UC Davis: ‘Aggie’ Archives Go Digital

UC Davis Magazine: ‘Aggie’ Archives Go Digital. “This spring, The California Aggie became the first undergraduate UC newspaper to digitize its full print collection and make it searchable online. The Aggie archive, which goes all the way back to its first issue in 1915, when UC Davis was still the University Farm and its newspaper was known as The Weekly Agricola, makes campus and local history easily accessible. Fundraising — including efforts among Aggie alumni — helped support the project.”

Daily Bruin: New online maps documents Native American ancestral territory at Fowler

New-to-me, from the Daily Bruin: New online maps documents Native American ancestral territory at Fowler. “Current literature on indigenous Los Angeles rarely comes from those doing work inside tribal communities. Wendy Teeter, curator of archaeology at the Fowler Museum, will be giving a lecture at the Fowler Museum on Wednesday to discuss the web-based project ‘Mapping Indigenous Los Angeles.'”

California State Library: California State Library Partners with Google Arts & Culture to Create Online Exhibits

California State Library, and this link goes to a PDF: California State Library Partners with Google Arts & Culture to Create Online Exhibits. “The California State has released its first online exhibits produced in collaboration with Google Arts & Culture, which digitally showcases the unique treasures of more than 1,400 archives, foundations and museums from over 70 countries As a celebration of California’s unique diversity, the State Library’s first two offerings are: ‘Shikishi Haiku’ and ‘Daguerreotypes: The First Photographs’.”

NBC 7 San Diego: NBC 7 San Diego History Center Partner to Preserve Decades of Archives

NBC 7 San Diego: NBC 7 San Diego History Center Partner to Preserve Decades of Archives. “The archive, to be held at the San Diego History Center’s Research Archives, consists of video recordings, video tapes, and assorted materials that document the daily journalism of San Diego from the period of 1976 to 2012. Contained in the archives are thousands of interviews and individual stories. The archived materials will be made accessible to the public once inventory and a catalogue have been completed. Due to the size of the archive this may take several years.”

SF Gate: A San Francisco archive has added hundreds of amazing photos. See the best ones here.

SF Gate: A San Francisco archive has added hundreds of amazing photos. See the best ones here.. “For San Francisco history lovers, there are few places more amazing on the internet than OpenSFHistory. The image archive, kick-started by an anonymous private collector, houses over 45,000 historic images of the city, from pre-Gold Rush to the 1990s. It’s a trove of street views, everyday life and famous local events. As photos are donated, scanned and uploaded, OpenSFHistory occasionally adds a big set of new images. They’ve done that recently, and we went through and found some of the most interesting gems in the gallery above.”

King City Rustler: Rustler’s early issues now available in online database

King City Rustler: Rustler’s early issues now available in online database. “Copies of the King City Rustler newspaper from 1901 through 1925 have been converted from microfilm to a digital version, making them accessible to anyone online. The California Digital Newspaper Collection (CDNC) recently announced that the issues have been included in its database, which is associated with the University of California at Riverside. “

Rock ‘n’ roll, clowns, and Roberta Flack: An inside look at a massive new collection of music photography at The Bancroft Library (Berkeley Library News)

Berkeley Library News: Rock ‘n’ roll, clowns, and Roberta Flack: An inside look at a massive new collection of music photography at The Bancroft Library. “Looking through the photographs is like flipping through stacks of vinyl at Amoeba Music, a satisfying exercise in nostalgia. Scanning through the folders, you’ll see Judy Collins, Elvis Costello, Bonnie Raitt, Neil Young, and so many in between… The photographs, 60,000 in all, make up the Howard Brainen photo archive. A recent gift to Bancroft, the archive is a time machine into a moment in music history, offering a glimpse into the local scene and the larger-than-life figures who came through the Bay Area.” It’s worth reading the article just to see the pictures included with it.