My Yellowknife Now: Library and Archives Canada funds projects to help preserve Indigenous culture and language recordings

My Yellowknife Now: Library and Archives Canada funds projects to help preserve Indigenous culture and language recordings. “Library and Archives Canada (LAC) is providing $2.3 million to support 31 projects by First Nations, Inuit and Métis Nation organizations. As part of the Government of Canada’s reconciliation efforts, LAC is supporting Indigenous communities as they seek to preserve and make accessible their existing audio and video heritage for future generations.”

Windsor Star: History project on Windsor’s modern women unearths compelling tales

Windsor Star: History project on Windsor’s modern women unearths compelling tales. “Windsor women who were in their teens and early 20s in the 1920s and 1930s — also known as Modern Girls — have had their lives and experiences archived on a new website [Matthew] McLaughlin and two other University of Windsor history students are launching at a public event Thursday. Comprised of 1,400 photographs, advertisements, newspaper articles, memorabilia and oral histories, the digital archive showcases local women’s history like nothing before it.”

Vancouver Courier: B.C. Gay and Lesbian Archives collection has been digitized

Vancouver Courier: B.C. Gay and Lesbian Archives collection has been digitized. “The collection also reflects a broad range of LGBTQ2+ experiences and activities in the Vancouver area from the 1960s through to the present — including Aboriginal drag performers and HIV/AIDS activists, LGBTQ2+ community seniors, transgender activists, youth groups and LGBTQ2+ religious groups. It documents the evolution of a traditionally marginalized community, which has been historically underrepresented in archival holdings.”

St. Albert Today: Michif language comes alive through film and new resource

St. Albert Today: Michif language comes alive through film and new resource. “Wesaketewenowuk. The seven-syllable Michif word is the very apt title for Dr. Judy Iseke’s new short documentary that will be shown Saturday at the Musée Héritage Museum. The screening is part of a celebration of Métis culture and the launch of her new internet resource called Our Elder Stories.”

CBC: Research, photos of Manitoba tundra open to public

CBC: Research, photos of Manitoba tundra open to public. “An archive of photos and research of plants and animals in Manitoba’s tundra are now available online, providing public access to decades of Churchill, Man., history. Professors from York University in Toronto are in the town 1,000 kilometres north of Winnipeg this week to share the Churchill Community of Knowledge — a digital archive that more than 50 York University students have been putting together since 2011.”

Ku’Ku’Kwes News: All documents of the Royal Commission on the Donald Marshall, Jr. Prosecution now available online

Ku’Ku’Kwes News: All documents of the Royal Commission on the Donald Marshall, Jr. Prosecution now available online. “The complete archive of a 1990 royal commission report that examined how systemic racism in played a role in the wrongful murder conviction of a Nova Scotia Mi’kmaw man in 1971 is now available online. All documents pertaining to the Royal Commission on the Donald Marshall, Jr. Prosecution have been digitized and uploaded to the Nova Scotia Public Archives’ website. The collection includes all seven volumes of the royal commission report, notes, transcripts, submissions and evidence pertaining to Marshall’s trial and appeal court hearings.”

SooToday: Digitized letters explore life at residential school

SooToday: Digitized letters explore life at residential school. “The Shingwauk Residential Schools Centre (SRSC) is preserving documentation of daily life in the Shingwauk and Wawanosh residential schools through its Healing and Education Through Digital Access project. A total of 10 letter books spanning a period from 1876 to 1904 were digitized, which include letters from residential school principals Edward F. Wilson and George L. King, which were intended for government officials, church representatives and students, among others.”