This Week in History, 1890-2022: One of Vancouver’s pioneer newspapers goes online (Vancouver Sun)

Vancouver Sun: This Week in History, 1890-2022: One of Vancouver’s pioneer newspapers goes online. “The Vancouver Daily News-Advertiser is all but forgotten today. But in pioneer Vancouver, it vied with The Vancouver World as the best source of local news…. The News-Advertiser has just been added to the website newspapers.com, which bills itself as ‘the largest online newspaper archive.’”

‘A living thing’: The capital’s museums and galleries kept their fires burning during the pandemic lockdown (Capital Current)

Capital Current: ‘A living thing’: The capital’s museums and galleries kept their fires burning during the pandemic lockdown. “When Canada’s capital was in lockdown, the doors to the city’s national and local galleries and museums were closed, but much was still happening inside. Capital Current’s Preslea Normand interviewed numerous officials from some of Ottawa-Gatineau’s leading cultural institutions about how they faced pandemic challenges and adapted their curatorial work and public outreach to life in COVID times.”

University at Buffalo: UB professor’s book inspires digital exhibition

University at Buffalo: UB professor’s book inspires digital exhibition. “Myseum of Toronto is hosting an online conversation with Cecil Foster, UB professor of Africana and American Studies, at 7 p.m. Dec. 8 to officially open a new exhibition based on his groundbreaking history, ‘They Call Me George: The Untold Story of Black Train Porters and the Birth of Modern Canada.’ ‘Derailed: The History of Black Railway Porters in Canada’ is a digital exhibit created in collaboration with Foster that builds upon his book’s illuminating narrative to present the porters’ story through dramatic monologues, articles, archival photographs, artifacts and discussion surrounding their push for civil rights across North America.”

CBC: Stories of Black Canadian veterans the focus of new website leading up to federal apology in 2022

CBC: Stories of Black Canadian veterans the focus of new website leading up to federal apology in 2022. “Ontario historian Kathy Grant, whose Barbadian father served as a volunteer in the Canadian Armed Forces during the Second World War, has been researching Canada’s Black soldiers for years, digitizing their photographs and records and posting their stories on social media. But it was only last month that she was able to launch the website Black Canadian Veterans Stories, funded by Veterans Affairs Canada.”

PR Newswire: Stoney Nakoda Language Resources Launched to Preserve Indigenous Language (PRESS RELEASE)

PR Newswire: Stoney Nakoda Language Resources Launched to Preserve Indigenous Language (PRESS RELEASE). “The Stoney Education Authority (SEA), with support from The Language Conservancy, is releasing historic Stoney Nakoda language learning resources this December. This release includes three picture books, a Level 1 textbook, and an alphabet colouring book. The release also includes several digital resources: a 9,000-word web and mobile dictionary, a textbook-accompanying media player app, and a vocabulary-building app.” You can learn more about the Stoney Nakoda First Nation here.

The B.C. Catholic: Catholic Civil Rights Leagues launches church attack database

The B.C. Catholic: Catholic Civil Rights Leagues launches church attack database. “Last summer’s surge of anti-Catholic arson and vandalism may have abated, but the head of the Catholic Civil Rights League is cautioning that unless Catholics learn to stand together to denounce such hate crimes, worse is yet to come. Christian Elia, executive director of the CCRL, issued the warning while announcing the launch of the organization’s Church Attacks Database, which aims to keep a detailed, public record of all attacks on the Church in Canada.”

Vancouver is Awesome: Massive photo collection from historic Vancouver photographer donated to city (PHOTOS)

Vancouver is Awesome: Massive photo collection from historic Vancouver photographer donated to city (PHOTOS). “A massive collection of photos from Vancouver’s history spanning four decades has been donated to the city’s archives. The collection is the work of Yucho Chow, one of the earliest photographers in Vancouver. As such, the variety of photos in the archive is broad, ranging from family portraits to notable events to celebrity sightings.”

University of Guelph: U of G Launches Multimedia Digital Archive of Rural and Northern Ontario Stories

University of Guelph: U of G Launches Multimedia Digital Archive of Rural and Northern Ontario Stories . “Collecting and sharing first-person stories about the experiences of Ontario rural residents will be the focus of a new online University of Guelph archival project. The People’s Archive of Rural Ontario (PARO) will use various digital formats to share stories of rural residents who are often under-represented in media.”

CBC News: Researcher developing online tool to help find missing Indigenous tuberculosis patients

CBC News: Researcher developing online tool to help find missing Indigenous tuberculosis patients . “A University of Winnipeg researcher is developing an online research tool to help Indigenous communities and families find missing tuberculosis patients who were sent to Manitoba hospitals and sanatoriums but never came home. Anne Lindsay is a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Winnipeg and will be working with the university’s Manitoba Indigenous Tuberculosis History Project on the initiative.”

Canada Newswire: Digitized Photos and Newsreels Offer Glimpse Into Lives of Canadians During WWII (PRESS RELEASE)

Canada Newswire: Digitized Photos and Newsreels Offer Glimpse Into Lives of Canadians During WWII (PRESS RELEASE). “This Remembrance Day, Ancestry®, the global leader in family history, is encouraging Canadians to build deeper personal connections with their families’ lives during the world wars, by providing free access to two Canadian World War II record collections that are new to the site, including video newsreels and photographs featuring photographs of men and women who served in the Canadian Forces during the conflict.”

Toronto Star: Library and Archives Canada service cuts hindering research, historians complain

Toronto Star: Library and Archives Canada service cuts hindering research, historians complain . “Researchers say recent service cuts at Canada’s national archives are making their work — already hampered by COVID-19 — even more challenging. In a letter to Library and Archives Canada, the Canadian Historical Association urges the institution to reconsider reductions that have left its archival reading room open just three days a week.”

Toronto Star: Is there really a Canadian music? With its digital platform Picanto the Canadian Music Centre provides an answer

Toronto Star: Is there really a Canadian music? With its digital platform Picanto the Canadian Music Centre provides an answer. “Look up the Canadian Music Centre in that indispensable sourcebook, the Encyclopedia of Music in Canada, and you will find four columns of type describing ‘a non-profit, non-governmental library and information centre for the dissemination and promotion of Canadian concert, operatic, educational and church music.’ The encyclopedia was published in 1992 (second print edition) and, judging from the latest project of the CMC, as the institution is popularly known, the definition now needs some updating.”

Pappas Post: Hellenic Heritage Foundation Gifts $1.4 Million for Greek Archives

Pappas Post: Hellenic Heritage Foundation Gifts $1.4 Million for Greek Archives. “York University in Toronto will expand its physical archive and establish a digital archive highlighting the experiences and history of the Greek diaspora in Canada, thanks to a $1.4 million CAD gift from the Hellenic Heritage Foundation. The university will change the name of its archives from the Greek Canadian History Project to the Hellenic Heritage Foundation Greek Canadian Archives in recognition of the donation, which will last over five years.”

Toronto Star: Certain ‘Indian’ day school records off-limits to public while province conducts investigation

Toronto Star: Certain ‘Indian’ day school records off-limits to public while province conducts investigation. “After committing to investigate the history of New Brunswick’s infamous day schools for Indigenous children, the New Brunswick government is now calling on the province’s museum, archives and ‘other institutions’ to make records of the schools available to First Nations communities.” The headline is confusing. What I get from the article is that records are temporarily unavailable while they are being digitized for broader access.