Toronto Star: SDG Counties digital newspaper archives launched

Toronto Star: SDG Counties digital newspaper archives launched. “It was an apropos launch for a digital newspaper archive, to host an online launch event. That was the case as the SDG Newspaper Digitization Project, with over 200,000 pages of history, hit the internet with a celebratory online launch held May 3rd.” SDG stands for United Counties of Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry, a municipality in Ontario Canada.

University of Manitoba: NCTR launches a new website and archive database – nctr. ca

University of Manitoba: NCTR launches a new website and archive database – nctr. ca. “The new and improved National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation (NCTR) website and archive database is now live. Some of the NCTR’s most important work is sharing the truth of residential schools and providing Survivors and their families access to their school records. The new, easy-to-navigate website and database ensures we help connect Survivors, Educators, Researchers and those interested in the history of residential schools a comprehensive group of resources. The NCTR holds millions of records, many of which are public records, statements and events available to be explored and understood.”

Landscapes of Injustice: Landscapes of Injustice Digital Archive Database Launch events

Landscapes of Injustice: Landscapes of Injustice Digital Archive Database Launch events. “Landscapes of Injustice is pleased to announce the launch of the Digital Archives database this March. Join us for one or both of the launch events each as we explore the materials contained within, demonstrate how to retrieve them and chat with members of the Japanese Canadian community about the files related to their family history and heritage.” The two launch events are March 28 and March 31.

The Telegram: Digitization of long out-of-print Newfoundland traditional music creates permanent record

The Telegram: Digitization of long out-of-print Newfoundland traditional music creates permanent record. “A light thump and/or slight crackle are often the first sounds heard when ‘Play’ is pressed for audio files on the Bandcamp page Kelly Russell established for his production company, Pigeon Inlet Productions. It’s an odd noise to hear on a WAV file or MP3. But there’s a reason. Russell recently uploaded his out-of-print vinyl collection to the internet as a way to preserve the songs, jigs, reels and recitations he had carved into wax beginning 42 years ago.”

University of Maine: First-ever online, bilingual portal to Franco American archives launches this spring

University of Maine: First-ever online, bilingual portal to Franco American archives launches this spring. “Franco American Digital Archives/Portail franco-américain, formerly known as the Franco American Portal project, will offer access to various primary sources about the French-Canadian, Acadian and Québécois(e) diaspora communities of the Northeast. Available records will include letters and other correspondence, scrapbooks, family and business records, newspapers, photographs and other media depicting Franco-American history, culture and people.”

Macleod Gazette: Project creates digital home for Blackfoot items

Macleod Gazette: Project creates digital home for Blackfoot items. “Mootookakio’ssin, at its simplest description, is a project to create detailed images of historical Blackfoot objects housed in British museums. At its most complex, it is creating a virtual home for Indigenous objects, a place to reactivate the Blackfoot relations within them and transfer that knowledge all the way from Britain back to their peoples in southern Alberta. After two years of research, construction and creation, this collaborative project between University of Lethbridge and UK researchers, led by Blackfoot advisors and elders, is coming to fruition, culminating in presentations, exhibitions, workshops, and the launch of the digital object microsite in summer 2021, to be housed in the Blackfoot Digital Library.”

KULR: Blackfeet woman creates international travel website and app to share history, resources, information

KULR: Blackfeet woman creates international travel website and app to share history, resources, information. “A Blackfeet woman has started a non-profit organization to gather and share information, resources, and history of the tribe with travelers across Montana and Canada. The project promotes interaction and contribution from the public. Souta Calling Last collects centuries worth of information through storytelling, factual data, and social trends to help tribal members and tourists better understand the area where they live or explore.”

Toronto Star: Digital archive to help National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation access Residential School Survivor stories

Toronto Star: Digital archive to help National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation access Residential School Survivor stories. “The National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation (NCTR) received $2,411,773 to restructure and decolonize its digital archival records to promote innovative research meaningful to Indigenous communities. Funding was provided through the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI) grant which will enable archivists to build a digital architecture for their archives, allowing for better access to the stories of Residential School Survivors.”

CBC: Archive brings history of Nova Scotia’s aging LGBT community to life

CBC: Archive brings history of Nova Scotia’s aging LGBT community to life. “Researchers at Dalhousie University in Halifax are creating an archive of materials relating to the LGBT community in Nova Scotia dating back to the mid-1900s. Jacqueline Gahagan, lead researcher on the project, said living in Halifax where there’s a naval base and a strong military presence made the creation of the archive even more important because many LGBT people in that era were kicked out of the military after being outed.”

CBC: From fossils to statues to shoes, P.E.I. Museum going online

CBC: From fossils to statues to shoes, P.E.I. Museum going online. “The Prince Edward Island Museum and Heritage Foundation will launch a new e-museum this month, with thousands of artifacts ready for display. ‘We won’t, of course, have our entire collection online immediately. We’re still in the process of photographing everything,’ said executive director Matthew McRae. Staff have been working on the project for two years, and have 2,000 objects ready to go, but that’s just a tiny portion of the museum’s 100,000-object collection.”

University of Calgary: U of Calgary offers a new state-of-the-art home for a massive collection of Western Canadian history

University of Calgary: U of Calgary offers a new state-of-the-art home for a massive collection of Western Canadian history. “Over the past two years, the [University of Calgary’s High Density Library] has welcomed a huge number of new materials as part of a massive, complex relocation of Calgary’s Glenbow Library and Archives – documents and other items reflecting the history of Alberta and Western Canada – to U of Calgary. The transfer of materials, which began in March 2019 and is set to be completed in November 2020, has doubled the university’s archival collection as well as the materials in its rare books and special collections holdings, says Annie Murray, associate university librarian for archives and special collections.”

‘We don’t want our history to be lost’: African Nova Scotian organization digitizes, archives lengthy history (The Star)

The Star: ‘We don’t want our history to be lost’: African Nova Scotian organization digitizes, archives lengthy history. “In hopes of filling in gaps of African Nova Scotian history, the African United Baptist Association and the Black Cultural Centre for Nova Scotia are launching a project to archive and digitize historical AUBA records dating back over 150 years. The AUBA was established in 1854 by Rev. Richard Preston, a former slave from Virginia who arrived in Nova Scotia in 1816. Over the years, the AUBA has served as not just a religious organization, but also as a voice for hundreds of Black families throughout Nova Scotia.”

Japanese Canadian internment: Over 40,000 pages and 180 photographs digitized by the DigiLab (Library and Archives Canada)

Library and Archives Canada Blog: Japanese Canadian internment: Over 40,000 pages and 180 photographs digitized by the DigiLab. “Landscapes of Injustice is a major, seven-year humanities and social justice project led by the University of Victoria, joined to date by fifteen cultural, academic and federal partners, including Library and Archives Canada. The purpose of this project is to research and make known the history of the dispossession—the forced sale of Japanese-Canadian-owned property made legal by Order in Council 1943-0469 (19 January 1943) during the Second World War.”