive Website Exploring 12 Years Of Ed Ruscha’s Photos Of Sunset Boulevard. “The website, designed by Stamen Design working with Getty Digital, allows users to ‘drive’ down Sunset Boulevard in 12 different years between 1965 and 2007, as well as to view, search, and compare the more than 65,000 photographs of this key urban artery.”

UC Santa Cruz: UCSC publishes online collection of 10,000 photos documenting over a century of Santa Cruz history

UC Santa Cruz: UCSC publishes online collection of 10,000 photos documenting over a century of Santa Cruz history. “The University Library at UC Santa Cruz announced today the online publication of the Santa Cruz County Historic Photograph Collection. Consisting of more than 10,000 images, the collection documents over a century of Santa Cruz County history, featuring original photographs and copy prints from 1866 to 1995.”

UC Davis: ‘Aggie’ Archives Go Digital

UC Davis Magazine: ‘Aggie’ Archives Go Digital. “This spring, The California Aggie became the first undergraduate UC newspaper to digitize its full print collection and make it searchable online. The Aggie archive, which goes all the way back to its first issue in 1915, when UC Davis was still the University Farm and its newspaper was known as The Weekly Agricola, makes campus and local history easily accessible. Fundraising — including efforts among Aggie alumni — helped support the project.”

Daily Bruin: New online maps documents Native American ancestral territory at Fowler

New-to-me, from the Daily Bruin: New online maps documents Native American ancestral territory at Fowler. “Current literature on indigenous Los Angeles rarely comes from those doing work inside tribal communities. Wendy Teeter, curator of archaeology at the Fowler Museum, will be giving a lecture at the Fowler Museum on Wednesday to discuss the web-based project ‘Mapping Indigenous Los Angeles.’”

California State Library: California State Library Partners with Google Arts & Culture to Create Online Exhibits

California State Library, and this link goes to a PDF: California State Library Partners with Google Arts & Culture to Create Online Exhibits. “The California State has released its first online exhibits produced in collaboration with Google Arts & Culture, which digitally showcases the unique treasures of more than 1,400 archives, foundations and museums from over 70 countries As a celebration of California’s unique diversity, the State Library’s first two offerings are: ‘Shikishi Haiku’ and ‘Daguerreotypes: The First Photographs’.”