TechCrunch: San Francisco passes city government ban on facial recognition tech

TechCrunch: San Francisco passes city government ban on facial recognition tech. “On Tuesday, San Francisco’s Board of Supervisors voted to approve a ban on the use of facial recognition tech by city agencies, including the police department. The Stop Secret Surveillance Ordinance, introduced by San Francisco Supervisor Aaron Peskin, is the first ban of its kind for a major American city and the seventh major surveillance oversight effort for a municipality in California.”

‘Big Sur Hates You’: Instagram Account Seeks to Educate Tourists Breaking the Rules (NBC Bay Area)

NBC Bay Area: ‘Big Sur Hates You’: Instagram Account Seeks to Educate Tourists Breaking the Rules. “‘BigSurHatesYou’ is just what it sounds like. Run anonymously, the account labels itself as wanting to “(Educ)hate you” on everything you’ve been doing wrong in this rugged stretch of California’s central coast between Carmel and San Simeon. Thousands of tourists descend on this sliver of paradise hugging the narrow two-lane State Route 1, famous for its winding turns, misty cliffs and beaches, but some unfortunately forget to adhere to rules set by local and state officials.”

Stanford News: Stanford scans storied Judah railroad map

Stanford News: Stanford scans storied Judah railroad map. “Stanford Libraries has scanned an 1861 map depicting a proposed route for the railroad that eventually connected California with the rest of the country, making the one-of-a-kind map available for online viewing by people around the world. The Central Pacific Railroad Proposed Alignment Map, which is 66 feet long and 2.5 feet wide, comprises four maps on one continuous roll. “

The Register: California’s politicians rush to gut internet privacy law with pro-tech giant amendments

The Register: California’s politicians rush to gut internet privacy law with pro-tech giant amendments. “Privacy advocates are warning that most of the proposals before the privacy committee are influenced by the very industry that the law was supposed to constrain: big tech companies like Google, Facebook, and Amazon.”

SCV News: Budman Donates Vast Signal Photo Archive to Historical Society

SCV News: Budman Donates Vast Signal Photo Archive to Historical Society. “The owner of the Santa Clarita Valley Signal newspaper has donated the entire Signal Photo Archive – an estimated 1 million individual negatives, prints and digital images documenting the goings-on in the SCV from at least the 1960s to the early 2000s – to the nonprofit Santa Clarita Valley Historical Society.” So nice to read about an archive ending up somewhere besides destroyed or in a dumpster.

SF Weekly: We Are Here, We Have Always Been Here

SF Weekly: We Are Here, We Have Always Been Here . “California has one the largest populations of Iranians outside Iran, but without a clear distinction by the U.S. Census — Iranians are among many left with either ‘White’ or ‘Some Other Race’ — it’s hard to tell exactly how many. [Persis] Karim estimates that the state has closer to 1.5 million people of Iranian descent, of which the Bay Area is home to more than 100,000, but much attention is paid to wealthy residents of Los Angeles…. Karim is building a digital archive about the Bay Area’s Iranian American community through a National Endowment for the Humanities grant.”

Berkeley: CalLands maps cropland ownership across California

Berkeley: CalLands maps cropland ownership across California. “To build the CalLands’ interactive website, Luke Macaulay and Van Butsic — both assistant UC Cooperative Extension specialists based in UC Berkeley’s Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management — combined satellite-generated maps of land cover created by the U.S. Department of Agriculture with publicly available land ownership records. Next, they anonymized ownership identity and pulled data from all 58 California counties to include parcels of land larger than five acres. The result is a database that features 543,495 privately-owned properties across the state, creating a data-rich map of crops and ownership boundary lines in every county.”