Japanese Canadian internment: Over 40,000 pages and 180 photographs digitized by the DigiLab (Library and Archives Canada)

Library and Archives Canada Blog: Japanese Canadian internment: Over 40,000 pages and 180 photographs digitized by the DigiLab. “Landscapes of Injustice is a major, seven-year humanities and social justice project led by the University of Victoria, joined to date by fifteen cultural, academic and federal partners, including Library and Archives Canada. The purpose of this project is to research and make known the history of the dispossession—the forced sale of Japanese-Canadian-owned property made legal by Order in Council 1943-0469 (19 January 1943) during the Second World War.”

Fold3: New Records from the Canadian Expeditionary Force!

Fold3: New Records from the Canadian Expeditionary Force!. “The Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF) was the force raised by Canada for service overseas during WWI. Some 620,000 Canadians who enlisted between 1914-1918 served in the CEF. Of those enlistees, about 424,000 went overseas. Most were volunteers, but when recruitment slowed, a conscription law went into effect in 1918. Our new Canadian Expeditionary Force, 1915-1919 collection contains nominal rolls, rosters, war diaries, yearbooks, and unit histories for the CEF.”

Global News: Century-old photographs digitized by Saint John’s Loyalist House

Global News: Century-old photographs digitized by Saint John’s Loyalist House. “About 100 century-old photographs found inside Saint John’s historic Loyalist House are being digitized and shared online. After sitting in storage for a decade, a collection of dry plate negatives gives a rare glimpse at Victorian life in the city.”

Aldergrove Star: Royal BC Museum uploads 16,103 photographs depicting Indigenous communities to online database

Aldergrove Star: Royal BC Museum uploads 16,103 photographs depicting Indigenous communities to online database. “The Royal BC Museum has opened up to the public 16,103 historical photographs depicting Indigenous communities from across B.C. that were taken between the late 1800s and the 1970s.”

Winnipeg Free Press: Jewish Heritage Centre expands online archive

Winnipeg Free Press: Jewish Heritage Centre expands online archive . “People around the world can now access the oral history collection at the centre, consisting of 200 audio clips by rabbis, businesspeople, professionals, politicians, Holocaust survivors and others. They were recorded between 1968 and 2011. Online visitors can also delve into the newspaper collection, which dates back to the early 1900s and includes Der Yiddishe Vort (Israelite Press), a Yiddish-language newspaper published in Winnipeg; the Jewish Post, an English-language weekly founded in 1925; and Western Jewish News, also founded in 1925.”

Complex: A Toronto Hip-Hop Professor Made a Playlist of Canadian Protest Songs

Complex: A Toronto Hip-Hop Professor Made a Playlist of Canadian Protest Songs. “Even as protests against racial injustice and police brutality continue to rage on across North America this weekend, there are still some who like to claim that systemic racism somehow doesn’t exist north of the border. We don’t have to tell you how idiotic that statement is—just ask Maestro, or the many other Canadian hip-hop artists who’ve been speaking out about these issues in their music over the last three decades. Echoing these sentiments, the North Side Hip Hop Archive—an ever-growing digital collection of Canadian hip-hop history and culture, spearheaded by Mark V. Campbell, a Toronto professor—recently shared an incendiary playlist showcasing tunes of resistance by Canuck artists over the years.”

Ontario Historical Society: OHS Launches Ontario History Journal Digital Archive

Ontario Historical Society: OHS Launches Ontario History Journal Digital Archive. “The Ontario Historical Society (OHS) is excited to announce that, for the first time, the entire run of over 120 years of the Society’s Ontario History journal is now available online. The OHS has digitized the full text of over 2,000 articles and book reviews, making the archive the largest single collection of stories about Ontario’s history.”

Queer in the Suburbs: Hidden histories of Peel Region (University of Toronto Mississauga)

University of Toronto Mississauga: Queer in the Suburbs: Hidden histories of Peel Region. “‘Groundbreaking’ research from U of T Mississauga is creating a new record of the unique experiences of LGBTQ2+ people living in Canada’s suburbs. The project collects first-person oral histories from current and former LGBTQ2+ residents of Peel Region and establishes an important new archive of suburban queer experiences. Select stories will also be featured in an upcoming exhibit at the Brampton-based Peel Art Gallery Museum + Archives (PAMA).”

Halifax Today: Nova Scotia Archives launching online resource with historical information relating to African Nova Scotians

Halifax Today: Nova Scotia Archives launching online resource with historical information relating to African Nova Scotians. “Archival records help people understand the who, what, where, when and why of the past. For that reason, on Tuesday, Feb. 25, Nova Scotia Archives is launching an online resource with a range of historical information relating to African Nova Scotians. The resource, Looking Back, Moving Forward: Documenting the Heritage of African Nova Scotians, includes court records, maps, photographs, newspapers, land records and rare published materials.”

Kingston Whig Standard: Legacy Project looks to archive and display closing schools’ history

The Kingston Whig Standard: Legacy Project looks to archive and display closing schools’ history. “The Legacy Project is preserving the combined history of Kingston Collegiate and Vocational Institute and Queen Elizabeth Collegiate and Vocational Institute.”

Yorktown This Week: Provincial Archives launches online catalogue

Yorktown This Week: Provincial Archives launches online catalogue. “As Archives Week comes to a close, the Provincial Archives of Saskatchewan is pleased to announce the launch of its new online catalogue. This archival catalogue uses Access to Memory (AtoM) open-source software, allowing the Archives to easily share information with the public and with many other provincial and national archival catalogues.”

My Yellowknife Now: Library and Archives Canada funds projects to help preserve Indigenous culture and language recordings

My Yellowknife Now: Library and Archives Canada funds projects to help preserve Indigenous culture and language recordings. “Library and Archives Canada (LAC) is providing $2.3 million to support 31 projects by First Nations, Inuit and Métis Nation organizations. As part of the Government of Canada’s reconciliation efforts, LAC is supporting Indigenous communities as they seek to preserve and make accessible their existing audio and video heritage for future generations.”

Windsor Star: History project on Windsor’s modern women unearths compelling tales

Windsor Star: History project on Windsor’s modern women unearths compelling tales. “Windsor women who were in their teens and early 20s in the 1920s and 1930s — also known as Modern Girls — have had their lives and experiences archived on a new website [Matthew] McLaughlin and two other University of Windsor history students are launching at a public event Thursday. Comprised of 1,400 photographs, advertisements, newspaper articles, memorabilia and oral histories, the digital archive showcases local women’s history like nothing before it.”

Vancouver Courier: B.C. Gay and Lesbian Archives collection has been digitized

Vancouver Courier: B.C. Gay and Lesbian Archives collection has been digitized. “The collection also reflects a broad range of LGBTQ2+ experiences and activities in the Vancouver area from the 1960s through to the present — including Aboriginal drag performers and HIV/AIDS activists, LGBTQ2+ community seniors, transgender activists, youth groups and LGBTQ2+ religious groups. It documents the evolution of a traditionally marginalized community, which has been historically underrepresented in archival holdings.”

St. Albert Today: Michif language comes alive through film and new resource

St. Albert Today: Michif language comes alive through film and new resource. “Wesaketewenowuk. The seven-syllable Michif word is the very apt title for Dr. Judy Iseke’s new short documentary that will be shown Saturday at the Musée Héritage Museum. The screening is part of a celebration of Métis culture and the launch of her new internet resource called Our Elder Stories.”